The Mad King [NOOK Book]

Overview

Set in the mythical European kingdom of Lutha, the protagonist is a young American named Barney Custer, of Beatrice, Nebraska, who is the son of an American farmer and a runaway Luthan princess, Victoria Rubinroth. Unaware of his royal blood, much less that he is a dead ringer for his relative Leopold, the current king of Lutha, Barney visits Lutha on the eve of the First World War to see for himself his mother's native land. As he arrives in Lutha, King Leopold, has just escaped from his ten years' imprisonment ...
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The Mad King

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Overview

Set in the mythical European kingdom of Lutha, the protagonist is a young American named Barney Custer, of Beatrice, Nebraska, who is the son of an American farmer and a runaway Luthan princess, Victoria Rubinroth. Unaware of his royal blood, much less that he is a dead ringer for his relative Leopold, the current king of Lutha, Barney visits Lutha on the eve of the First World War to see for himself his mother's native land. As he arrives in Lutha, King Leopold, has just escaped from his ten years' imprisonment at the hands of his scheming uncle, Prince Peter of Blentz. Much to his own and everyone else's confusion, Barney is naturally mistaken for the king, leading to numerous complications.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940014541954
  • Publisher: Philtre Libre
  • Publication date: 4/25/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 210 KB

Meet the Author

Author of the classic Tarzan novels, and The Mad King.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 2 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 12, 2013

    Burroughs, Edgar Rice. The Mad King [c.1926]. 188p. **1/2 Adve

    Burroughs, Edgar Rice. The Mad King [c.1926]. 188p. **1/2 Adventure through misadventure. The story is set in pre-WWI Eastern Europe, in the small kingdom of Lutha, which borders Austria and Serbia. The kingdom has been ruled for the recent ten years by a Regent. The young king, known to his countrymen as “the Mad King,” has been locked away unseen all these years, but has recently escaped. A young American enters Lutha to visit his mother’s homeland and is immediately recognized as the young king based solely upon the description in a flyer nailed to every flat surface in the kingdom – a flyer which hints that capture of the “mad king” may be alive or dead. Barney Custer of Nebraska is thrust into the intrigue surrounding the missing king, the Regent seeking to be crowned king, and the coming Austrian-Serbian war. The plot roughly follows the much earlier and oft-filmed tale, The Prisoner of Zenda [1894]. The writing style is typical of the time – no flowery prose -- the strapping, virtuous main character is developed, the others to a much lesser extent. Plots, counter-plots, sword-play, heroes, villains, a car chase [!], and the true king’s betrothed as a love-interest. Easy to read, plot always moving – appears to have originally been a magazine serial as were many of Boroughs’ works. Probably won’t make you laugh or cry, but worth a read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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