Made for Each Other: The Biology of the Human-Animal Bond [NOOK Book]

Overview


Nothing turns a baby’s head more quickly from nursing or playing than the sight of a dog or any animal. Made for Each Other lays out both sides of this deep mutual connection and the way it has evolved since prehistoric times. Drawing on the fascinating work of scientists in many fields, from neuroscience to zoology and anthropology, as well as her own investigations, Meg Daley Olmert shows the roots of this age-old bond and its great importance to our well being.
...
See more details below
Made for Each Other: The Biology of the Human-Animal Bond

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 38%)$16.99 List Price

Overview


Nothing turns a baby’s head more quickly from nursing or playing than the sight of a dog or any animal. Made for Each Other lays out both sides of this deep mutual connection and the way it has evolved since prehistoric times. Drawing on the fascinating work of scientists in many fields, from neuroscience to zoology and anthropology, as well as her own investigations, Meg Daley Olmert shows the roots of this age-old bond and its great importance to our well being.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
TV documentary producer Olmert examines an important hormonal element in the health-giving ties of affection between humans and animals. "Long before animals were practical, they were fascinating," she writes. "Long before we wanted to eat them or ride them, we wanted to paint them and touch them." It's our natural sense of biophilia-the biological urge to connect, our ancient attraction to other creatures. A raft of contemporary scientific inquiries has identified the hormone oxytocin as a prime mover in the strong feelings of attraction, recognition and commitment between mammals, and it's also an essential genetic ingredient bonding parent with child. What is oxytocin's gift? It makes us feel good by relaxing both our physiological and psychological climates; it calms and quiets as it heightens our receptivity and awareness. Olmert has a lively voice, but she's unarguably sensible as she tracks the known effects of oxytocin release. It happens when we earnestly watch an animal go about its daily routine and the living world reveals itself. Making successful physical contact increases well-being on both sides, as the animal releases oxytocin as well. Olmert explores a variety of engagements, from paralanguages (grunts, coos, growls) to the seat-bone communication between horse and rider. She only rarely takes flights into fancy, as when she speaks of the "vague, mutual sense of recognition" that flowed between man and wolf some 400,000 years ago. She also offers some intriguing digressions, such as the role oxytocin could potentially play in understanding aspects of autism and attention-deficit disorder. A warm exploration of the bond that might just keep humans sane "until our ownspecies can settle down again and act civilized."
From the Publisher

Patricia McConnell, theotherendoftheleash.com
"I’ve finished Made for Each Other, and do indeed recommend it for people who are interested in animal behavior in general, and specifically the biology behind the relationship we have with domestic animals....It's a great read."

Wayne Pacelle, President and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States
"Made for Each Other was, for me, the most stimulating book of the year."

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780786744046
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press
  • Publication date: 2/23/2010
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 312
  • Sales rank: 838,759
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author


Meg Daley Olmert, producer and writer for Emmy Award-winning series such as Smithsonian World, National Geographic Explorer, and the Discovery Channel Specials, lives on the eastern shore of Maryland.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1 Just Watching 1

2 The Birth of the Bond 15

3 A Mind on Nature 33

4 The Rules of Engagement 43

5 Brave New World 51

6 Good Dog 67

7 On the Shoulders of Giants 81

8 The Meeting of the Minds 105

9 The Dog of the Hare 121

10 New Game 137

11 Made for Each Other 151

12 The Survivors 165

13 The Kids in the Coal Mine 179

14 Oxytocin Deprivation 195

15 Just Realizing 219

Notes 245

Acknowledgments 277

Index 279

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 30, 2010

    Fascinating Look at the Biology of the Human-Animal Bond

    This is an important addition to the literature on human-animal bonds. Made for Each Other covers the current status of research about oxytocin, the attachment hormone, and the role that it plays when people and nonhuman animals interact. The science is solid. The information is interesting. And it's all explained in the most user-friendly way imaginable. Meg Olmert does a masterful job making neurobiology both interesting and easy to understand. She goes back to the earliest days when people and animals were interested in each other, and explains in a plausible manner how those early relationships most likely affected our biology. She also covers current-day studies that shed light on the nature of our special relationships with animals. I highly recommend this book for anyone interested in the human-animal bond, as well as for serious researchers on this topic.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 6, 2010

    Good book, some caveats

    A generally good book that follows some interesting paths. Caveats: A little too floridly written and over-the-top in spots, and (I think) her general conclusions are a little more pessimistic and depressing than need be.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 22, 2009

    A must read for dog lovers as it presents a different standard on how to relate to your dog

    I have been an avid reader for years, including many books on or about dogs, but had never encountered a book like this one. My dog has become very dear to me so when I saw this book it really interested me. This book looked deeply into how oxytocin is a common bond in both humans and animals, particularly domesticated animals (dogs). This provides a bond which makes it impossible for humans to deny their place in the animal world. The book has given me the ability to look at the bond which I was forming with my dog in a different way. All animal owners must be keenly aware of this bond - it is an unconditional love relationship not a master - slave relationship. In addition, as the author pointed out, it could be the chemical that provides for a more positive emotional feeling which could be possibly developed to assist in many ways - even in helping autistic children. I hope Ms. Olmert has additional works planned.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)