M or F?

M or F?

4.2 69
by Lisa Papademetriou, Christopher Tebbetts
     
 

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Frannie is desperate to get the attention of her crush, Jeffrey, but too shy to make a move. Frannie's gay best friend, Marcus, advises her to get the ball rolling by chatting with Jeffrey online, but Frannie won't type a word. Marcus takes over at the keyboard, and soon his plan is a success! But the more he chats, the more it seems Jeffrey is falling for Marcus, not… See more details below

Overview

Frannie is desperate to get the attention of her crush, Jeffrey, but too shy to make a move. Frannie's gay best friend, Marcus, advises her to get the ball rolling by chatting with Jeffrey online, but Frannie won't type a word. Marcus takes over at the keyboard, and soon his plan is a success! But the more he chats, the more it seems Jeffrey is falling for Marcus, not Frannie. Whose romance is this, anyway?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The authors create a modern Cyrano de Bergerac story that is both funny and touching. Frannie is nervous about chatting online with her high school crush, so her "queer guy brain twin," Marcus, takes over the typing. Pretty soon, he's chatting with Jeffrey often, pretending to be Frannie-even without her permission-and it's clear he's "falling for" him. Of course, she ultimately finds out, and this leads to a big fight. But Frannie and Marcus then wonder: could Jeffrey be gay, too? Told from the friends' alternating perspectives, with plenty of online chats throughout, readers will like both of the flawed, funny protagonists, and appreciate their tight bond (they finish sentences for each other and spend Saturday nights watching offbeat movies together). Some of the characters, such as Marcus's eccentric Southern grandmother, are scripted, and up-tight activist Jeffrey may not seem worth the fuss (though it eventually becomes clear why). But the authors craftily keep readers guessing: is Jeffrey or isn't he? From the beginning, Marcus tells readers that this story would make a great film, and the conclusion, much like a typical teen movie, ramps up, then wraps a bit neatly. Even so, readers will likely laugh out loud and applaud. Ages 12-up. (Oct.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
A modern day Cyrano de Bergerac tale, this book relates the adventures and miscommunications of four star-crossed would-be lovers who conduct their affairs not by letter but by e-mail The title gives a big hint, though, as to why these four high school flirts are a bit different. Three of the main characters are male and one is female. Marcus and Frannie are "brain twins," or the best of friends. Marcus is openly gay and agrees to help Frannie, who is too shy to speak for herself, to converse via an internet chat room with Jeffrey, the crush of her life. Things progress from there until Marcus and Jeffrey are cozily conversing without Frannie and finding there is quite a bit of electricity between them. At least that is what Marcus thinks. It turns out Jeffrey has not been speaking for himself either, but instead has enlisted his best friend, Glenn, to do the talking. Through a procession of internet, phone, and personal escapades involving many embarrassing moments and mistaken sexual preferences, the four finally sort themselves out into two happy couples. The abundance of hip, teen-savvy dialog, especially the use of internet lingo, makes this book quick to read and quite believable. The content, though, will raise eyebrows for some, as the sexual innuendoes are pronounced and frequent. Young adults who are confronting issues of sexual preference may find the book useful, but it would not be generally appropriate for the high-school classroom. 2005, Razorbill, Ages 15 up.
—Sheryl O'Sullivan
School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up-The moment flamboyant Marcus meets fashion-forward Frannie, they become "brain twins." They do everything together, even chat online with Frannie's crush, Jeffrey. However, Marcus crosses the line when he pretends to be Frannie, chats with Jeffrey on his own-and falls head over heals. Poor Jeffrey remains a cardboard character, but Marcus and Frannie are well drawn, and the story is engaging and fun. Most teen fiction with gay characters tends toward heavy, issue-driven stories. This is one of a new crop in which gay teens are depicted as regular high school students-no deep delving into coming out or what it means to be gay in a high school. David Levithan's Boy Meets Boy (Knopf, 2003) is far more creative, but this is a solid second.-Morgan Johnson-Doyle, Sierra High School, Colorado Springs, CO Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Two teens entering high school become best friends, "brain twins," in fact. Frannie, a straight girl, seeks her first boyfriend and Marcus, her gay friend, seeks the same. When Frannie falls for handsome Jeffrey, Marcus helps her contact him on the Internet and coaches her in the budding romance, all the while falling for Jeffrey himself. Unknown to Frannie, Marcus begins having Internet conversations with Jeffrey while posing as Frannie. The resulting misunderstandings provide the basis for comedy directed at younger teens. The authors write in a completely gay-friendly vein, promoting tolerance among their readers. They tell the story in first person throughout, in alternating chapters. It's an emotionally sensitive light comedy, which will appeal most directly to those absorbed with beginning romantic relationships. Although it may be too lengthy for readers who fall outside that category, it should appeal successfully to its target audience. (Fiction. 12-15)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101099834
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
10/05/2006
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
302,756
File size:
0 MB
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

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