Mac OS X Leopard: The Missing Manual [NOOK Book]

Overview

With Leopard, Apple has unleashed the greatest version of Mac OS X yet, and David Pogue is back with another meticulous Missing Manual to cover the operating system with a wealth of detail. The new Mac OS X 10.5, better known as Leopard, is faster than its predecessors, but nothing's too fast for Pogue and this Missing Manual. It's just one of reasons this is the most popular computer book of all time.

Mac OS X: The Missing Manual, Leopard ...

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Mac OS X Leopard: The Missing Manual

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Overview

With Leopard, Apple has unleashed the greatest version of Mac OS X yet, and David Pogue is back with another meticulous Missing Manual to cover the operating system with a wealth of detail. The new Mac OS X 10.5, better known as Leopard, is faster than its predecessors, but nothing's too fast for Pogue and this Missing Manual. It's just one of reasons this is the most popular computer book of all time.

Mac OS X: The Missing Manual, Leopard Edition is the authoritative book for Mac users of all technical levels and experience. If you're new to the Mac, this book gives you a crystal-clear, jargon-free introduction to the Dock, the Mac OS X folder structure, and the Mail application. There are also mini-manuals on iLife applications such as iMovie, iDVD, and iPhoto, and a tutorial for Safari, Mac's web browser.

This Missing Manual is amusing and fun to read, but Pogue doesn't take his subject lightly. Which new Leopard features work well and which do not? What should you look for? What should you avoid? Mac OS X: The Missing Manual, Leopard Edition offers an objective and straightforward instruction for using:

  • Leopard's totally revamped Finder
  • Spaces to group your windows and organize your Mac tasks
  • Quick Look to view files before you open them
  • The Time Machine, Leopard's new backup feature
  • Spotlight to search for and find anything in your Mac
  • Front Row, a new way to enjoy music, photos, and videos
  • Enhanced Parental Controls that come with Leopard
  • Quick tips for setting up and configuring your Mac to make it your own
There's something new on practically every page of this new edition, and David Pogue brings his celebrated wit and expertise to every one of them. Mac's brought a new cat to town and Mac OS X: The Missing Manual, Leopard Edition is a great new way to tame it.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780596554569
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 12/7/2007
  • Series: Missing Manual Series
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 912
  • Sales rank: 1,091,258
  • File size: 16 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

David Pogue, Yale '85, is the weekly personal-technology columnist for the New York Times and an Emmy award-winning tech correspondent for CBS News. His funny tech videos appear weekly on CNBC. And with 3 million books in print, he is also one of the world's bestselling how- to authors. He wrote or co-wrote seven books in the "For Dummies" series (including Macs, Magic, Opera, and Classical Music). In 1999, he launched his own series of amusing, practical, and user-friendly computer books called Missing Manuals, which now includes 100 titles.

