Madhur Jaffrey's World Vegetarian: More Than 650 Meatless Recipes from Around the World

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Overview

In her most comprehensive volume yet, Madhur Jaffrey draws on more than four decades of culinary adventures, travels, and experimentation for a diverse collection that both intrigues and delights the palate. Dishes from five continents touch on virtually all the world's best loved flavors, for a unsurpassed selection of vegetarian fare.
        
More than 650 recipes exemplify Madhur's unsurpassed ability...
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Overview

In her most comprehensive volume yet, Madhur Jaffrey draws on more than four decades of culinary adventures, travels, and experimentation for a diverse collection that both intrigues and delights the palate. Dishes from five continents touch on virtually all the world's best loved flavors, for a unsurpassed selection of vegetarian fare.
        
More than 650 recipes exemplify Madhur's unsurpassed ability to create simple, flavorful homecooking that is well within the reach of every cook. Extensive sections on Beans, Vegetables, Grains, and Dairy explore the myriad ways these staples are enjoyed worldwide. Each section opens with a detailed introduction; Madhur describes methods for preparation and storage, as well as different cooking techniques and their cultural origins. Throughout she balances appealing, uncomplicated dishes such as sumptuous omelets and rich polentas with less familiar ingredients such as green mangoes, pigeon peas, and spelt. Madhur demystifies the latter with clear-cut explanations so that incorporating new combinations and interesting flavors into everyday cooking becomes second nature. She also offers substantial sections on Soups, Salads, and Drinks, as well as Sauces and Other Flavorings, to help round out a meatless meal and add exciting new flavors to even the most easily prepared dishes. Finally, a complete glossary of ingredients and techniques clarifies some of the little-known elements of the world's cuisines so that even the uninitiated can bring the flavors of Asia, the Middle East, the Caribbean, and more to their tables.
        
Throughout this extensive collection, Madhur includes personal anecdotes and historical contexts that bring her recipes to life, whether she's remembering field of leeks she saw in the mountains of northern Greece or describing how corn-based dishes arrived in Indonesia through colonial trade. Committed vegetarians will rejoice at the wide variety of meatless fare she offers, and nonvegetarians will enjoy experimenting with Madhur's global flavorings. This highly readable resource promises to be a valuable addition to any cook's library, helping everyone make healthful ethnic foods a part of everyday cooking.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
We really have to thank the woman from Springfield, Illinois, who once asked Madhur Jaffrey, "What do vegetarians eat? Lots of boiled broccoli, I suppose?" With 650 mouthwatering recipes from around the globe, this award-winning book is Jaffrey's global answer to that question.

Madhur Jaffrey's World Vegetarian is for the sometime vegetarian, the full-time vegetarian, and the cook who wants to expand his or her vegetable repertoire. Armed with this vast collection of international recipes, even the most uncreative cook will be able to fix imaginative vegetable dishes.

The book's contents seem almost like a beauty pageant, with contenders from every nation: Chickpea and Potato Curry, Caribbean Style from Trinidad; Yogurt with Spinach and Cloves from India; Bulgur Risotto with Pumpkin from Cyprus; Risotto with Dried Porcini Mushrooms from Italy; Mung Bean Thread Salad from China. All the recipes seem well seasoned; most are simple, and hard-to-find ingredients come with substitutions.

As Jaffrey points out, some ingredients, like eggplant, are used in many different cultures: If it is cooked with mustard and fennel seeds, it must be Bengali; if it is cooked with honey, Moroccan; if creamed with olive oil and lemon, Middle Eastern or Greek/Turkish. But ingredients like chickpea flour are less widely used -- Jaffrey offers chickpea fries from southern France, pizza from southern France and the Genoa region of Italy, and pancakes and stews from India.

While most of the recipes are for main or side dishes, condiments, spice mixes, drinks, and sauces get attention, too. A comprehensive glossary and resource page round out the book. (Ginger Curwen)

From the Publisher
"This book is a priceless treasury of eclectic, fascinating, and beautifully written recipes that are unified by Madhur Jaffrey's own seductive esthetic, which is born out of her immersion in the traditions of Indian cooking and her respect and passion for the garden and the farmer's market."
-- Alice Waters

"Colors, flavors, and textures are so artfully combined in these enticing vegetable dishes, one would never have a sense of deprivation for having forsaken meat. With such a seductive diversity, it is a blessing that the recipes are explicit, and most are simple to do."
-- Mimi Sheraton

"In World Vegetarian, Madhur Jaffrey proves as exciting a travel guide as she is a cook! Her gastronomic tour around the globe is accented with useful cooking tips and lively anecdotes, while the varied and well-written recipes are a mouthwatering tour-de-force. From Azuki beans to Zahtar spice, from the Old World to the New, the scope and depth of this book are breathtaking."
-- Michael Romano

