Lyddie

( 42 )

Overview

When Lyddie and her younger brother are hired out as servants to help pay off their family farm's debts, Lyddie is determined to find a way to reunite her family once again. Hearing about all the money a girl can make working in the textile mills in Lowell, Massachusetts, she makes her way there, only to find that her dreams of returning home may never come true.

Impoverished Vermont farm girl Lyddie Worthen is determined to gain her independence by becoming a ...

See more details below
Paperback (DIGEST SZ)
$6.99
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (92) from $1.99   
  • New (17) from $2.29   
  • Used (75) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

When Lyddie and her younger brother are hired out as servants to help pay off their family farm's debts, Lyddie is determined to find a way to reunite her family once again. Hearing about all the money a girl can make working in the textile mills in Lowell, Massachusetts, she makes her way there, only to find that her dreams of returning home may never come true.

Impoverished Vermont farm girl Lyddie Worthen is determined to gain her independence by becoming a factory worker in Lowell, Massachusetts, in the 1840s.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In 1843, three years after her father abandons his failing Vermont farm, 10-year-old Lyddie and her younger brother Charles are hired out as servants, while Mama and the two youngest children go off to live with relatives. After spending a grueling year working in a tavern, Lyddie flees to Lowell, Mass., in hopes of finding a better job that will provide enough income to pay off farm debts and allow the family to be reunited. Life continues to be a struggle after she is employed in a cloth factory, but Lyddie finds refuge from wretched working conditions by burying herself in books. Learning that she cannot return home--the family farm has been sold to Quaker neighbors--the girl is seized by a burning desire to gain independence by attending college. Readers will sympathize with Lyddie's hardships and admire her determination to create a better life for herself. Paterson The Tale of the Mandarin Ducks clearly depicts the effects of poverty during the 19th century, focusing on the plight of factory workers enslaved by their dismal jobs. Impeccably researched and expertly crafted, this book is sure to satisfy those interested in America's industrialization period. Ages 10-14. Mar.
Children's Literature - Jan Lieberman
Slave wages, inhuman working conditions, 13-hour days, 6 days a week seem absurd in today's work world, but this was the norm in the woolen mills of Massachusetts in the 1840's. It becomes all to real when you meet Lyddie. Determined to pay off debts on her family's farm, she becomes a machine driven by her need to bring her family together. At 14, she suffers, endures, and finally matures into the kind of woman she respects as do the readers. This is a powerful story, beautifully written that you will want to read again and again.
.
* "Rich in historical detail . . . a superb story of grit, determination, and personal growth."
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780140373899
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 1/28/1995
  • Edition description: DIGEST SZ
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 66,604
  • Age range: 10 - 14 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 7.82 (h) x 0.51 (d)

Meet the Author

People are always asking me questions I don't have answers for. One is, "When did you first know that you wanted to become a writer?" The fact is that I never wanted to be a writer, at least not when I was a child, or even a young woman. Today I want very much to be a writer. But when I was ten, I wanted to be either a movie star or a missionary. When I was twenty, I wanted to get married and have lots of children.

Another question I can't answer is, "When did you begin writing?" I can't remember. I know I began reading when I was four or five, because I couldn't stand not being able to. I must have tried writing soon afterward. Fortunately, very few samples of my early writing survived the eighteen moves I made before I was eighteen years old. I say fortunately because the samples that did manage to survive are terrible, with the single exception of a rather nice letter I wrote to my father when I was seven. We were living in Shanghai, and my father was working in our old home territory, which at the time was across various battle lines. I missed him very much, and in telling him so, I managed a piece of writing I am not ashamed of to this day.

A lot has happened to me since I wrote that letter. The following year, we had to refugee a second time because war between Japan and the United States seemed inevitable. During World War II, we lived in Virginia and North Carolina, and when our family's return to China was indefinitely postponed, we moved to various towns in North Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia, before my parents settled in Winchester, Virginia.

By that time, I was ready to begin college. I spent four years at King College in Bristol Tennessee, doing what I loved best — reading English and American literature — and avoiding math whenever possible.

My dream of becoming a movie star never came true, but I did a lot of acting all through school, and the first writing for which I got any applause consisted of plays I wrote for my sixth-grade friends to act out.

