Mac OSX Panther for Unix Geeks

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Overview

With its rep for being the sort of machine that won't intimidate even the most inexperienced users, what's the appeal of the Mac® for hard-core geeks? The Mac has always been an efficient tool, pleasant to use and customize, and eminently hackable. But now with Mac OS® X's BSD core, many a Unix® developer has found it irresistible. The latest version of Mac OS X, called Panther, makes it even easier for users to delve into the underlying Unix operating system. In fact, you can port Linux® and Unix applications ...

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Overview

With its rep for being the sort of machine that won't intimidate even the most inexperienced users, what's the appeal of the Mac® for hard-core geeks? The Mac has always been an efficient tool, pleasant to use and customize, and eminently hackable. But now with Mac OS® X's BSD core, many a Unix® developer has found it irresistible. The latest version of Mac OS X, called Panther, makes it even easier for users to delve into the underlying Unix operating system. In fact, you can port Linux® and Unix applications and run them side-by-side with your native Aqua® apps right on the Mac desktop.

Still, even experienced Unix users may find themselves in surprisingly unfamiliar territory as they set out to explore Mac OS X. Even if you know Macs through and through, Mac OS X Panther is unlike earlier Macs, and it's radically different from the Unix you've used before.

Enter Mac OS X Panther for Unix Geeks by Brian Jepson and Ernest E. Rothman, two Unix geeks who found themselves in the same place you are. The new edition of this book is your guide to figuring out the BSD Unix system and Panther-specific components that you may find challenging. This concise book will ease you into the Unix innards of Mac OS X Panther, covering such topics as:

  • A quick overview of the Terminal application, including Terminal alternatives like iTerm and GLterm
  • Understanding Open Directory (LDAP) and NetInfo
  • Issues related to using the GNU C Compiler (GCC)
  • Library linking and porting Unix software
  • An overview of Mac OS X Panther's filesystem and startup processes
  • Creating and installing packages using Fink and Darwin Ports
  • Building the Darwin kernel
  • Using the Apple® X11 distribution for running X Windows® applications on top of Mac OS X

The book wraps up with a quick manpage-style reference to the "Missing Manual Pages" —commands that come with Mac OS X Panther, although there are no manpages.

If you find yourself disoriented by the new Mac environment, Mac OS X Panther for Unix Geeks will get you acclimated quickly to the foreign new areas of a familiar Unix landscape.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780596006075
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/28/2004
  • Edition description: Second Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 383
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.18 (h) x 0.92 (d)

Meet the Author

Brian Jepson is an O'Reilly editor, programmer, and co-author of Mac OS X Panther for Unix Geeks and Learning Unix for Mac OS X Panther. He's also a volunteer system administrator and all-around geek for AS220, a non-profit arts center in Providence, Rhode Island. AS220 gives Rhode Island artists uncensored and unjuried forums for their work. These forums include galleries, performance space, and publications. Brian sees to it that technology, especially free software, supports that mission.

Ernest E. Rothman is a Professor of Mathematics at Salve Regina University (SRU) in Newport, Rhode Island, where he is also Chair of the Mathematical Sciences Department. Ernie holds a PhD in Applied Mathematics from Brown University and held positions at the Cornell Theory Center in Ithaca, New York, before coming to SRU. His interests are in scientific computing, applied mathematics and computational science education, and the Unix underpinnings of Mac OS X. Ernie lives in South Kingston, Rhode Island with his wife Kim and two Newfoundland dogs Max and Joe. You can keep abreast of his latest activities at http://homepage.mac.com/samchops.