"Madhur Jaffrey's World Vegetarian is Exhibit A in showing us just how large that world is today and simultaneously how small the globe, as we connect to cultures and cuisines on a worldwide web of flavors and ingredients. While East Indians are eating Spicy Corn with Sesame Seeds and Tomatoes, Americans are eating Green Peas with Coconut and Cilantro. Jaffrey's clarity is as perfected in small details as in large and everywhere her taste unifies dishes from lands far and near. Buy one for your kitchen shelf and one for your carry-on luggage."
-- Betty Fussell

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780609809235
  • Publisher: Crown Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/15/2002
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 768
  • Sales rank: 261,073
  • Product dimensions: 7.95 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.71 (d)

Meet the Author

Madhur Jaffrey is the author of seven previous cookbooks, including the classic Invitation to Indian Cooking and Madhur Jaffrey's Taste of the Far East, which was voted Best International Cookbook and Book of the Year for 1993 by the James Beard Foundation. She is also an award winning actress with numerous major motion pictures to her credit. She lives in New York City.
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Read an Excerpt

Madhur Jaffrey's World Vegetarian


By Madhur Jaffrey

Clarkson N Potter Publishers

Copyright © 2002 Madhur Jaffrey
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780609809235

Spanish Potato, Chard, and Bean Soup
Spain
Caldo Gallego

Use any medium-small white beans here. This is a pale soup with flecks of dark green. It is served with a little dribble of fruity olive oil. A good crusty bread on the side makes it into a perfect lunch or first course.
This soup may be made in advance and reheated.

1 cup (6 ounces) dried white beans, such as cannellini or navy
5 cups vegetable stock
1 garlic clove, peeled
2 teaspoons chopped fresh oregano or ½ teaspoon dried
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 smallish onions (7 ounces), peeled and cut into ¼-inch dice
1 medium baking potato (8 ounces), peeled and cut into ¼-inch dice
4 lightly packed cups (8 ounces) chopped chard (both stems and leaves)
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh parsley
Salt as needed
Extra-virgin olive oil, about 1 teaspoon per serving

Soak the beans overnight as suggested on page 6, or use the Quick-Soak Method on page 6. Drain, discarding any soaking liquid.

In a medium pot, bring the beans and stock to a boil, skimming off the froth that rises to the top. Add the garlic and oregano. Stir and turn the heat down to low. Cover partially and simmer gently for 40 to 60 minutes, or until the beans are tender. (Olderbeans will take longer to cook.) Crush the garlic clove against the side of the pot and mix well.

Put the oil in a large pan and set over medium-high heat. When hot, add the onions and potato. Stir and cook for 4 to 5 minutes so there is a little bit of browning. Add the chard and parsley. Stir for about 1 1/2 minutes, or until the chard has wilted. Now add the cooked beans and their liquid and bring to a boil. Cover partially, turn the heat down to low, and simmer gently for 30 minutes, stirring now and then. Mash some of the beans and the potato pieces against the sides of the pan. Taste for salt; you will probably need to add some even if your stock was salted. Mix well.

Ladle into soup plates and dribble a teaspoon of extra-virgin olive oil over each serving.
serves 6
----------------------------------------------------------------
Eggplant with Minty Tomato Sauce and Yogurt
Afghanistan
Badenjan Boorani

This is a superb party dish from Afghanistan -- rounds of eggplant freshly fried, and topped first with a tomato sauce and then with a dollop of creamy yogurt. Serve rice on the side. You may also serve a single round of eggplant as a first course.

If you wish to use fresh tomatoes, you will need 1½cups of peeled and chopped tomatoes.

The frying of the eggplant slices should be done at the last minute. It takes 6 to 7 minutes for one batch. You might need to do two batches. Allow yourself another couple of minutes to let the oil heat.

1¼ pounds eggplant (the large variety)
1¼ teaspoons salt
For the tomato sauce
¼ cup peanut or canola oil
1 medium onion, very finely chopped
3 garlic cloves, peeled and very finely chopped
8 plum tomatoes from a can, finely chopped, plus ¼ cup of the can liquid
1¼ teaspoons salt
3 tablespoons chopped fresh mint leaves
1 teaspoon ground cumin
½teaspoon ground coriander
¼ teaspoon cayenne
Freshly ground black pepper
You also need
½cup plain yogurt
Peanut or canola oil for deep-frying
Extra mint sprigs or leaves for garnishing


Trim the very ends of the eggplant and cut it crosswise into 1-inch-thick slices. Put the slices in a single layer in a large platter or lasagna-type dish. Sprinkle the salt over both sides, rubbing it in well. Set aside for 1 hour.

Meanwhile, make the tomato sauce. Put the oil in a large, nonstick frying pan and set over medium-high heat. When hot, put in the onion. Stir and fry for 2 to 3 minutes, or until the onion pieces begin to brown at the edges. Put in the garlic. Stir for a few seconds. Now put in the tomatoes and their liquid as well as all the remaining ingredients for the tomato sauce. Stir to mix. Cover, turn the heat to low, and cook gently for 10 minutes. Set aside in a warm place.

