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Made for Goodness: And Why This Makes All the Difference [NOOK Book]

Overview

We know all too well the cruelties, hurts, and hatreds that poison life on our planet. But my daughter and I have come together to write this book because we know that the catalogue of injuries that we can and do inflict on one another is not the whole story of humanity, not by a long measure. We are indeed made for something more. We are made for goodness.
—from Made for Goodness

Over the years the same questions get asked of Desmond Tutu, the...

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Made for Goodness: And Why This Makes All the Difference

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Overview

We know all too well the cruelties, hurts, and hatreds that poison life on our planet. But my daughter and I have come together to write this book because we know that the catalogue of injuries that we can and do inflict on one another is not the whole story of humanity, not by a long measure. We are indeed made for something more. We are made for goodness.
—from Made for Goodness

Over the years the same questions get asked of Desmond Tutu, the archbishop, Nobel Peace Prize winner, and veteran of the moral movement that ended apartheid in South Africa: "How can you be so hopeful after witnessing so much evil?" "Why are you so sure goodness will triumph in the end?" This book is his answer.

Now, more than any other time in history, our world needs this message: that we are made for goodness and it is up to us to live up to our destiny.

We recognize Archbishop Tutu from the headlines as an inspirational figure who has witnessed some of the world's most sinister moments and chosen to be an ambassador of reconciliation amid political, diplomatic, and natural disasters. Now, we get a glimpse into his personal spirituality—and a better understanding of the man behind a lifetime of good works. In this intimate and personal sharing of his heart, written with his daughter, Episcopal priest Mpho Tutu, Tutu engages his reader with touching stories from his own life, as well as grisly memories from his work in the darkest corners of the world. There, amid the darkness, he calls us to hope, to joy, and to claim the goodness that we were made for. Tutu invites us to take on the disciplines of goodness, the practices that are key to finding fulfillment, meaning, and happiness for our lives.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Nobel Peace Prize–winner Desmond Tutu, who lived through South African apartheid and helped to clean up its criminal consequences by chairing the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission, could write a grocery list and people would get something out of it. With his daughter Mpho, an Episcopal priest in Washington, D.C., the retired Anglican archbishop writes a relatively personal book about his fundamental, faith-based beliefs about human nature: people are basically good because they are made in God’s image. He maintains this in the face of the horrific events he has witnessed in his country and elsewhere, and he bases his belief in part on simple experiences throughout his life that have involved family and, significantly, his failures. Tutu’s humility is striking; he is comfortable in his own skin despite being raised in a culture that officially deemed his skin color second-class. This book is not nearly as dramatic or compelling as No Future Without Forgiveness, based on his work with the Reconciliation Commission; on the other hand, it is heartening to know, or remember, that faith can be learned, reinforced, and expressed as much around the dinner table as in the public square. (Mar.)
Library Journal
Desmond Tutu, Anglican archbishop of Cape Town, as well as chairman of South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission, hardly needs an introduction. His latest book was cowritten with his daughter, an Episcopal priest as well as executive director of the Tutu Institute for Prayer and Pilgrimage. The book is founded on the broad notion that we are created with the freedom to choose good or evil but also incline fundamentally to the good. Abstract theology or spirituality has never been Archbishop Tutu's way; accordingly, this book flows effortlessly through narratives that illustrate Tutu's unquenchable hope. VERDICT A crucially important book from the Nobel Peace Prize winner; a witness to our tumultuous times.
Thich Nhat Hanh
“As the authors so clearly and beautifully say in this book, ‘anyone can choose to cultivate compassion.’ Thank you Archbishop Tutu for helping us all come back home to our true nature, which is inherently good and whole, and touch the peace that is always there for us.”
Sojourners
“By giving the audience glimpses into his prayer life and other spiritual disciplines,…Tutu offer[s] a series of poignant reflections that speak about [his] lifelong quests to choose righteousness in a world gone awry.”
The Christian Century
“Desmond Tutu and his daughter Mpho Tutu have seen more evil than most of us can begin to imagine. . . . That is why their book is shocking: How can they say that all people ‘are fundamentally good’? . . . It is a perfect book for Easter.”
NPR.org
“Archbishop Desmond Tutu is the author of Made for Goodness - written with his daughter Mpho Tutu, also a priest in the Anglican communion - … [a] reflection on faith, forgiveness and reconciliation.”
Mary Robinson
“Desmond Tutu has walked the talk all his adult life. We can all be grateful that, together with his daughter Mpho, he has now shared his secrets for why he has so much hope and joy.”
Barbara Brown Taylor
“With disarming narrative skill,...Tutu and his daughter...tell true stories in which both brutality and hopefulness turn out to be as intimate as they are global. If you are still open to being convinced that goodness changes everything, then this book is for you.”
Thomas Cahill
“I doubt there is anyone on this Earth with a deeper sense of God’s presence and goodness than Archbishop Tutu. If you are thirsty for spiritual drink, come to the water of this beautiful book.”
Sir - Richard Branson
"Even with the incredible trauma and cruelty he endured in South Africa, Archbishop Tutu still radiates love and happiness. This book is a great gift to the world and will help all of us celebrate our goodness and oneness."
Sir Richard Branson
“Even with the incredible trauma and cruelty he endured in South Africa, Archbishop Tutu still radiates love and happiness. This book is a great gift to the world and will help all of us celebrate our goodness and oneness.”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061981432
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 3/9/2010
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 637,416
  • File size: 522 KB

