Made in America: Immigrant Students in Our Public Schools

Made in America: Immigrant Students in Our Public Schools

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by Laurie Olsen, Herbert R. Kohl
     
 

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Made in America is a riveting, firsthand portrait of life at Madison High, a prototypical public high school. Laurie Olsen spent two-and-a-half years in the Madison High community attending classes and interviewing teachers, administrators, students, and parents. Through their stories, we discover the contemporary version of the Americanization of immigrants -- a

Overview

Made in America is a riveting, firsthand portrait of life at Madison High, a prototypical public high school. Laurie Olsen spent two-and-a-half years in the Madison High community attending classes and interviewing teachers, administrators, students, and parents. Through their stories, we discover the contemporary version of the Americanization of immigrants -- a complex process that ultimately requires them to give up their national identities and mother tongues to be accepted in an academic and social world that then, ironically, denies them full participation. Olsen portrays immigrant students as they are "made in America" and begin to see that to become American is to take their place on the "racial map" of our nation.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Olsen, director of California Tomorrow, spent two years observing life at Madison High School<-->a prototypical American high school with 20 percent of its student body born abroad. Her interviews with students, administrators, and parents describe the challenge they face and create a disturbing portrait of racial separation. Olsen concludes that the Americanization of immigrants marginalizes immigrant students, requiring them to give up their national identities and mother tongues to be accepted in a world that then denies them full participation. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781565844001
Publisher:
New Press, The
Publication date:
10/28/1997
Pages:
276
Product dimensions:
6.44(w) x 9.55(h) x 1.07(d)

What People are saying about this

Jonathan Kozol
[A] strong, sensitive, and valuable book about the many subtle ethnic lines that wall off immigrant youngsters in our public schools—and, on a deeper level, the continuing existence of what Laurie Olsen rightly calls 'the dirty business of exclusion.'
—(Jonathan Kozol, author of Amazing Grace)
William Ayers
Laurie Olsen has lived her life breaking down the walls of ignorance and borders of fear, fighting for immigrant rights, tolerance, understanding, and unity. Made in America is an important book. More than a portrait of a school, this is a portrait of America.
—(William Ayers, author of City Kids, City Teachers and A Kind and Just Parent)
Jim Cummins
Made in America offers a powerful learning experience�.Beautifully written and profound in its implications. I would make it required reading for every teacher.
—(Jim Cummins, coauthor of Brave New School: Challenging Cultural Illiteracy Trough Global Learning Networks)
Ronald Takaki
Out of the 'culture wars' comes Laurie Olsen's grounded study. Wonderfully avoiding the polemics and the dense theorizing that have dominated this debate�Olsen skillfully offers us an opportunity to remake America into a multicultural and more democratic society.
—(Ronald Takaki, author of A Different Mirror: A History of Multicultural America)

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Made in America: Immigrant Students in Our Public Schools 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I found this novel to be eye opening in to the struggles that immigrant students endure everyday. Being a white, native-born American girl, I never thought twice about the equality in the schooling system growing up, because I always felt comfortable in my classrooms and I assumed that everyone else did as well. I feel as though no student, regardless of race, religion or culture should every show up to school in fear of being mocked for their lack of English proficiency or their clothing. I also feel as though schools as well as communities need to work harder to embrace diversity and make every culture feel welcomed. It’s our differences that help us grow as a nation and the great thing about America is the freedom and diversity that make up each and every community. If we could realize how beneficial a diverse group of students could be and the insight and perspectives they could offer in the classroom, I think everyone will grow.