On the way to becoming a missionary, I spent a year teaching in a rural school in northern Virginia, where almost all my children were like Jesse Aarons. I'll never forget that wonderful class. A teacher I once met at a meeting in Virginia told me that when she read Bridge to Terabithia to her class, one of the girls told her that her mother had been in that Lovettsville sixth grade. I am very happy that those children, now grown up with children of their own, know about the book. I hope they can tell by reading it how much they meant to me.

After Lovettsville, I spent two years in graduate school in Richmond, Virginia, studying Bible and Christian education; then I went to Japan. My childhood dream was, of course, to be a missionary to China and eat Chinese food three times a day. But China was closed to Americans in 1957, and a Japanese friend urged me to go to Japan instead. I remembered the Japanese as the enemy. They were the ones who dropped the bombs and then occupied the towns where I had lived as a child. I was afraid of the Japanese, and so I hated them. But my friend persuaded me to put aside those childish feelings and give myself a chance to view the Japanese in a new way.

If you've read my early books, you must know that I came to love Japan and feel very much at home there. I went to language school, and lived and worked in that country for four years. I had every intention of spending the rest of my life among the Japanese. But when I returned to the States for a year of study in New York, I met a young Presbyterian pastor who changed the direction of my life once again. We were married in 1962.

I suppose my life as a writer really began in 1964. The Presbyterian church asked me to write some curriculum materials for fifth- and sixth-graders. Since the church had given me a scholarship to study and I had married instead of going back to work in Japan, I felt I owed them something for their money. So I began writing. By the time the books were published I had moved three more times, acquired three children, and was hooked on writing.

But I decided I didn't want to write nonfiction. I wanted to write what I love to read — fiction. I didn't know that wanting to write fiction and being able to write fiction were two quite separate things. In the cracks of time between feedings, diapering, cooking, reading aloud, walking to the park, getting still another baby, and carpooling to nursery school, I wrote and wrote, and published practically nothing.

A friend in the church in Maryland, where we were living, felt sorry for me. There I was, four babies in just over four years (two adopted and two home-made), trying to write but with no success. So she decided to take me to an adult education course in creative writing one night a week. Eventually the novel that I wrote in the course was published, and I had become a writer. Do I like being a writer? I love it. I often tell my husband that it's the only job I could hold now. I'm spoiled. I work at home in my own study, wearing whatever I please. I never have to call in sick. From time to time, I get to go to schools and other places where I meet delightful people who love books as much as I do.

But there are days when I wonder how on earth I got involved in this madness. Why, oh why, did I ever think I had anything to say that was worth putting down on paper? And there are those days when I have finished a book and can't for the life of me believe I'll ever have the wit or will to write another.

Eventually a character or characters will walk into my imagination and begin to take over my life. I'll spend the next couple of years getting to know them and telling their story. Then the joy of writing far outweighs the struggle, and I know beyond any doubt that I am the most fortunate person in the world to have been given such work to do.

copyright © 2000 by Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1 The Bear 1
2 Kindly Friends 10
3 Cutler's Tavern 18
4 Frog in a Butter Churn 27
5 Going Home 35
6 Ezekial 39
7 South to Freedom 46
8 Number Five, Concord Corporation 52
9 The Weaving Room 62
10 Oliver 74
11 The Admirable Choice 79
12 I Will Not Be a Slave 86
13 Speed Up 94
14 Ills and Petitions 106
15 Rachel 117
16 Fever 127
17 Doffer 131
18 Charlie at Last 141
19 Diana 148
20 B Is for Brigid 155
21 Turpitude 162
22 Farewell 169
23 Vermont, November 1846 177
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 42 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(19)

4 Star

(12)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(4)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 42 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2005

    Truly the best book I have ever read

    Those who have read this book, including myself agree that the main character Lyddie is a very intresting and hard-working girl. We have also come to a conclusion that most children in grades 5-8 enjoy this story the most, of all wo read it. I believe that anyone who has worked very hard before can easily relate to how Lyddie feels during most of this book. I am quite sure that all who will read this outstanding story would award at least four stars, but I give it five, because all of it was possible to happen, and it takes place in the 1840s, during the Industrial Revolution. Most people have not experienced noise as loud as the looms Lyddie must try to run. Despite this and and many other problems that I dare not give away, she persists following her dreams to earn the money needed to pay off the debts of the farm that she and her family live on.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 3, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Not good.

