Machine Tool Practices / Edition 9

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Overview

Machine Tool Practices, 9e, effectively provides a concise overview of machine tools and related methods and practices that are found in a number of different industry types that utilize various machining processes. The style of writing and illustrating, combined with the authors’ practical experience and knowledge, has yielded a text that can be read and understood by engineers and technicians alike.”

Murray Therrell, Industrial Mechanical Systems Instructor, Arkansas Northeastern College

The Definitive Text!

For over 30 years, Machine Tool Practice, 9e, has served as the definitive text to successfully train computer numerical controllers (CNC) and conventional machine operators, general machinists, and tool and tie makers. The book lends itself well to classes that take a combined lecture/laboratory approach, as well as those using it in a self-paced environment.

With over 1500 line drawings and 600 new photographs, Machine Tool Practices, 9e, is the best illustrated book in this field. The text emphasizes practical knowledge shop and machine tool technology throughout. The text superbly illustrates the tools, equipment and techniques that students are most likely to encounter in an actual industrial machine shop environment.

New to this Edition

Updated to reflect the very latest trends and technology in the machine tool field, the art program in this ninth edition has been completely modernized to reflect the real world environment. In addition, this edition has been accuracy checked and also features:

  • Expanded CNC content
  • Additional CAM coverage
  • A new self-test question set in each chapter
  • A list of useful websites at the end of appropriate units that refer the reader to state of the art information on cutting tools and machine shop equipment

“This book has been the standard for my 30 years experience both as machinist and machining instructor- a proven benchmark as an excellent comprehensive text. This new edition keeps up with new advances in machining and related fields while still providing the solid core of fundamental knowledge, building upon it in a very logical manner”

Richard Granlund, Faculty-Machine Tool, Hennepin Technical College, Brooklyn Park, Minnesota

“As the field of machining is constantly changing, a current textbook is critical. [This author team] takes extra care to make this happen.” William Julien, Assistant Professor, Civil, Construction, Industrial and Mechanical Technologies, Hudson Valley Community College

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
New edition of a text for students training to be machinists either through apprenticeship, vocational schools, or community college programs. Dense with information, illustrations, and self tests (with answers). No bibliography. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780135015087
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 7/29/2009
  • Series: Pearson Construction Technology Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 9
  • Pages: 816
  • Sales rank: 396,758
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 10.90 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Richard R. Kibbe served his apprenticeship in the shipbuilding industry and was graduated as a journeyman marine machinist. He holds an Associate in Arts degree in applied arts from Yuba Community College with an emphasis in machine tool technology. He also holds Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from the California State University with an emphasis in machine tool manufacturing technology.

Mr. Kibbe has considerable job machine shop experience as well as community college and industrial teaching experience and is the author and co-author of several publications in the chain tool manufacturing field.

Roland O. Meyer spent the first 20 years of his career in the metal-working industry as a tool and die maker, machinist and worked in machine design and manufacturing. He completed his apprenticeship as a tool and die maker at Siemens in Germany and continued there as a journeyman building progressive punching dies.

He then worked in die shops in Toronto and Windsor, Canada before moving to Chicago employed as a gage maker at Ford Motor Company. Following this stint, he was in charge of the US army machine shops in Korea and Italy for five years. When he returned to the US, he worked in a manufacturing company designing and building experimental machines used in the timber and plywood industry. He next entered academia and became the lead instructor at Lane Community College’s Manufacturing Technology program in Eugene, Oregon, where he taught for 25 years. As CNC became the new method in machining, he developed a CNC curriculum and program. When CAM (Computer Aided Machining) became available he also developed a state of the art CAM program with the assistance of a local software company.

John E. Neely grew up in the Pacific Northwest and entered the Army to serve in World War II. The life John E. Neely is characterized by hard work, a variety of successes, and mentoring many others who became a part of his life.

Over the years Mr. Neely provided himself with a broad education and professional training through reading, a correspondence course in mechanical engineering, and good use of opportunities throughout his career. He became a master machinist, a mechanical engineer, a hydraulic engineer, and eventually an instructor at Lane Community College in Eugene, Oregon.