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Table of Contents

The Missing Credits; About the Author; About the Creative Team; Acknowledgments; The Missing Manual Series; For Starters; Introduction; What's New in Leopard; About This Book; The Very Basics; Part I: The Mac OS X Desktop; Chapter 1: Folders and Windows; 1.1 Getting into Mac OS X; 1.2 Windows and How to Work Them; 1.3 The Four Window Views; 1.4 Icon View; 1.5 List View; 1.6 Column View; 1.7 Cover Flow View; 1.8 Quick Look; 1.9 Logging Out, Shutting Down; 1.10 Getting Help in Mac OS X; Chapter 2: Organizing Your Stuff; 2.1 The Mac OS X Folder Structure; 2.2 Icon Names; 2.3 Selecting Icons; 2.4 Moving and Copying Icons; 2.5 Color Labels; 2.6 The Trash; 2.7 Get Info; Chapter 3: Spotlight; 3.1 The Spotlight Menu; 3.2 The Spotlight Window; 3.3 Customizing Spotlight; 3.4 Smart Folders; Chapter 4: Dock, Desktop, and Toolbars; 4.1 The Dock; 4.2 Setting Up the Dock; 4.3 Using the Dock; 4.4 The Finder Toolbar; 4.5 Designing Your Desktop; 4.6 Menulets: The Missing Manual; Part II: Programs in Mac OS X; Chapter 5: Documents, Programs, and Spaces; 5.1 Opening Mac OS X Programs; 5.2 The "Heads-Up" Program Switcher; 5.3 Exposé: Death to Window Clutter; 5.4 Spaces: Your Free Quad-Display Mac; 5.5 Hiding Programs the Old-Fashioned Way; 5.6 How Documents Know Their Parents; 5.7 Keyboard Control; 5.8 The Save and Open Dialog Boxes; 5.9 Two Kinds of Programs: Cocoa and Carbon; 5.10 The Cocoa Difference; 5.11 Universal Apps (Intel Macs); 5.12 Installing Mac OS X Programs; 5.13 Dashboard; 5.14 Web Clips: Make Your Own Widgets; Chapter 6: Time Machine, Syncing, and Moving Data; 6.1 Moving Data Between Documents; 6.2 Exchanging Data with Other Macs; 6.3 Exchanging Data with Windows PCs; 6.4 Time Machine; 6.5 iSync; 6.6 .Mac Sync; Chapter 7: Automator and AppleScript; 7.1 Introducing Automator; 7.2 Building Your Own Workflow; 7.3 Doing More with Automator; 7.4 Workflows as Programs and Plug-ins; 7.5 Getting Started with AppleScript; Chapter 8: Windows on Macintosh; 8.1 Boot Camp; 8.2 Windows in a Window; Part III: The Components of Mac OS X; Chapter 9: System Preferences; 9.1 The System Preferences Window; 9.2 .Mac; 9.3 Accounts; 9.4 Appearance; 9.5 Bluetooth; 9.6 CDs & DVDs; 9.7 Date & Time; 9.8 Desktop & Screen Saver; 9.9 Displays; 9.10 Dock; 9.11 Energy Saver; 9.12 Exposé & Spaces; 9.13 International; 9.14 Keyboard & Mouse; 9.15 Network; 9.16 Parental Controls; 9.17 Print & Fax; 9.18 QuickTime; 9.19 Security; 9.20 Sharing; 9.21 Software Update; 9.22 Sound; 9.23 Speech; 9.24 Spotlight; 9.25 Startup Disk; 9.26 Time Machine; 9.27 Universal Access; Chapter 10: The Free Programs; 10.1 Your Free Mac OS X Programs; 10.2 Address Book; 10.3 AppleScript; 10.4 Automator; 10.5 Calculator; 10.6 Chess; 10.7 Dashboard; 10.8 Dictionary; 10.9 DVD Player; 10.10 Exposé; 10.11 Font Book; 10.12 Front Row; 10.13 GarageBand; 10.14 iCal; 10.15 iChat; 10.16 iDVD; 10.17 Image Capture; 10.18 iMovie, iPhoto; 10.19 iSync; 10.20 iTunes; 10.21 Mail; 10.22 Photo Booth; 10.23 Preview; 10.24 QuickTime Player; 10.25 Safari; 10.26 Stickies; 10.27 System Preferences; 10.28 TextEdit; 10.29 Time Machine; 10.30 Utilities: Your Mac OS X Toolbox; Chapter 11: CDs, DVDs, and iTunes; 11.1 How the Mac Does Disks; 11.2 Burning CDs and DVDs; 11.3 iTunes: The Digital Jukebox; 11.4 DVD Movies; Part IV: The Technologies of Mac OS X; Chapter 12: Accounts, Parental Controls, and Security; 12.1 Introducing Accounts; 12.2 Creating an Account; 12.3 Parental Controls; 12.4 Editing Accounts; 12.5 Setting Up the Login Process; 12.6 Signing In, Logging Out; 12.7 Sharing Across Accounts; 12.8 Fast User Switching; 12.9 Six Mac OS X Security Shields; Chapter 13: Networking, File Sharing, and Screen Sharing; 13.1 Wiring the Network; 13.2 File Sharing; 13.3 Accessing Shared Files; 13.4 Networking with Windows; 13.5 Screen Sharing; 13.6 More Dialing In from the Road; Chapter 14: Printing, Faxing, Fonts, and Graphics; 14.1 Mac Meets Printer; 14.2 Making the Printout; 14.3 Managing Printouts; 14.4 Printer Sharing; 14.5 Faxing; 14.6 PDF Files; 14.7 Fonts—and Font Book; 14.8 