The Mabinogion by Lady Charlotte E. Guest | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Mabinogion

Mabinogion

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by Charlotte Guest, Jo Nathan
     
 

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The Mabinogion is the title given to a collection of eleven prose stories collated from medieval Welsh manuscripts. The tales draw on pre-Christian Celtic mythology, international folktale motifs, and early medieval historical traditions. While some details may hark back to older Iron Age traditions, each of these tales is the product of a highly developed medieval

Overview

The Mabinogion is the title given to a collection of eleven prose stories collated from medieval Welsh manuscripts. The tales draw on pre-Christian Celtic mythology, international folktale motifs, and early medieval historical traditions. While some details may hark back to older Iron Age traditions, each of these tales is the product of a highly developed medieval Welsh narrative tradition, both oral and written. Lady Charlotte Guest in the mid 19th century was the first to publish English translations of the collection, popularising the name "Mabinogion" at the same time.

Lady Charlotte Elizabeth Guest, (née Bertie) (19 May 1812 - 15 January 1895), later Lady Charlotte Schreiber, was an English translator and business woman. An important figure in the study of Welsh language and literature, she is best known for her pioneering translation into English of the major medieval work, the Mabinogion.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780947992439
Publisher:
LLanerch Publishers
Publication date:
12/31/1990
Pages:
107

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PEEEDUR THE SON OF EVEAWC. TT1ARL EVRAWC owned the Earldom of the North. And -- he had seven sons. And Evrawc maintained himself not so much by his own possessions as by attending tournaments, and wars, and combats. And, as it often befalls those who join in encounters and wars, he was slain, and six of his sons likewise. Now the name of his seventh son was Peredur, and he was the youngest of them. And he was not of an age to go to wars and encounters, otherwise he might have been slain as well as his father and brothers. His mother was a scheming and thoughtful woman, and she was very solicitous concerning this her only son and his possessions. So she took counsel with herself to leave the inhabited country, and to flee to the deserts and unfrequented wildernesses. And she permitted none to bear her company thither but women and boys, and spiritless men, who were both unaccustomed and unequal to war and fighting. And none dared to bring either horses or arms where her son was, lest he should set his mind upon them. And the youth went daily to divert himself inthe forest, by flinging sticks and staves. And one day he saw his mother's flock of goats, and near the goats two hinds were standing. And he marvelled greatly that these two should be without horns, while the others had them. And he thought they had long run wild, and on that account they had lost their horns. And by activity and swiftness of foot, he drove the hinds and the goats together into the house which there was for the goats at the extremity of the forest. Then Peredur returned to his mother. " Ah, mother," said he, " a marvellous thing have I seen in the wood; two of thy goats have run wild, and lost their horns;through their having been so long missing in the wood. And no man had ever more trouble than I...

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