Lust in Translation: Infidelity from Tokyo to Tennessee

Overview

Compared to the citizens of just about every other nation, Americans are the least adept at having affairs, have the most trouble enjoying them, and suffer the most in their aftermath and Pamela Druckerman has the facts to prove it. The journalist's surprising findings include:

  • Russian spouses don't count beach resort flings as infidelity
  • South Africans consider drunkenness ...
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Overview

Compared to the citizens of just about every other nation, Americans are the least adept at having affairs, have the most trouble enjoying them, and suffer the most in their aftermath and Pamela Druckerman has the facts to prove it. The journalist's surprising findings include:

  • Russian spouses don't count beach resort flings as infidelity
  • South Africans consider drunkenness an adequate excuse for extramarital sex
  • Japanese businessmen believe, "If you pay, it's not cheating."

Voyeuristic and packed with eyebrow-raising statistics and interviews, Lust in Translation is her funny and fact-filled world tour of infidelity that will give new meaning to the phrase "practicing monogamy."
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Editorial Reviews

The Economist
[Druckerman's] finely calibrated moral compass is matched by a reporter's knack for deft, understated description.
The New York Observer
A witty, engaging exploration of comparative infidelity. . . . Undeniably alluring.
The New York Times
Colorfully told. . . . Entertaining.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780143113294
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 3/25/2008
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 399,268
  • Product dimensions: 5.46 (w) x 7.98 (h) x 0.65 (d)

Meet the Author

Pamela Druckerman

Pamela Druckerman is a former staff reporter for The Wall Street Journal, where she covered foreign affairs. She has also written for The New York Times and The Washington Post, and appeared on the Today Show and NPR's Morning Edition, among many other outlets. She is the author of the international bestseller, Bringing up Bébé , and Lust in Translation, which was translated into eight languages. She has a master's degree in international affairs from Columbia, and lives in Paris.

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 20, 2008

    Druckerman's bias seeps out

    This is a fun and easy read. I must state that I was very surprised by the author's discoveries concerning attitudes on adultery in China, Africa and France. No surprise to find out we Americans are the only ones who will have affairs and not enjoy them, then feel guilty about them every day until we die. Are we really gluttons for punishment?<BR/><BR/>Druckerman confuses me. She relays her wish to be neutral and in wanting to express no personal judgement in her writings on adultery, wishing only to report on social culture and find credible polling data. Yet when she is interviewing men who engage in adultery, and she doesn't like statements they make in regard to the women in their lives, both mistresses and wives, she facetiously writes that she wishes to cause them bodily injury. She doesn't make such hostile statements in regard to her female subjects who are engaging in the same activities and like sentiments.<BR/><BR/>I realize, if I understand it correctly, that for a portion of time while she was writing this book she was a pregnant newlywed. She has as much at stake as any other woman in her position to keep other women from turning her husband's head. None of us want our husbands to stray. But she is so clearly obsessed with the subject, it makes me sad for her. The way she writes I have to wonder about her relationship with her new husband. Did she put herself on this fantastic journey to try and undertsand men who cheat because on some level she feels she married the wrong kind of man and in her own life wants to head adultery off at the pass?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2008

    Can't put it down

    This book is amazing, I love the way it's written. I can't remember being bored while reading this book, it is so hard to put down. The interesting things you will find while reading this book is crazy.

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