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The M16
     

The M16

3.0 4
by Gordon L. Rottman
 

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The M16 was first introduced in 1958 and was revolutionary for its time as it was made of lightweight materials including special aluminum and plastics. It was first adopted by US Special Forces and airborne troops in 1962 before it was issued to Army and Marine units serving in Vietnam. Its use spread throughout the following decades and a number of variants

Overview

The M16 was first introduced in 1958 and was revolutionary for its time as it was made of lightweight materials including special aluminum and plastics. It was first adopted by US Special Forces and airborne troops in 1962 before it was issued to Army and Marine units serving in Vietnam. Its use spread throughout the following decades and a number of variants including submachine and carbine versions were also fielded. As a result it is now amongst the three most used combat cartridges in the world while over 10 million M16s and variants have been produced making it one of the most successful American handheld weapons in history .But despite its undeniable success the M16 is not without its detractors. Indeed, the "black rifleÂ??, as it is known, is one of the most controversial rifles ever introduced with a long history of design defects, ruggedness issues, cleaning difficulties and reliability problems leading to endless technical refinements. This volume provides a technical history of the M16 and the struggle to perfect it together with an assessment of its impact on the battlefield drawing on over a decade's combat experience with the rifle.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781849088916
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Publication date:
12/20/2011
Series:
Weapon , #14
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
80
File size:
8 MB

Meet the Author

Gordon L Rottman entered the US Army in 1967, volunteered for Special Forces and completed training as a weapons specialist. He served in the 5th Special Forces Group in Vietnam in 1969Â?70 and subsequently in airborne infantry, long-range patrol and intelligence assignments until retiring after 26 years. He was a Special Operations Forces scenario writer at the Joint Readiness Training Center for 12 years and is now a freelance writer, living in Texas.
Gordon L. Rottman entered the US Army in 1967, volunteered for Special Forces and completed training as a weapons specialist. He served in the 5th Special Forces Group in Vietnam in 1969Â?70 and subsequently in airborne infantry, long-range patrol and intelligence assignments until retiring after 26 years. He was a Special Operations Forces scenario writer at the Joint Readiness Training Center for 12 years and is now a freelance writer, living in Texas.
Johnny Shumate works as a freelance illustrator living in Nashville, Tennessee. He began his career in 1987 after graduating from Austin Peay State University. Most of his work is rendered in Adobe Photoshop using a Cintiq monitor. His greatest influences are Angus McBride, Don Troiani, and Ã?douard Detaille.

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The M16 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Dynamtic More than 1 year ago
Good history on the m16 rifle . Easy to read .
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hey x-ar-15 m16 platform guy tell that to a truck full of navy SEALs armed with m4's!those platforms are frikin BA!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Tell that to the marines in a humvee killing terrorist so they dont come 2 the u.s and blow ur house up.so quit talking u poc .anyways if ur so good at guns........then how come nobody uses the f.a.l anymore
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I always have hated the M16/AR-15 platform. The 5.56 is equal to the .223 as the 7.62 about a 30'06. So I like the AR-10 better and the SA-58 FN FAL. (Both 7.62) Do not care for the M9 ethier.