Luna and the Big Blur: A Story for Children Who Wear Glasses

Overview

Do you remember the first time you had to wear glasses as a child? For the thousands of children today who experience this unsettling change in their lifestyle, Luna and the Big Blur helps them feel good about their glasses and themselves. Luna is a young girl who hates her glasses and decides she won't wear them. This delightful story describes the many mishaps that occur when Luna leaves her glasses at home. She eventually learns to accept her nearsightedness after a supportive talk with her father, who is able...
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Overview

Do you remember the first time you had to wear glasses as a child? For the thousands of children today who experience this unsettling change in their lifestyle, Luna and the Big Blur helps them feel good about their glasses and themselves. Luna is a young girl who hates her glasses and decides she won't wear them. This delightful story describes the many mishaps that occur when Luna leaves her glasses at home. She eventually learns to accept her nearsightedness after a supportive talk with her father, who is able to show her that she can feel good about all of her own special qualities. All children will be able to relate to Luna's feelings of being different, and will turn to her story again and again to lightheartedly resolve the many issues that plague them when they feel that they don't fit in. Also included is an introduction for parents.ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Shirley Day is the Corporate Communications Specialist for the St. Petersburg (Florida) Times. This is her first children's book.

ILLUSTRATOR BIOGRAPHY: Don Morris also works for the Times as an illustrator. He has illustrated two other children's books. Shirley and Don both wear eyeglasses.

A young girl who hates her glasses learns to appreciate them after spending a day without them.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Wendy M. Smith-D'Arezzo
Luna is a small girl who wears big glasses that she hates. One night, she has a dream that she can see without her glasses; upon waking she finds out the dream is not true. The story is somewhat contrived on several levels. For example, Luna does not like her name, thinking it has something to do with Tuna fish; she finds out at the end of the story that her mom and dad named her for the goddess of the moon. The story behind Luna's name is very special and does not seem to be one that her parents would withhold until she is old enough to complain about her name. The pictures are cartoonish in style, and the characters in the story, particularly Luna, have wonderful expressions of happiness, sadness, surprise, and dejection. At the end are notes to parents about how to help a child who needs glasses. As Dr. Plotsky points out, children often want to have glasses when they see a classmate with glasses, so this might not be as much of an issue as it was when the book was first published. Reviewer: Wendy M. Smith-D'Arezzo
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-Nearsighted Luna hates wearing glasses, and she hates her name, which she believes her parents chose because they favor tuna fish. One night, she dreams she can see everything perfectly. But when she tries doing without her glasses the next day, she bumps into things and has several near misses. When her father tells her that she is special and that she was actually named after the moon, she immediately cheers up and announces that she doesn't mind wearing glasses anymore. Readers will find it difficult to believe that Luna, who can supposedly see well up close, would actually stir the goldfish instead of a pot of soup or eat cat treats instead of cookies. Also, her complete change of heart is much too abrupt to be credible. In watercolor cartoon drawings with ink cross-hatching, Morris depicts the child wearing yellow frames with red polka dots-her choice, admittedly, but they are so outlandishly big on her face that it is little wonder she hates them. For a more humorous treatment of the subject, try Lane Smith's Glasses-Who Needs 'Em? (Viking, 1991).-Marianne Saccardi, Norwalk Community-Technical College, CT
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781433803994
  • Publisher: American Psychological Association
  • Publication date: 9/28/2008
  • Edition description: Revised
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 227,628
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 7.80 (w) x 9.80 (h) x 0.10 (d)

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