During his time as instructor he collaborated with others to develop highly successful course materials based on the individualized instruction approach. He and his collaborators wrote and had published several textbooks based on those materials. Those books continue to be in use nationally and internationally. After the death of his wife, he moved to Colorado Springs, Colorado, in April 2000 to be with his son and his family. There, for the three years until his death, he enjoyed the company of family and friends.

Warren White apprenticed as an Optical Instrument Maker with Land-Air, Inc. After military service with the Army Air Defense Board he obtained a graduate degree in Psychology at Clark University. His interest in both learning theory and machine tools led to employment at Foothill College in the Engineering Department.

Warren White initiated the Machine Tool Technology program at De Anza College after an extensive survey of Silicon Valley manufacturing firms. He was the Director of a California State-funded program to develop an Individualized Machinist Curriculum in conjunction with several California Community Colleges and Lane Community College in Oregon. He also initiated the California Community Colleges’ Multimediamobile which operated between several California Community Colleges to develop individualized instructional media in several technical disciplines.

He was the lead author and editor for Machine Tools and Machining Practices Volumes I and II published by John Wiley and Sons. He later taught Industrial Engineering classes at San Jose State University. He is certified by the Society of Manufacturing Engineers as a Manufacturing Engineer. After retiring from teaching he did voluntary Assistive Technology work with the Easter Seal Society in Santa Cruz, California, in a special program sponsored by IBM. He returned to work as a Quality Engineer for Seagate Technology, and obtained certification as a Quality Auditor. He started Seagate Technology on the path to achieving ISO 9001 certification.