    This is the kind of book that teachers would give you for summer reading, informative but VERY boring. I do not recommend it if you are looking for a book to cheer you up, because trust me this one will not!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2008

    worsxt book ever

    I had to read this book for school and it was just so boring. It was all just so depressing. Yes, it did show what things were like back than but it made it sound like ev eryone in the world was living like she was. it was just bad.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2008

    I hated this book :

    Lyddie, i really wasn't happy with this book. First of all thick text ,second of all confusing, and finnaly it was boring it was like get up work eat bed and on and on and it was kinda sad so it didn't make the reader feel good .Its cool in all about the mills but, it wasn't satisfying coouldnt find a climax really bland no flavor.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2008

    A reviewer

    I thought this book was great. Life is not perfect, and the reality this author showed about it makes the book a breath of fresh air. The harsh factory life, Lyddie's family situation, and the way she had to cope with it was all very believable. I was expecting childish, but actually I was quite blown away. Definitely recommended!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2007

    A reviewer

    I had to read this book for school. I'm in 7th gd. I really thought it would really boring and it actully ended up being really good! Luke seems so uhm-uhm!!!!!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2006

    Wasn't As Bad As I Thought

    I had to read this book for school, and it wasn't as bad as I thought it was going to be. One of the things I didn't like was the end. Not quite what you expected, and what happened to her dad?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2006

    I love Historical Fiction

    Lyddie is possibly the best book I have ever read. I recomeded it to my librarian and she loved it. So much she bought several copies for the school library. It is sad but moving. I recomend it to anyone who has ever had to work for something. I love this book!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2005

    Lyddie

    Lyddie is a great book about a very responsible girl trying to get along in the world. Her family's farm went into debt and her and her brother are trying to pay it off. I was not able to relate to the girl because it was such a different time, but I'm sure someone will be able to. I loved this book, it is such an interesting story, and I'm sure you'll like it too. All ages will like this story. I give it 5 stars.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2005

    Lyddie amazing

    Lydddie is a brave, tough girl who is very responsible.She can stare down a bear and work t the ultimate speed. She has to take care of her family with the help of her brother, Charlie. Lyddie's fatherhas left the family and a debt that Lyddie has to pay off before her uncle sells the farm! I can't relate to Lyddie because T have never been in that kind of situation. I liked the book, my favoritepart whes when she dealt with a bear, or when she had to take care of her younger sister, Rachel. I would recommend this book to children and adults. The age group that may like it the most would be pre-teens.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2003

    Great book

    I really enjoyed reading this book,and I highly reccomend it!! :)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2003

    Fading Memories and Memorised Pages...

    As a child, I came across an old copy of 'Lyddie' in the $0.50 bin at a school book store. At the time I had no idea what the book was about, but purchased it anyway due to the fact that my teacher was encouraging my class mates and I to hurry. The first time I read it was three years later, while I was in the fifth grade. From the time when Lyddie first learns how to work at the mill, I was hypnotised and nothing except the book mattered to me. Because of the way that Lyddie worked, I began to help my mother when she needed me, and would help my father in his print shop, removing the printed sheets from the machines and bringing them to the sorter across the room for $2.00 an hour. The girl in the book had become my hero. The person I wanted to be like, no matter what anyone else had to say. Over and over again I read it, untill I began to use some of the wording in my everyday conversations. And I actually cried for over an hour when I discovered that the book had been left in the locker room of a sports center and somehow vanished before I could get back to retrieve it. Maybe it was because my grandmother died around the same time I lost it, but years later, while a junior in high school, I was shooked to find a copy at the local library and the first thing that came to my mind was my grandmother, and I just had to rent it. It is defenatly a one of a kind book, and if there was ever one that I have more memories of it is this book. In fact, very few of my memories from 5th-th grade don't involve the book. I would definatly reconmend it to anyone with an earge to be someone else, or that has a strong taking to role playing. Lyddie deffenatly is someone to admire, and want to become.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2003

