Mack Dunstan's Inferno

Mack Dunstan's Inferno

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by Paul Collins
     
 

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Mack ‘Max’ Dunstan has played Moses, Marc Anthony, Ben-Hur, President Andrew Jackson, and Long John Silver. He has starred in The Ten Commandments, Ben-Hur, El Cid, 55 Days in Peking, Planet of the Apes, Omega Man, and Soylent Green, to name a few. Sadly, in this age of social media, reality television, and political correctness, today’s

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Overview

Mack ‘Max’ Dunstan has played Moses, Marc Anthony, Ben-Hur, President Andrew Jackson, and Long John Silver. He has starred in The Ten Commandments, Ben-Hur, El Cid, 55 Days in Peking, Planet of the Apes, Omega Man, and Soylent Green, to name a few. Sadly, in this age of social media, reality television, and political correctness, today’s generation know him only for his hard right point of views and his outspoken nature.

Mack Dunstan’s Inferno was written as a satirical, fantasy work, where Mr. Dunstan succumbed to Alzheimer’s, went through the death process, and descended into hell, where he met victims of his pro-gun policy. Collins was a fan of Mack Dunstan. This manuscript was actually inspired when the author viewed Michael Moore, who challenged Mr. Dunstan in Bowling for Columbine. The author did not support Mr. Moore’s penchant for skewing the facts, or promoting his own agenda, but has acknowledged the filmmaker for providing the inspiration for Mack Dunstan’s Inferno.

Collins was never a fan of filmmaker Michael Moore. In fact he was utterly appalled and disgusted to hear how Mr. Moore accepted the academy award. The American Academy awards were about Gucci shoes, who was wearing what, and who's sleeping with whom. It was never about social issues. Collins never understood how a movie director could become infamous through documentary filmmaking. Only in America!

Mack Dunstan’s Inferno began with Mack Dunstan going through and experiencing the death process. As he journeyed, he met Virgil, who guided him through hell, heaven, and eventual illumination. In his journey, Mr. Dunstan met the many victims of his pro-gun policy. Many were Hispanic and African-Americans, all of whom were from the poorer classes. It was in this scenario of the underworld; Mr. Dunstan was confronted with the many sad and tragic stories, leaving him to go through the process of expurgation of guilt, anger, and elimination of the ego.

Mr. Dunstan, however, did meet a lot of celebrities in his journey of the underworld. Some were from the silent era, golden age of cinema, and classic, American TV shows. Mack Dunstan’s Inferno was not only a satire on those who enjoy distinction in the modern era, but a parity, or update, of The Divine Comedy. Within in the perimeters of fiction, Collins satirized and the so-called pillars of the communities and media darlings. He lampooned present actors, dead actors, present/past members of the political and business elite. Therefore, instead of mentioning long, dead ancient figures of history, Collins sketched in Kelsey Grammar, Sally Struthers, or JK Rowlings.

Mack Dunstan’s Inferno does not promote a dogmatic, Christian belief system, but an Eastern point of view. Find out more by reading Mack Dunstan’s Inferno, where sci fi adventure fantasy and religious superstitions will collide.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781462032761
Publisher:
iUniverse, Incorporated
Publication date:
06/27/2011
Pages:
148
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.32(d)

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Mack Dunstan's Inferno 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
TCM_Reviews More than 1 year ago
You can't take it with you. When you pass over, all your wealth and possessions are left behind. Unfortunately, what we do take with us is our regrets and our fears. Max "Mack" Dunstan, famous actor and head of the NRA, finds himself taking a tour of Hell. As he travels he meets the famous and the infamous but probably the ones that are most surprising are the average people who don't seem to deserve to be in Hell. After all, they were certainly not evil. Slowly, Mack comes to release that Heaven and Hell are merely labels. Each person merely sees him or herself, their personal reality manifested. If they are stuck in anger and hate or regret and guilt, then their afterlife will reflect that. However, if they choose to let go and rise above these self-judgements then a different world emerges. I think the journey changes Mack in a meaningful way. He starts off pretty arrogant expecting that Heaven awaits him. He's lived a good life and feels he has no vices. I don't think the man has ever really looked below the surface of himself. Complete denial.
harstan More than 1 year ago
Mack "Max" Dunstan the actor dies. He will be remembered for his starring roles in The Ten Commandments, Planet of the Apes and Ben-Hur, etc. but also for his rigid stand on gun rights as an NRA spokesman and president. He enters the spirit world where the "Supreme Court" rules him unworthy though he has problems understanding why. He meets the ancient Roman poet Virgil who will serves as his tour guide of Hades before Max's day in Judgment Court overseen by Judge Satan. Max's journey introduces him to a capitalist loan shark and other burning traveling sinners ranging from the infamous like Manson, Dahmer and the Ripper to the sex revolutionaries like Heffner and Flynt to the holier than God pseudo religious like Swaggert, Robertson and Graham. The dead actor also encounters those who died because people like him and his NRA cronies blocked gun control. This group condemns him for enabling violence as people may kill people but guns is an easily available enabler. Modernizing Dante's Divine Comedy while also mindful of Billy Joel's We Didn't Start the Fire" with Max as Heston and other twentieth century personal like General Powell and Rowlings making appearances in Paul Collins' powerful satirical lampooning of righteous American society. The journey into the inferno is filled with mockery and biting humor as Max meets the obvious infamous and a horde of the famous he never would have guessed would be inside the fires. However, it is the victims of guns who bring the poignancy to the parable as they never got to speak when alive; but the muffle of the Second Amendment advocates no longer applies (except as a condemnation) inside of Mack Dunstan's Inferno. Harriet Klausner