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Table of Contents

Preface;
Audience for This Book;
Organization of This Book;
Xcode Tools;
Where to Go for More Information;
Conventions Used in This Book;
Comments and Questions;
Acknowledgments from the Previous Edition;
Acknowledgments from Brian Jepson;
Acknowledgments from Ernest E. Rothman;
Getting Around;
Chapter 1: Inside the Terminal;
1.1 Mac OS X Shells;
1.2 The Terminal and xterm Compared;
1.3 Using the Terminal;
1.4 Customizing the Terminal;
1.5 The Services Menu;
1.6 Alternative Terminal Applications;
1.7 The open Command;
Chapter 2: Startup;
2.1 Booting Mac OS X;
2.2 Adding Startup Items;
2.3 Scheduling Tasks;
Chapter 3: Directory Services;
3.1 Understanding Directory Services;
3.2 Programming with Directory Services;
3.3 Configuring Directory Services;
3.4 NetInfo Manager;
3.5 Directory Services Utilities;
3.6 Managing Groups;
3.7 Managing Users and Passwords;
3.8 Managing Hostnames and IP Addresses;
3.9 Exporting Directories with NFS;
3.10 Flat Files and Their Directory Services Counterparts;
3.11 Restoring the Directory Services Database;
Chapter 4: Printing;
4.1 Printer Setup Utility;
4.2 Common Unix Printing System (CUPS);
4.3 Gimp-Print;
Chapter 5: The X Window System;
5.1 About Apple’s X11;
5.2 Installing X11;
5.3 Running X11;
5.4 Customizing X11;
5.5 X11-based Applications and Libraries;
5.6 Connecting to Other X Window Systems;
5.7 Virtual Network Computer;
Chapter 6: Multimedia;
6.1 Burning CDs;
6.2 Video;
6.3 Image Editing;
6.4 3D Modeling;
Chapter 7: Third-Party Tools and Applications;
7.1 Virtual Desktops and Screens;
7.2 The Application Menu;
7.3 Exposé;
7.4 Virtual Desktops;
7.5 SSH GUIs;
7.6 RAqua;
Building Applications;
Chapter 8: Compiling Source Code;
8.1 Compiler Differences;
8.2 Compiling Unix Source Code;
8.3 Architectural Issues;
8.4 X11-Based Applications and Libraries;
Chapter 9: Libraries, Headers, and Frameworks;
9.1 Header Files;
9.2 The System Library: libSystem;
9.3 Shared Libraries Versus Loadable Modules;
9.4 Library Versions;
9.5 Creating and Linking Static Libraries;
9.6 Creating Frameworks;
9.7 Prebinding;
9.8 Performance and Debugging Tools;
9.9 CHUD Tools;
9.10 Interesting and Important Libraries;
9.11 Numerical Libraries;
Chapter 10: Perl;
10.1 Perl for Mac OS X Geeks;
10.2 Installing CPAN Modules;
10.3 Compiling Your Own Perl;
Working with Packages;
Chapter 11: Fink;
11.1 Installing Fink;
11.2 Using Fink;
11.3 FinkCommander;
11.4 Installing Binaries;
Chapter 12: Creating and Installing Packages;
12.1 Using PackageMaker;
12.2 Using GNU tar;
12.3 Disk Images;
12.4 Creating Fink Packages;
Serving and System Management;
Chapter 13: Using Mac OS X as a Server;
13.1 Getting Connected;
13.2 LDAP;
13.3 Postfix;
13.4 Built-in Services: The Sharing Panel;
Chapter 14: MySQL and PostgreSQL;
14.1 MySQL;
14.2 PostgreSQL;
14.3 PHP and Perl;
Chapter 15: System Management Tools;
15.1 Diagnostic Utilities;
15.2 Kernel Utilities;
15.3 System Configuration;
15.4 Third-Party Applications;
Appendixes;
The Mac OS X Filesystem;
Files and Directories;
Command-Line Tools: The Missing Manpages;
Mac OS X’s Unix Development Tools;
Standard Unix Development Tools;
Apple’s Command-Line Developer Tools;
Macintosh Tools;
Java Development Tools;
Text Editing and Processing;
Scripting and Shell Programming;
Working with Files and Directories;
File Compression and Storage;
Searching and Sorting;
Miscellaneous Tools;
Colophon;

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2004

    Makes a Mac Attractive

    For many years, Mac and unix users lived in parallel universes. The operating systems were totally different and the fans of either tended to hark from different fields. Well, ever since Apply redid its Mac to use the Mach kernel, now a Mac runs a dialect of unix. No less inferior than any other version. In some ways, this book is interesting in how it caters to the unix crowd. The book has numerous screen captures of the OS X UI. It sure is pretty! Even unix geeks ought to appreciate this. Graphics-wise, perhaps the closest overlap of the unix and Mac experiences comes in the book's chapter on X Windows [=X11]. Most unix versions use X11 to implement their GUIs. The chapter shows the X11 treatment on the Mac to be very seamless. Though the Mac actually uses Quartz to make its GUI, an X11 development kit is provided, that will satisfy any X11 developer. Unix is distinguished from traditional Mac or Microsoft OSes by emphasising a command line, and very powerful utilities that are often accessed via this command line. Panther gives you most of the common unix utilities in this customary environment. Overall, unix fans might like this book for its presentation of a very cohesively integrated system that is perhaps easier to use than any other unix or linux offering.

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