ColorSync; 14.9 Graphics in Mac OS X; 14.10 Screen-Capture Keystrokes; Chapter 15: Sound, Movies, and Speech; 15.1 Playing Sounds; 15.2 Recording Sound; 15.3 QuickTime Movies; 15.4 Speech Recognition; 15.5 The Mac Reads to You; 15.6 VoiceOver; 15.7 Ink: Handwriting Recognition; 15.8 Front Row; Chaptttttter 16: The Unix Crash Course; 16.1 Terminal; 16.2 Navigating in Unix; 16.3 Working with Files and Directories; 16.4 Online Help; 16.5 Terminal Preferences; 16.6 Terminal Tips and Tricks; 16.7 Changing Permissions with Terminal; 16.8 20 Useful Unix Utilities; 16.9 Putting It Together; Chapter 17: Hacking Mac OS X; 17.1 TinkerTool: Customization 101; 17.2 Redoing Mac OS X's Graphics; 17.3 Replacing the Finder Icons; 17.4 Rewriting the Words; 17.5 Your Bright Hacking Future; Part V: Mac OS Online; Chapter 18: Internet Setup; 18.1 The Best News You've Heard All Day; 18.2 Network Central—and Multihoming; 18.3 Broadband Connections; 18.4 Dial-up Modem Connections; 18.5 Switching Locations; 18.6 .Mac Services; 18.7 Internet Location Files; Chapter 19: Mail and Address Book; 19.1 Setting Up Mail; 19.2 Checking Your Mail; 19.3 Writing Messages; 19.4 Stationery; 19.5 Reading Email; 19.6 The Anti-Spam Toolkit; 19.7 RSS Feeds; 19.8 Notes; 19.9 To Dos; 19.10 Address Book; Chapter 20: Safari; 20.1 Safari; 20.2 RSS: The Missing Manual; Chapter 21: iChat; 21.1 Welcome to iChat; 21.2 Three Chat Networks; 21.3 Signing Up; 21.4 The Buddy Lists; 21.5 Making a List; 21.6 Let the Chat Begin; 21.7 Text Chatting; 21.8 Audio Chats; 21.9 Video Chats; 21.10 Sharing Your Screen; 21.11 iChat Theater; 21.12 iChat Tweaks; Chapter 22: SSH, FTP, VPN, and Web Sharing; 22.1 Web Sharing; 22.2 FTP; 22.3 Connecting from the Road; 22.4 Remote Access with SSH; 22.5 Virtual Private Networking; Part VI: Appendixes; Appendix A: Installing Mac OS X 10.5; Getting Ready to Install; Four Kinds of Installation; The Basic Installation; The Upgrade Installation; The Clean Install ("Archive and Install"); Erase & Install; The Setup Assistant; Uninstalling Mac OS X 10.5; Appendix B: Troubleshooting; Minor Eccentric Behavior; Frozen Programs (Force Quitting); Can't Move or Rename an Icon; Application Won't Open; Startup Problems; Fixing the Disk; Where to Get Troubleshooting Help; Appendix C: The Windows-to-Mac Dictionary; About [This Program]; Accessibility Options control panel; Active Desktop; Add Hardware control panel; Add or Remove Programs control panel; All Programs; Alt key; Automatic Update; Backspace key; Battery Level; BIOS; Briefcase; Calculator; Camera and Scanner Wizard; CDs; Character Map; Clean Install; Clipboard; Command line; Control Panel; Copy, Cut, Paste; Ctrl key; Date and Time; Delete Key (Forward Delete); Desktop; Directories; Disk Defragmenter; Disks; Display control panel; DLL files; DOS prompt; Drivers; End Task dialog box; Exiting programs; Explorer; Favorites; Faxing; File Sharing; Floppy disks; Folder Options; Fonts; Help and Support; Hibernation; Internet Explorer; Internet Options; IRQs; Java; Keyboard control panel; Logging in; Mail control panel; Maximize button; Menus; Minimize button; Mouse control panel; My Computer; My Documents, My Pictures, My Music; My Network Places; Network Neighborhood; Notepad; Personal Web Server; Phone and Modem Options control panel; Power Options; Printer Sharing; Printers and Faxes; PrntScrn key; Program Files folder; Properties dialog box; Recycle Bin; Regional and Language Options control panel; Registry; Run command; Safe Mode; ScanDisk; Scheduled Tasks; Scrap files; Screen saver; Search; Shortcut menus; Shortcuts; Sounds and Audio Devices; Speech control panel; Standby mode; Start menu; StartUp folder; System control panel; System Tray; Taskbar; Taskbar and Start Menu control panel; "Three-fingered salute"; ToolTips; TweakUI; User Accounts control panel; Window edges; Windows (or WINNT) folder; Windows logo key; Windows Media Player; Windows Messenger; WordPad; Zip files; Appendix D: Where to Go From Here; Web Sites; Free Email Newsletters; Advanced Books, Programming Books; Appendix E: The Master Mac OS X Secret Keystroke List; Colophon;

