Lunch Box Mail and Other Poems

Lunch Box Mail and Other Poems

5.0 2
by Jenny Whitehead
     
 

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A delightful poetry collection that captures the joys, woes, and humor of childhood

From tummy butterflies on the first day of school, to the joys of slurping Jell-O, this playful poetry collection--cleverly told from the point of view of a child--highlights all the bumps and thrills of being a kid. Jenny Whitehead explores a variety of poetic

Overview

A delightful poetry collection that captures the joys, woes, and humor of childhood

From tummy butterflies on the first day of school, to the joys of slurping Jell-O, this playful poetry collection--cleverly told from the point of view of a child--highlights all the bumps and thrills of being a kid. Jenny Whitehead explores a variety of poetic forms with a range of rhymes, rhythms, and plenty of linguistic twists.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Not only does Lunch Box Mail: And Other Poems by Jenny Whitehead compare "The 1st Day of School" with "The 179th Day of School," but it offers many other poems that capture the joys and woes of childhood. The illustrations add humor as in "Ways to Hide a Bad Haircut" where a girl "practice[s] good posture" as she balances books on her head. (July) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
So what are the rules in your lunchroom? No Frisbee throwing with your cheese? No mushing brownies in a ball? No tossing green grapes to your classmate? These are Jenny Whitehead's "Lunchroom Rules," one of the best samples of childhood life in this new book of poetry. The cleverness of each poem varies greatly from page to page, but at her best, Whitehead captures well the important events and daily tribulations of early childhood. There's the "unclogged glue" and "nervous knees" of the first day of school or the "dried up paste" and "one inch taller, bigger brain" of the 179th day of school. And that haircut you gave yourself? "I really meant to just pretend/ and snip, snip, snip the air. I guess my safety scissors slipped/ and clip, clip, clipped my hair." Lots of tiny, colorful cartoon drawings surround each page. There is even a humorous rendition of food with funny names, like sloppy joes, hush puppies and buffalo wings. There are both rhyming and free verse poems, some with just a few lines, others filling a page or two. The variety of style and topic could be very useful for encouraging youngsters to write their own poetry about their daily experiences. 2001, Henry Holt, . Ages 4 to 7. Reviewer: Karen Leggett
School Library Journal
Gr 1-3-This collection of 38 amusing poems is somewhat uneven. Whitehead's strong points are her gift for point of view and a facility for the rhythms and sounds of words. "The Bug Hotel," written in the voice of an insect talking to a desk clerk at a hotel, is fun and original. An illustration depicts a big glass jar with various creatures lounging inside: "Our room is kind of stuffy,/we could use a little air-/would you be so kind and tap/a hole or two up there?" The author's child's-eye view is often right on target ("What could be slower/than turtles and snails?/Waiting for birthdays,/and popcorn to pop"). However in other poems, clich s creep in ("In the garden,/every spring,/the sparrows chirp,/the bluebirds sing"). The gouache-and-acrylic cartoon paintings are in soft colors and while appealing, don't have much more depth than a greeting card.-Lauralyn Persson, Wilmette Public Library, IL Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Familiar childhood experiences are described in these lighthearted verses, whose subjects range from the first day of school to the 179th and from beginning kindergarten to having a bad hair day. A section devoted to food ("Appeteasers") includes "Daddy's Spaghetti" and "Supermarket Spies," while "In Full Swing" features activities ranging from "Sidewalk Art" to "The Dance Recital." "Winding Down" concludes the collection with "In the garden, / dewdrops fall, / the moonlight whispers, / ‘Good night, all.' " Lightly and brightly colored gouache and acrylic cartoon drawings decorate each page. Although adult readers may find the verses predictable, lacking the punch of a Prelutsky or a Silverstein, younger readers will probably relate to the familiar situations, and delight in the antics and expressive faces of the sprightly figures whose actions extend the poems. "(Poetry/picture book. 5-8)"

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780805082043
Publisher:
Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
Publication date:
03/15/2007
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 9.98(h) x 0.14(d)
Lexile:
NP (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Jenny Whitehead is the author/illustrator of Holiday Stew. She lives with her husband and two daughters in Kansas City, Missouri.

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Lunch Box Mail and Other Poems 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I took this book to my daughter's 1st grade class, thinking I'd read a few poems. The kids and the teacher made me read the whole thing, and they LOVED it. The poems are delightfully clever and perfectly reminiscent of childhood antics and situations, and the illustrations are adorable. This is one book that even adults will enjoy reading out loud (or not mind hearing it chanted from the back seat of the van) over and over. It also makes a great gift for your kid's teacher. It gets 3 thumbs up from both of my kids and me
Guest More than 1 year ago
This new artist/writer has removed her audience from this high tech world and captured the true essence of childhood. Her fresh artwork is the perfect compliment to the witty text. This book is fun, silly, thoughtful and tender. It's a wonderful book for all ages.