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Table of Contents

SECTION A

Introduction

Unit 1 Shop Safety

Unit 2 Mechanical Hardware

Unit 3 Reading Drawings

SECTION B

Hand Tools

Unit 1 Arbor and Shop Presses

Unit 2 Work-Holding and Hand Tools

Unit 3 Hacksaws

Unit 4 Files

Unit 5 Hand Reamers

Unit 6 Identification and Uses of Taps

Unit 7 Tapping Procedures

Unit 8 Thread-Cutting Dies and Their Uses

Unit 9 Off-Hand Grinding

SECTION C

Dimensional Measurement

Unit 1 Systems of Measurement

Unit 2 Using Steel Rules

Unit 3 Using Vernier, Dial, and Digital Instruments for Direct Measurements

Unit 4 Using Micrometer Instruments

Unit 5 Using Comparison Measuring Instruments

Unit 6 Using Gage Blocks

Unit 7 Using Angular Measuring Instruments

Unit 8 Tolerances, Fits, Geometric Dimensions, and Statistical Process Control

SECTION D

Materials

Unit 1 Selection and Identification of Steels

Unit 2 Selection and Identification of Nonferrous Metals

Unit 3 Hardening, Case Hardening, and Tempering

Unit 4 Annealing, Normalizing, and Stress Relieving

Unit 5 Rockwell and Brinell Hardness Testers

SECTION E

Layout

Unit 1 Basic Semiprecision Layout Practice

Unit 2 Basic Precision Layout Practice

SECTION F

Preparation for Machining Operations

Unit 1 Machinability and Chip Formation

Unit 2 Speeds and Feeds for Machine Tools

Unit 3 Cutting Fluids

Unit 4 Using Carbides and Other Tool Materials

SECTION G

Sawing Machines

Unit 1 Using Reciprocating and Horizontal Band Cutoff Machines

Unit 2 Abrasive and Cold Saws

Unit 3 Preparing to Use the Vertical Band Machine

Unit 4 Using the Vertical Band Machine

SECTION H

Drilling Machines

Unit 1 The Drill Press

Unit 2 Drilling Tools

Unit 3 Hand Grinding of Drills on the Pedestal Grinder

Unit 4 Operating Drilling Machines

Unit 5 Countersinking and Counterboring

Unit 6 Reaming in the Drill Press

SECTION I

Turning Machines

Unit 1 The Engine Lathe

Unit 2 Toolholders and Toolholding for the Lathe

Unit 3 Cutting Tools for the Lathe

Unit 4 Lathe Spindle Tooling

Unit 5 Operating the Machine Controls

Unit 6 Facing and Center Drilling

Unit 7 Turning between Centers

Unit 8 Alignment of the Lathe Centers

Unit 9 Other Lathe Operations

Unit 10 Sixty-Degree Thread Information and Calculations

Unit 11 Cutting Unified External Threads

Unit 12 Cutting Unified Internal Threads

Unit 13 Cutting Tapers

Unit 14 Using Steady and Follower Rests

Unit 15 Additional Thread Forms

Unit 16 Cutting Acme Threads on the Lathe

SECTION J

Vertical Milling Machines

Unit 1 Vertical Spindle Milling Machines

Unit 2 Cutting Tools and Cutter Holders for the Vertical Milling Machine

Unit 3 Setups on the Vertical Milling Machine

Unit 4 Vertical Milling Machine Operations

Unit 5 Using the Offset Boring Head

SECTION K

Horizontal Spindle Milling Machines

Unit 1 Horizontal Spindle Milling Machines

Unit 2 Types of Spindles, Arbors, and Adapters

Unit 3 Arbor-Driven Milling Cutters

Unit 4 Work-Holding Methods and Standard Setups

Unit 5 Machine Setup and Plain Milling

Unit 6 Using Side Milling Cutters

Unit 7 Using Face Milling Cutters on the Horizontal Milling Machine

SECTION L

Grinding and Abrasive Machining Processes

Unit 1 Selection and Identification of Grinding Wheels

Unit 2 Truing, Dressing, and Balancing of Grinding Wheels

Unit 3 Grinding Fluids

Unit 4 Horizontal Spindle Reciprocating Table Surface Grinders

Unit 5 Work Holding on the Surface Grinder

Unit 6 Using the Surface Grinder

Unit 7 Problems and Solutions in Surface Grinding

Unit 8 Center-Type Cylindrical Grinders

Unit 9 Using the Cylindrical Grinder

Unit 10 Universal Tool and Cutter Grinder

SECTION M

Computer Numerical Control and Other Advanced Machining Processes

Unit 1 CNC Machine Tool Programmable Axes and Position Dimensioning Systems

Unit 2 CNC Programming

Unit 3 CNC Tooling

Unit 4 Other Advanced Machining Processes

Appendix 1 Answers to Self-Tests

Appendix 2 General Tables

Table 1 Decimal Equivalents of Fractional Inches

Table 2 Inch/Metric Conversion Table

Table 3 Tap Drill Sizes

Table 4 Metric Tap Drill Sizes

Table 5A Tapers

Table 5B Tapers and Angles

Table 6 General Measurements

Table 7A Density or Specific Gravity of Metals and Alloys

Table 7B Approximate Melting Points of Metals and Various Substances

Table 8 Right-Triangle Solution Formulas

Table 9 Wire Gages and Metric Equivalents

Table 10 Cutting Speeds for Commonly Used Materials

Table 10A Feeds for High-Speed Steel End Mills

Table 10B Coolants and Cutting Oils Used for General Machining

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Preface

The major objective of this edition, like that of previous editions, is to provide a current and richly illustrated text for those students training to become computer numerical control (CNC) and conventional machine operators, general machinists, or tool and die makers, either through apprenticeship training or community college and vocational programs. The content deals with topics usually presented in a combined lecture/laboratory program. However, the text is designed such that it may also be used in a self-paced instructional environment.

The authors fully realize that the field of machine tools and machining practices has changed greatly over the past few years. Many of the classical processes heretofore considered to be an important component of machinist training are no longer taught or even done in manufacturing, especially in the age of CNC. However, we feel that the content of this edition continues to verbalize and illustrate the major core subject areas of the machinist's education, even though the major thrust of a student's employment may be more oriented toward CNC production machine operation than toward the more general job shop or prototype manufacturing environment.

