Lulu and the Duck in the Park (Lulu Series #1)

Lulu and the Duck in the Park (Lulu Series #1)

5.0 1
by Hilary McKay, Priscilla Lamont
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions


Lulu loves animals. When Lulu finds a duck egg that has rolled out of its nest, she takes it to class to keep it safe. Lulu isn't allowed to bring pets to school. But she's not really breaking the rules because it's just an egg. Surely nothing bad will happen... A fun-filled new series for early readers and animal lovers alike.

Overview


Lulu loves animals. When Lulu finds a duck egg that has rolled out of its nest, she takes it to class to keep it safe. Lulu isn't allowed to bring pets to school. But she's not really breaking the rules because it's just an egg. Surely nothing bad will happen... A fun-filled new series for early readers and animal lovers alike.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
“Lulu was famous for animals,” opens this sparkling series launch, first published in the U.K., about Lulu, an irrepressible girl with a penchant for acquiring pets. And, McKay explains in her characteristically understated and cheerful narrative, “it was very lucky for Lulu that her mother was famous for saying, ‘The more, the merrier.’ ” Lulu’s adventures begin when her dog follows her to school (thanks to the trail of treats she drops en route), agitating the class guinea pig and further irritating her gruff teacher. The crux of the novel is Lulu’s rescue of a duck egg she finds after dogs storm the park during a class outing. She sneaks the egg into school and, in one of many droll and endearing scenes, quacks to the egg so “it doesn’t get lonely.” Though aimed at a younger audience than McKay’s Exiles novels and series about the Casson family, this offering has similarly abundant humor and heart. Lamont’s (Animal Rescue Team) robust cartoon spot art offers lively, loose portraits of the story’s human and animal characters alike. Ages 7–9. (Sept.)
From the Publisher