David Pogue is one of America's best-selling how-to authors, with nearly 3 million books in print. David is the creator of the Missing Manual series and the weekly computer columnist for The New York Times.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 20 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2008

    A reviewer

    I just converted from Windows the Mac and got a 24 in. iMac with all the fixin's. Got used to the basics for the first couple of weeks, but I really wanted to learn how to use ALL of the wonderful features this amazing computer has to offer. This book not only answered ALL of my questions, it kept my attention, unlike the cut-and-dry manuals you usually see. Any mac owner knows the lack of real help you can get from apple.com. This book has it ALL and then some. Trust me, if you own a Mac, you NEED this book. I don't care how much you think you know, this will turn a user of any level into a POWER-USER. :'

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2008

    Demystify Leopard here!

    Book Title: The Missing Manual - Mac OS X Leopard Edition Author: David Pogue Publisher: Pogue Press ¿ O¿Reilly Media, Inc. Publish Date: December 2007 ISBN-10: 0-596-52952-X ISBN-13: 978-0-596-52952-9 Reviewed by: Curt Blanchard ¿ Tucson Macintosh Users Group (4/1/08) Panther and Tiger and, now Leopard, oh my! With each cat comes a slew of new features to master and Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard is no kitten ¿ it¿s a seriously big update. Rest your fears, however, because our favorite lion tamer, David Pogue has come to our rescue with the Leopard Edition of the Missing Manual series from O¿Reilly Media. This new edition weighs in at nearly 900 pages but don¿t let that put you off - books like this aren¿t meant to be read like a novel, they are true reference guides designed to ease the transition into a new operating system. If you have a question about something specific, a quick look at the extensive 23 page index permits you find your answer efficiently. This is much more than a What¿s New book. Pogue started the Mac OS Missing Manual series long ago and updates them with each new OS update. The book begins with the very basics and covers the Desktop, Organization, Spotlight, Included Programs, the Technologies of Mac OS X and wraps up with an excellent section covering Online applications, navigation and use. For those who are upgrading their current machines to Leopard, there is a clearly written appendix that deals with installation of the new operating system. This section alone is worth buying the book. Pogue¿s tongue-in-cheek sense of humor shines through the technicalities making for an entertaining experience rather than an onerous one. This is why I¿m a fan - I¿m a manual guy, I like to sit down and read about what I¿m doing in order to understand it. I just cannot get the same satisfaction from onscreen Help menus and manuals that arrive on a CD. That is precisely why Pogue started the Missing Manual series ¿ ¿The book that should have been in the box¿. No qualms here, I highly recommend this book. It belongs on your bookshelf you¿ll find yourself referring to it often.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 28, 2009

    An excellent resource for need to know information.