No matter what directions the field of machine tools and machining practices may take in future years, we remain steadfast in our belief that the content of this edition is both timely and essential to the basic foundation that a student needs to participate effectively in the machining area of manufacturing technology.

To better meet the needs of users of this book, the authors have made a careful study of the entire contents. Many users of previous editions were consultedand their comments incorporated so that this seventh edition could be updated to meet the present-day needs of students and instructors, and current industry training standards. Following are some of the special features included in this textbook:

  • Each section begins with an introductory over-view, followed by instructional units with clearly stated objectives. Instructional units in each section contain easy-to-read information and instructions that accurately reflect the state of the art in industrial machine shop environments.
  • The book is illustrated extensively with many photographs of actual machining operations. We have also taken several major steps in this new edition to improve the quality of the art throughout the text.
  • Graphic explanations are used to highlight important concepts and common errors and difficulties encountered by machinists.
  • Many units are designed around specific projects that provide much of the performance experience for the student. The structure of the book makes it easy for instructors to insert projects that are more applicable to specific individual programs.
  • Self-tests at the end of most units enable students to evaluate their own progress and understanding of the text material. Self-test answers are given in Appendix 1.

Additions and new features in the seventh edition include:

  • New and updated illustrations are included where appropriate.
  • The seventh edition reflects the ever-increasing importance of CNC. This section has been extensively revised and now contains much more material specific to industry-standard conventional code CNC programming, patterned after the most common numerical control formats presently used in the industry. The section has also been reorganized in order to present a more logical topic development. Many new drawings and more detailed explanations of specific programming sequences have been included. Although the coverage is not intended to be as extensive as a dedicated text on CNC, we feel that it is sufficient to give the student a solid start in learning the basics of this popular and growing technology.
  • Shop tips, safety tips, career tips, and new or developing technology are emphasized in color boxes throughout the text. The shop tips are designed to emphasize tricks of the trade and shortcuts that can be invaluable during a student's training. Safety tips emphasize shop and machine safety considerations. New technology and career tips are designed to stimulate a student's interest to pursue further information on the subject.
  • Applications of trigonometry now appear in the text at appropriate points.

Although we have updated this edition to reflect current machining technology, we have preserved essential classical machine shop practice while deleting that which is truly not relevant or no longer used. We believe that the standard machine shop practices that make up the bulk of this edition are still very relevant to the machining technology field, even in this age of high-technology, computer-supported manufacturing. Students of modern machining technology will still require solid backgrounds in standard practice if they are to understand and appreciate computer-controlled and computer-supported machining as well as other high-technology manufacturing processes.

The following materials are available to supplement the textbook:

  • An Instructor's Manual containing suggestions on how to use the textbook for conventional and competency-based education, post-tests, and answer keys. The post-tests can be freely reproduced by users of the book. All Instructor's Manual tests have been edited and reformatted so that test questions more closely correspond to the specific text passages.
  • A workbook titled Workbook for Machine Tool Practices. This adjunct publication plays an extremely important part in maximizing use of the book. The workbook contains process worksheets with projects, alternative projects, and additional tables. These features are keyed to the text material and thus greatly enhance the use of the book as a complete instructional system.

The workbook is project oriented and not just a series of exercises in which the student has no real vested interest. The projects, when completed, are all useful devices and as such, help to motivate students. The workbook, together with Machine Tool Practices, provides an orderly, efficient, and complete teaching system that is quite flexible and easy to set up and use for any machine technology training program. Use of the student workbook is highly recommended.

Richard R. Kibbe
John E. Neely
Roland O. Meyer
Warren T. White

<%END%>
Read More Show Less

Introduction

The major objective of this edition, like that of previous editions, is to provide a current and richly illustrated text for those students training to become computer numerical control (CNC) and conventional machine operators, general machinists, or tool and die makers, either through apprenticeship training or community college and vocational programs. The content deals with topics usually presented in a combined lecture/laboratory program. However, the text is designed such that it may also be used in a self-paced instructional environment.

The authors fully realize that the field of machine tools and machining practices has changed greatly over the past few years. Many of the classical processes heretofore considered to be an important component of machinist training are no longer taught or even done in manufacturing, especially in the age of CNC. However, we feel that the content of this edition continues to verbalize and illustrate the major core subject areas of the machinist's education, even though the major thrust of a student's employment may be more oriented toward CNC production machine operation than toward the more general job shop or prototype manufacturing environment.

No matter what directions the field of machine tools and machining practices may take in future years, we remain steadfast in our belief that the content of this edition is both timely and essential to the basic foundation that a student needs to participate effectively in the machining area of manufacturing technology.

To better meet the needs of users of this book, the authors have made a careful study of the entire contents. Many users of previous editions wereconsulted and their comments incorporated so that this seventh edition could be updated to meet the present-day needs of students and instructors, and current industry training standards. Following are some of the special features included in this textbook:

  • Each section begins with an introductory over-view, followed by instructional units with clearly stated objectives. Instructional units in each section contain easy-to-read information and instructions that accurately reflect the state of the art in industrial machine shop environments.
  • The book is illustrated extensively with many photographs of actual machining operations. We have also taken several major steps in this new edition to improve the quality of the art throughout the text.
  • Graphic explanations are used to highlight important concepts and common errors and difficulties encountered by machinists.
  • Many units are designed around specific projects that provide much of the performance experience for the student. The structure of the book makes it easy for instructors to insert projects that are more applicable to specific individual programs.
  • Self-tests at the end of most units enable students to evaluate their own progress and understanding of the text material. Self-test answers are given in Appendix 1.

Additions and new features in the seventh edition include:

  • New and updated illustrations are included where appropriate.
  • The seventh edition reflects the ever-increasing importance of CNC. This section has been extensively revised and now contains much more material specific to industry-standard conventional code CNC programming, patterned after the most common numerical control formats presently used in the industry. The section has also been reorganized in order to present a more logical topic development. Many new drawings and more detailed explanations of specific programming sequences have been included. Although the coverage is not intended to be as extensive as a dedicated text on CNC, we feel that it is sufficient to give the student a solid start in learning the basics of this popular and growing technology.
  • Shop tips, safety tips, career tips, and new or developing technology are emphasized in color boxes throughout the text. The shop tips are designed to emphasize tricks of the trade and shortcuts that can be invaluable during a student's training. Safety tips emphasize shop and machine safety considerations. New technology and career tips are designed to stimulate a student's interest to pursue further information on the subject.
  • Applications of trigonometry now appear in the text at appropriate points.

Although we have updated this edition to reflect current machining technology, we have preserved essential classical machine shop practice while deleting that which is truly not relevant or no longer used. We believe that the standard machine shop practices that make up the bulk of this edition are still very relevant to the machining technology field, even in this age of high-technology, computer-supported manufacturing. Students of modern machining technology will still require solid backgrounds in standard practice if they are to understand and appreciate computer-controlled and computer-supported machining as well as other high-technology manufacturing processes.

The following materials are available to supplement the textbook:

  • An Instructor's Manual containing suggestions on how to use the textbook for conventional and competency-based education, post-tests, and answer keys. The post-tests can be freely reproduced by users of the book. All Instructor's Manual tests have been edited and reformatted so that test questions more closely correspond to the specific text passages.
  • A workbook titled Workbook for Machine Tool Practices. This adjunct publication plays an extremely important part in maximizing use of the book. The workbook contains process worksheets with projects, alternative projects, and additional tables. These features are keyed to the text material and thus greatly enhance the use of the book as a complete instructional system.

The workbook is project oriented and not just a series of exercises in which the student has no real vested interest. The projects, when completed, are all useful devices and as such, help to motivate students. The workbook, together with Machine Tool Practices, provides an orderly, efficient, and complete teaching system that is quite flexible and easy to set up and use for any machine technology training program. Use of the student workbook is highly recommended.

Richard R. Kibbe
John E. Neely
Roland O. Meyer
Warren T. White

Read More Show Less

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