    Sweet Book (Lyddie)

    I wanna thank my best friend Maria for letting me read this book because it was so awesome!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 30, 2002

    Lyddie From a Student's Point of View

    Lyddie by Katherine Paterson is a book that I thoroughly enjoyed and that I highly recommend. A young girl is sent by her mother to work in a tavern to pay the debt that the family has on the farm since her father left them. While there, she finds out that she can get higher pay as a "factory girl". She travels to Lowell, Massachusetts, and gets a job in a factory there. She makes friends, and is happy that she is making more money. But she is often faced with the problem of whether or not to sign the petition against unhealthy working conditions. Which is more important to her? Her job or her health? Will she get enough money to pay the debt before her evil uncle takes the farm? While the plot is a little slow getting started, it quickly becomes very interesting and suspenseful. This is a great book. The author did a wonderful job.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2002

    Reviewing Lyddie

    Lyddie Worthen lives with her mother, brother Charlie and two sisters in a small cabin on their farm. Her mother is not a stable person and Lyddie has to take on paying the farm debts. She looks for work in the factories in Lowell Mass. Factory life is hard but her goal is to one day return home with all the debts paid and live on the farm with her family. While reading the book I felt as though I was living life in the 1800's right alongside Lyddie. The story seemed so real and I felt some of the same emotion as the characters. I thought the book was very interesting in that it drew you in and let you see what life was really like for the women who worked in those factories. This book is written on a level that would make it easy for students to read and understand. I think that teachers will find this book to be a great accompaniment to History or Social Studies lessons pertaining to the industrial revolution, the factory system in America or as a testament to everyday life at this time in the history of our country.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 26, 2002

    I thought Lyddie was...

    I had to read this for school. It had no really exciting parts, and I think that it is not the greatest book. However, it didn't drag on and on, and wasn't too boring. If you like historical fiction though, you will probably likke Lyddie.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2002

    ???

    The book is great, but seriously, do they have to have such a grim blurb?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2002

    Lyddie for Lyddie

    I read this book and I like loved it because I love books about the Industrial Revolution, and like, my friend, Lyddie, does to. So, this year, for her 13th b-day. I bought her this book. She loved it! Normally, she doesn't care for books by Katherine Paterson, but she really liked this one!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2002

    I was dissappointed

    I had to read this book for school. Although I enjoyed Kathrine Paterson's Bridge to Terrabithia, I was very dissappointed in this books ending. It seeemed as though all Lyddie's hard work was for nothing, and that she could never truly be happy.What was the point of writing this story? Yes, Lyddie was strong, but she was never rewarded for it. And why would the reader want to be strong if they see that nothing good will come of it?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2002

    Lyddie by Katerine Paterson

    Lyddie is a historical fiction novel written by Katherine Paterson. It is the story of an impoverished farm-girl living in 19th century Vermont who is forced to carry the burden of repaying her father's substantial debts. When Lyddie realizes that she cannot raise the funds living at home, she embarks on a journey to earn the money needed to save her farmhouse. As the journey becomes one of self-reliance and self-discovery, Lyddie learns the value of overcoming adversity. Lyddie is a book of high literary merit because Katherine Paterson creates an authentic setting in Lowell, Massachusetts, where the reader can experience the life and times of a young girl defying adversity. The book has several developed themes such as self-reliance, responsibility, and overcoming obstacles. I found the novel Lyddie to be an inspirational story, which allowed me to appreciate the value of independence and a sense of duty. This is an extremely positive story for anyone to read, teaching the reader both a sense of responsibility and the benefits of transcending yourself, both mentally and physically. Lyddie also provides a wonderful role model for young women, teaching the benefits of self-reliance and overcoming socioeconomic obstacles. This book could be incorporated into the classroom to further expand students' knowledge concerning labor laws, child labor, life in Lowell, Massachusetts, and the working conditions endured during the 19th century. Lyddie has a strong story line and allows the audience to follow the journey of an impoverished farm-girl. Children who enjoy adventures and who are interested in the life of children in the 1800's would enjoy reading this historical fiction novel.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 42 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)