Meet the Author

Desmond Mpilo Tutu was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984. In 1986 he was elected archbishop of Cape Town, the highest position in the Anglican Church in South Africa. In 1994, after the end of apartheid and the election of Nelson Mandela, Tutu was appointed as chair of South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission to investigate apartheid-era crimes. His policy of forgiveness and reconciliation has become an international example of conflict resolution and a trusted method of postconflict reconstruction. He is currently the chair of The Elders, where he gives vocal defense of human rights and campaigns for the oppressed.


The Reverend Mpho A. Tutu is currently the executive director of The Desmond and Leah Tutu Legacy Foundation.

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Table of Contents

Preface ix

1 The Difference Goodness Makes 1

2 Stop "Being Good" 22

3 An Invitation to Wholeness 45

4 Free to Choose 65

5 The Habits of Wrongness 94

6 Where Is God When We Suffer? 110

7 Where Is God When We Fail 127

8 Why Does God Let Us Sin? 147

9 Going Home to Goodness 161

10 Hearing God's Voice 183

11 Seeing with God's Eyes 208

Acknowledgements 233

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 14 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 10, 2010

    Father and Daughter on goodness

    The beauty of the chapter conclusions - that's what makes this book a delight to read again and again. Sometimes chapter conclusions drive the reader into the next chapter. These endings call for calm meditation and quiet reflection. Listen to the voice of God.
    "I am breathing in your breath...
    Will you breathe in my breath? (17)
    Do you want to reach me?
    Seek and serve love. (37)
    Now and always you can make me be seen (55)
    Dear one, I have not hidden myself in heaven
    I am hidden in your heart. (79)
    I have not carved out the path that you must follow; we form the way together, you and I (96)
    When you can turn to your own suffering and know its name,
    then you will see me. (110)
    I AM. (126)
    Where have you been that I have not been? (137)
    When you have pointed out the road for home
    And pulled others onto the path
    Then you will know
    Eden is not far from you. (157)
    ... my voice
    It bubbles up in happy laughter...
    I speak as the summer breeze that caresses long grasses...
    It is I who says, "Be still a while.
    I breathe in your breath
    Yes.
    That is me. (179)
    You are made for me
    Made like me
    Made for goodness." (201)
    The conclusions are the voice of God speaking directly to the reader, in accessible language, in the joy of original blessing, to borrow a title from Matthew Fox.
    Yes, the narrative text tells some of Archbishop Tutu's stories of apartheid. Yes, the emphasis there is on the goodness of both God and humankind. Yes, the humor of the Archbishop is present. It is significant that both authors have witnessed and counseled those cruelly discriminated against, those molested and raped and yet both authors focus not on "being good" but "living into the goodness that is our essence." "Allow yourself to be the subject of that long, loving look [of God]... As we allow ourselves to accept God's acceptance, we can begin to accept our own goodness and beauty. With each glimpse of our beauty we can begin to see the goodness and beauty in others." 198
    The artistry of the cover design brings Goodness and Mpho Tutu into the spotlight while the name Desmond Tutu, so universally recognized, fades into the episcopal purple. To say the book is "written with his daughter" leads one to expect her voice to be more obvious. It will be a joy to read Mpho Tutu's own stories when she finds the time for more writing.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2010

    A very inspiring read....

    Made for Goodness gave a lot of new information for me on South Africa but more importantly promoted a lot of positive thoughts on how to live a better life. I am often too hard myself as a person and this book made me realize that God loves us no matter what. Desmond Tutu and his daughter wrote a wonderful book that is worth reading.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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