    As a recent convert from PC to Mac, I found this book to be an excellent source of information. Mr. Pogue's writing is easy to follow, and the book's layout allows the reader to zero in on specific topics. Before settling on this book I looked at several others. Unfortunately, many of them read like a textbook, provided a lot more information than I felt I needed to know initially (if ever), and were more expensive. If you're looking for a book that digs deep into the Mac's UNIX underbelly, then this isn't the book for you. If you're looking for a book to provide you with the tools and information you need to know to transitionn to Mac or OS X, then this one will be hard to beat.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2008

    The Best Keeps Getting Better

    I have been in the IT field for over 33 years and have always appreciated clear documentation. After reading the first 4 pages of Mac OS X Leopard, The Missing Manual, I know this will be exactly what I expected: Not just clear directions and useful information, but information explained as it should be - based on what the reader already knows. Great job, David!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2008

    Leaping Ahead with Leopard

    First up I have to declare a bias towards this author. I first purchased one of his books a few years ago when I wanted to learn more about my iMac 350 slot loader which was causing me a lot of grief at the time. While David Pogue didn¿t provide the answer to my woes, I certainly found out everything the old iMac could do, and was entertained along the way. So when I purchased a second hand eMac running OS X, my first move was to purchase the Tiger edition of the Missing Manual series. This book greatly helped my transition from OS 9 to OS X and meticulously explained the most comprehensive contents of OS X Tiger. David Pogue¿s newest work, the Leopard Edition of the Missing Manual series is even bigger than the Tiger Edition, sporting 56 more pages, at 893 pages, and is 45 mm thick. Fortunately, for a book this big, it opens flat at any page, and stays at that page without having weigh it down, a very useful attribute for a book of this kind. David Pogue continues with his breezy, light-hearted style, which makes reading the book a pleasure, rather than a chore. While David is obviously a Mac fan, this doesn¿t prevent him from pointing out Apple¿s omissions, inconsistencies, or oversights. The book is arranged in six parts, The Mac OS X Desktop, Programs in OS X, The components of OS X, the technologies of OS X, Mac OS Online, and Appendixes. Each part provides a wealth of information about every aspect of OS X. As I have recently purchased a new iMac, running OS X Leopard, I welcomed the opportunity to review the Leopard edition of this series. To review a book this big would require a lot time, so I decided to put the book to the test to learn about something that was completely new to me Time Machine. Having read the section on Time Machine from start to finish I reckoned I had a pretty good idea what it all about. (I wish the user guide for my back up hard disc had been as easy to read and understand). Just as David had described, Time Machine responded to the connection of the external hard disc by offering to use it as the back up. One click later I was under way, at last all my computer¿s contents will be backed up without me having to remember to do it. Using the manual as a guide I poked around Time Machine, looking at its preferences and options. Even checked on the back up hard disc¿s files to make sure it was working. I found no surprises, everything was as described in the manual. Now for the acid test. I deliberately deleted a file, then followed the manual¿s guide on how to restore it. Again, no surprises, following the manual, the file was restored to its rightful home without any problems. (Time Machine is a wonderful innovation.) Now I have to admit, Time Machine quite straight forward to use, but all the same, Pogue¿s description and instructions were without fault. They are easy to read and understand, don¿t leave one wondering about any aspect of the task, and give one confidence to proceed with the task. Flipping the book open at any page will often reveal a tip or hint that will speed your work or disclose a feature you weren¿t aware of. A book like this is an indispensible tool for any Mac owner. Without it one is just skimming the surface of OS X.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2010

    The title says it all.

    With a brand new MAC and no experience with a MAC this manual has been most helpful.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 11, 2009

    Mac Os X Leopard, The Missing Manual

    Mac Os X Leopard, The Missing Manual is a must for everyone who uses this system. I have learned to easily reconfigure the mouse, set up Expose and Spaces and in general navigate in a more organized way. I'm doing a lot less clicking and looking for windows, dialogs and applications. I'm actually starting to look like I know what I'm doing. ( I used to be a PC user). If I want to learn about an application I can go right to that chapter in the book and in minutes understand what it's about. Keyboard shortcuts are abundant and easy to reconfigure. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to use more of the great innovations that have gone into all computers in the last few years and become more organized at the same time.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2009

    Useful 'manual'

    This Missing Manual is a really great resource to have.

    If you have questions about Mac OS X Leopard, then this book has the answers.

    And if you want to learn more 'computer skills' this is the book too.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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