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Lyle Lovett and His Large Band
     

Lyle Lovett and His Large Band

3.0 3
by Lyle Lovett & His Large Band
 

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While from the outset Lyle Lovett sounded like a hard artist to pigeonhole, his sponsors at Curb Records and MCA Records seemed determined to sell him as a country artist, though the blues and retro-jazz leanings of Lovett's second album, Pontiac, suggested that strategy would only be practical for so long. With his third album, 1989's Lyle Lovett and His

Overview

While from the outset Lyle Lovett sounded like a hard artist to pigeonhole, his sponsors at Curb Records and MCA Records seemed determined to sell him as a country artist, though the blues and retro-jazz leanings of Lovett's second album, Pontiac, suggested that strategy would only be practical for so long. With his third album, 1989's Lyle Lovett and His Large Band, Lovett seemingly sidelined any career aspirations as a mainstream country act he or his handlers may have held. The album kicks off with a lively cover of Clifford Brown's "The Blues Walk," and the next five tunes all bear the smoky, late-night vibe of a low-key jazz joint, with top marks going to the hilariously off-kilter "Here I Am," the witty scenario of potential infidelity "What Do You Do/The Glory of Love," and the marvelously sly "Good Intentions." The second half of the album is steeped in twang, but it was hardly more comforting for country radio programmers; "I Married Her Just Because She Looks Like You" is a "sweet on the outside and sick on the inside" tale of romantic obsession, "Nobody Knows Me" bears a punchline that makes "God Will" sound generous, and Lovett's straight-faced cover of "Stand By Your Man" stubbornly refuses to either announce itself as a joke or suggest another interpretation. Wherever you choose to file it, Lyle Lovett and His Large Band made it clear that Lovett was only getting better with each album; the songs are uniformly well-crafted, Lovett's vocals are full of subtle nuance, and his band is in brilliant form throughout (with special kudos to Lovett's frequent vocal foil, Francine Reed). If you're going to burn your bridges, you could hardly find a better way to do it than this.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/25/1990
Label:
Mca Nashville
UPC:
0076742226329
catalogNumber:
42263

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Lyle Lovett & His Large Band   Primary Artist
David Ball   Background Vocals
Rodney Crowell   Background Vocals
Walter Hyatt   Background Vocals
Lyle Lovett   Acoustic Guitar,Track Performer
Matt Rollings   Piano,Hammond Organ
Billy Williams   Acoustic Guitar
Richard Bennett   Bass,6-string bass
Paul Franklin   Steel Guitar
John Hagen   Cello
Ray Herndon   Electric Guitar
Deschamps Hood   Acoustic Guitar,Background Vocals
Andy Laster   Baritone Saxophone
Paul Leim   Drums
Mac McAnally   Background Vocals
Steve Marsh   Alto Saxophone,Tenor Saxophone
Mark O'Connor   Fiddle,Mandola
Francine Reed   Background Vocals
Harry Stinson   Background Vocals
Leland Sklar   Bass

Technical Credits

Lyle Lovett   Producer
Billy Williams   Producer
Tony Brown   Producer
Simon Levy   Art Direction
Chuck Ainlay   Engineer

Customer Reviews

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Lyle Lovett and His Large Band 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
we're not big country fans, but this CD is mostly NOT country - I dare you to listen to these songs and not smile or laugh out loud!
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you think Lyle Lovette is just about country music, think again. The man has enormous talent. His voice is well suited to blues music and he uses it skillfully to render some smoldering blues numbers on this album. Yes, there is some country music also deliciously flavored with Lovette's unique interpretations. Too bad this album didn't include one of my favorites, "That's Right, You're Not From Texas", which is one of the best numbers in Lovette's repertoire.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago