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Machines Go to Work
     

Machines Go to Work

5.0 1
by William Low, Cobalt Illustrations Studio, Inc (Illustrator)
 

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Toddlers love machines and things that go, and this book gives them everything they want, from a cement mixer to a helicopter to a backhoe. Six interactive gatefolds extend the original pictures to three pages, revealing something new about each situation. The final double gatefold opens into a very long train and shows all the machines at work!

The last spread

Overview

Toddlers love machines and things that go, and this book gives them everything they want, from a cement mixer to a helicopter to a backhoe. Six interactive gatefolds extend the original pictures to three pages, revealing something new about each situation. The final double gatefold opens into a very long train and shows all the machines at work!

The last spread provides additional information about each machine for young readers to pore over again and again.

William Low's classically trained artist's eye adds a new layer to this genre—both parents and children will appreciate the beautiful illustrations, the attention to detail, and the clever situational twists revealed by lifting the flaps.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Here is a fine picture book for little boys who have an innate love of machinery and the noises that big machines make. In fact, the richly colored pages of ‘Machines Go to Work' probably could not be more exactly calibrated to entrance the vehicle-oriented, 2-to-6-year-old male demographic.” —Wall Street Journal

“This design, along with terrific sound effects, encourages listeners to join in the reading…Low's digital art brightly colors each page with slightly impressionistic tones. Let these machines do all the work; the reading about them is pure pleasure.” —The Horn Book Magazine, starred review

“Surprising use of color (a railroad crossing sign lights up against a swirling lavender backdrop) make the mechanical subject matter, always a favorite, spring off the page.” —Publishers Weekly

“A fun and feisty tour of big, powerful and fascinating machines; each of them is ready, willing and eager to ‘go to work.'… The illustrations have a bright, active and brushy effect, and they incorporate a pleasing palette that is heavy on bold primary colors. Low knows what works for kids who like their machines big and busy.” —Kirkus Reviews

“This well-constructed picture book is a surefire hit.” —School Library Journal, Starred Review

“Combining the excitement of powerful machines in action with reminders of how they help humans, Low adds a surprising dimension to the familiar story of vehicles at work. Children mesmerized by the vrooming motion will be drawn by the unframed, double-page spreads and big flaps that open to show overviews and close-ups of trucks, trains, and boats.” —Booklist

“With glorious saturated colors, William Low demonstrates how various vehicles and vessels keep a community operating efficiently.” —Kirkus Reviews

Publishers Weekly

A book about service machines combines seamlessly integrated fold-out pages with delicate artistry. An "Action News helicopter" hovers over traffic, its spinning, lime-green blades a painterly blur. "Is there an accident ahead?" readers are asked. Lifting the full-page flap reveals that, rather, "a family of ducks is crossing the road." Elsewhere, a "shiny red tugboat must hurry. Someone needs help!"; folding out the page shows the tugboat safely pulling a container ship under a drawbridge. Surprising use of color (a railroad crossing sign lights up against a swirling lavender backdrop) make the mechanical subject matter, always a favorite, spring off the page. Ages 2-6. (May)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
With the noise of their operation, Low introduces a series of machines on their way to do their job. For each, he asks a question about what it is going to do. To find the answer, frequently an unexpected one, we must open a fold-out to see. A backhoe is digging, a fire truck is sounding its siren, a helicopter is investigating a traffic problem, a cement mixer has a flat tire, a tugboat is hurrying to help a container ship. The double fold-out finale shows a freight train going, "CLICKETY-CLACK…" along the track in a bird's-eye view panorama in which we can spot the other machines at work. The art created with Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, and Corel Painter seems appropriate for illustrating a machine-dominated world. Realistic images of the action fill the pages, emphasizing the vital operations each machine performs. These are informative portraits and simultaneously esthetically attractive scenes. Cherry blossoms hover over the fire engine; the backhoe digs near a bed of brilliant red tulips; the train clickety-clacks through a multicolored suburban neighborhood. On the final double pages are detailed, labeled pictures of each vehicle included, with added information. See Low himself paint, using the programs mentioned, in a fascinating presentation available on Youtube. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 2

Machinery parades across colorful spreads in this interactive look at equipment. The inventory includes a helicopter, tugboat, cement mixer, and more. The text, one to three lines per spread, is rich in vocabulary. The words and the quality illustrations interact well to portray how each piece of equipment is used in a selected situation. Children will chime in with the "GZZZZZZZZZK!" of the backhoe, the "WWAAAAAWWWWWWWWRRRR!" of the fire engine, and other sounds produced by the equipment. The realistic digital paintings will delight youngsters; spreads alternate with three-page foldouts that show the machines at work. Some reveal unanticipated surprises like a helicopter hovering over a family of ducks crossing a road. The last two pages have small pictures of the machines, descriptions of what they are used for, and labels for selected components. This well-constructed picture book is a surefire hit.-Lynn K. Vanca, Akron-Summit County Public Library, Richfield, OH

Kirkus Reviews
A fun and feisty tour of big, powerful and fascinating machines; each of them is ready, willing and eager to "go to work." Low, the author/illustrator of the New York Times Best Illustrated Book Old Penn Station (2007), employs handsome and painterly computer-generated art to move the text along. Pleasingly onomatopoetic effects mimic the machine sounds: "Gzzzzzzzzzk!" or "HONK! HONK!" Exciting two-page spreads pose a question-"Is there an accident ahead?"-and expand with gatefolds to answer it, revealing in turn a back hoe, cement mixer, fire truck, helicopter, mega tow truck, tugboat and container ship at work. In an exciting climax, a double-gatefold opens to reveal a wonderful four-page spread of a freight ("CLICKETY-CLACK, CLICKETY-CLACK, CLICKETY-CLACK...") train chugging away into the distance as it grows smaller and smaller within a bold expansive landscape. The illustrations have a bright, active and brushy effect, and they incorporate a pleasing palette that is heavy on bold primary colors. Low knows what works for kids who like their machines big and busy. (Picture book. 2-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780805087598
Publisher:
Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
Publication date:
05/12/2009
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
42
Sales rank:
458,059
Product dimensions:
8.20(w) x 10.20(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
2 - 6 Years

Meet the Author

WILLIAM LOW has had a lifelong fascination with machines. He is the author and illustrator of Chinatown and Old Penn Station (a New York Times Best Illustrated Book), as well as the illustrator of Henry and the Kite Dragon by Bruce Edward Hall and Willy and Max by Amy Littlesugar. Mr. Low is a four-time Silver Medal winner at the Society of Illustrators. He teaches at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York.

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Machines Go to Work 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My 2-1/2 year old grandson LOVES this book. Similarly, check out Machines Go to Work in the City which always generates multiple conversations about the pipes under the streets, stoplights, and how other things in the city work.