"The satisfying ending will have children awaiting the next installment in what is likely to become a hit series for fans of other plucky characters like Horrible Harry, Stink, and Junie B. Jones." Starred Review, School Library Journal, November 2012
Children's Literature - Uma Krishnaswami
Hilary McKay fans know her for her marvelously wrought books in the "Casson Family" series (Saffy's Angel and other titles). They are books with humor and heart, filled with surprises, driven by the characters, and their true-to-life needs and longings. Here is McKay speaking to a younger audience of children with this first title in an early chapter book series originally published in the U.K. The series (other titles include Lulu and the Dog From the Sea and Lulu and the Cat in the Bag) is driven by the simple fact that Lulu is "famous for animals. Her famousness for animals was known throughout the whole neighborhood." This opening promises a confident, loving narrative, and the story does not disappoint. Lulu is a perfect protagonist in this deceptively simple tale for children transitioning into independent reading. She has that lovely, eccentric determination that energizes a third grade classroom, creating mayhem and curling the toenails of the adults charged with maintaining order. Lulu's universe, it turns out, is one in which chaos and wonder coexist, where duck eggs stay warm in the pocket and friendship conquers all. Its wacky child characters and the long-suffering Mrs. Holiday turn parks and schoolrooms into places that are simultaneously everyday and magical. The final resolution is delivered up with all the comfort and surprise of one of Mrs. Holiday's "shivery bites." Lamont's illustrations add a nice touch in depicting the irrepressible Lulu as a child of color. Reviewed in e-galley format. Reviewer: Uma Krishnaswami
Children's Literature - Lisa Colozza Cocca
What can go wrong when Lulu decides to hide a duck egg under her sweater? Readers will discover the answer in this delightful first book of what will be a series. Lulu loves animals and has many pets at home. She cannot understand why Mrs. Holiday, her very strict teacher, does not love animals. When Mrs. Holiday threatens to trade the class pet hamster for another class's stick bugs if anyone brings another animal to school, Lulu knows she means it. The trouble begins during one of the class' weekly trips to the park to swim in the pool. After swimming, Lulu always loves to watch the ducks in the pond. One week, the children see that many of the ducks have built nests near the path. When two dogs run away from their owner, they tear through Duck Street, frightening the ducks and destroying their nests and eggs. When Lulu sees one last egg rolling down the path, she rescues it and puts it in her pocket. At school, she makes a nest of hats for it and hides it under her sweater. She enlists the help of Mellie, her cousin, classmate, and best friend, to keep the egg safe and secret. She plans to bring the egg to the vet after school. Her plan goes awry when she feels fluttering by her tummy and realizes the duckling is hatching. All ends well with the duckling being reunited with its mother. The book has an old-fashioned feel to it with a blend of sweetness and humor. Lulu, the main character, is kind hearted and clever, with just enough boldness in her to appeal to young readers. The book will appeal both to readers ready for chapter books and to younger children as a read aloud. Reviewer: Lisa Colozza Cocca
School Library Journal
Gr 1–3—In this entertaining chapter book, readers are introduced to irrepressible Lulu, "famous for her love of animals." She loves her old dog, Sam, as much as the spiders in her house. She loves the snails in her garden as much as her hamster and guinea pig. Lulu's mother is famous for saying, "The more the merrier. As long as Lulu cleans up after them." However, her teacher is almost as famous for not liking animals. When Lulu's dog follows her to school, Mrs. Holiday declares that if any child brings an animal into the room as a visitor, the class guinea pig will have to go live elsewhere. Then, on a trip to the park, after a wild rumpus in which two overly enthusiastic dogs trample all of a mother duck's spring nests, Lulu notices an intact egg. She gently places it in her pocket on the way back to the classroom. Her best friend and cousin, Mellie, is sworn to secrecy and becomes an accomplice as they try to hide and protect it. McKay's pacing is spot-on, and the story moves briskly. Lamont's black-and-white illustrations capture the sparkle in Lulu's eyes and the warmth and fuzziness of a newly hatched duckling. The satisfying ending will have children awaiting the next installment in what is likely to become a hit series for fans of other plucky characters like Horrible Harry, Stink, and Junie B. Jones.—Lisa Kropp, Suffolk Cooperative Library System, Bellport, NY
Kirkus Reviews
A warmhearted beginning to a new chapter-book series delights from the first few sentences. "Lulu was famous for animals. Her famousness for animals was known throughout the whole neighborhood." So it begins, revealing its bouncy language and its theme, illustrated by a cheery image of Lulu with bunnies at her feet, a parrot on her shoulder and a mouse in her hair. Lulu's best friend is her cousin Mellie, who is famous for several things but most notably losing sweaters, pencils and everything else. Her teacher in Class Three is Mrs. Holiday, who endures the class guinea pig but does not think it needs animal companions, not even Lulu's dog. When the class goes to Tuesday swimming at the pool by the park, however, and Lulu finds a duck egg, which she takes back to class--that is not an animal, right? Well, not yet. What Lulu and Mellie do to protect the egg, get through class and not outrage Mrs. Holiday is told so simply and rhythmically, and so true to the girls' perfectly-logical-for-third-graders' thinking, that it will beguile young readers completely. The inclusion of the kid who always gets a bloody nose and a math lesson on perimeter only adds to the verisimilitude and the fun. Lulu's classroom is full of children of all colors, and Lulu and Mellie are the color of strong tea with cream, judging from the cover. Utterly winning. (Fiction. 7-9)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807548080
Publisher:
Whitman, Albert & Company
Publication date:
09/01/2012
Series:
Hilary McKay's Lulu Series, #1
Pages:
104
Sales rank:
769,824
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 7.70(h) x 0.70(d)
Lexile:
740L (what's this?)
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

Meet the Author


Hilary McKay lives in a small village in Derbyshire, England, with her family. When not writing Hilary, loves walking, reading, and having friends to stay.

Priscilla Lamont lives in Kent, England, with her husband, the artist David Hayward, and she illustrates at a nearby studio, where she works rather untidily, but with great enthusiasm!

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Lulu and the Duck in the Park (Book 1) 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lulu books are the best becase they are very enter taining for kids ages 8 - 10 and can teach a good lesson for the future