Make the yogurt sauce. Put the yogurt in a small bowl and beat lightly with a fork.

Just before you sit down to eat, put oil to a depth of 2 to 3 inches for deep-frying in a wok or deep-fryer and set over medium heat. Take the eggplant slices from the platter and dry them off well with paper towels.

When the oil is hot, drop in as many slices as the utensil will hold easily and fry, turning now and then, for 6 to 7 minutes, or until both sides are a medium brown color. Drain well on paper towels. Do a second batch, if needed.

To serve, arrange the eggplant slices in a single layer on a large platter. Top each slice with a dollop of the tomato sauce and then with a tablespoon of the yogurt. Garnish with the mint sprigs or leaves. Serve immediately.

serves 3 to 4



Continues...

Excerpted from Madhur Jaffrey's World Vegetarian by Madhur Jaffrey Copyright © 2002 by Madhur Jaffrey. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Introduction viii
Dried Beans, Dried Peas, Lentils, and Nuts 2
Vegetables 124
Grains 324
Dairy 510
Soups, Salads, and Drinks 574
Sauces and Added Flavorings 656
Equipment, Glossary, and Resources 709
Index 741
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Recipe

ELENA AVEROFF’S SPINACH WITH RICE -- Spanakorizo
Serves 4

I was served this at my first meal in Metsovo and just fell in love with it. Going to Metsovo, a quaint little town nestling in the hills of the Epirus region was for me like going to one of the Indian hill stations. While Athens had been hot, here, walking in the narrow cobbled streets or sitting in the Averoffs' traditional wooden house, it was deliciously cool. Spanakorizo is made all over Greece and Cyprus and there are many variations. This is Mrs. Averoff's version. She makes it with spinach and scallions that she picks from her own kitchen garden. While many people chop up the spinach, Mrs. Averoff keeps her leaves whole. I also found it very interesting to watch Mrs. Averoff snipping the fresh dill into the spanakorizo with a pair of scissors!

For those who have never eaten this, let me explain that it contains more spinach than rice. The rice acts almost like a sauce, helping to "unify" the spinach. I like the dish best when it is served hot, but I have had it warm and at room temperature as well. I have seen it served with a dollop of thick Greek yogurt on top or with a generous squeeze of lemon juice. All versions are good.

For a simple Greek meal, you could serve this dish with some kalamata olives, some goat or sheep's milk cheese (the cheese can be drizzled with olive oil and sprinkled with fresh or dried oregano or thyme), a bean dish, and some crusty bread.

1-1/2 pounds fresh spinach
6 scallions, cut crosswise into fine rings all the way up to the green section
5 tablespoons olive oil
Salt
3 tablespoons Italian risotto rice or any medium-grain rice
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh dill
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice (or more, if desired)

Trim the spinach and separate the leaves. Wash well and drain. Bring 12 cups of water to a rolling boil and drop in the spinach leaves. Cook for 1 to 2 minutes, or until they are just wilted. Drain. Run under cold water and drain in a colander.

Put 2 cups of water in a wide pot and bring to a boil. Put in the scallions, oil, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and the rice. Cook on medium-high heat, stirring now and then, for 10 to 12 minutes, or until the rice is just done and the liquid in the pot is reduced to a little thick sauce. Put in the spinach and another 1/2 teaspoon salt. Stir and cook for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the dill and lemon juice and stir to mix. Serve hot.

MELLE DERKO SAMIRA’S MOROCCAN CASSEROLE OF VEGETABLES -- Tagine of Vegetables
Serves 6

A tagine is a round, casserole-type dish made of clay. As it sits on the top of the stove, its conical clay lid causes steam to rise and then fall gently down the sloping sides as condensation, allowing for cooking with a minimum of water. Instead, I use a casserole with an 8-cup capacity, which is roughly 8 x 8 x 2-1/2 inches and has a lid. I place it in the oven for slow baking.

This gentle vegetable medley may be served with couscous, rice, or bread. A bean dish should be served on the side to complete the meal.

2 medium zucchini (13 ounces), cut into 1/8-inch-thick rounds
4 medium carrots (8 ounces), peeled and cut into 1/8-inch-thick rounds
1-1/2 teaspoons peeled and very finely chopped garlic
1-1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
1-1/2 teaspoons paprika
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh cilantro leaves
4 tablespoons finely chopped fresh parsley
1-1/2 teaspoons salt
Freshly ground black pepper
2 waxy red potatoes (10 ounces), peeled and cut into 1/8-inch-thick rounds
1/2 head green cabbage (10 ounces), shredded (6 cups in volume)
1 large onion (6 ounces), cut into 1/8-inch-thick rounds
2 large tomatoes (15 ounces), cut into 1/4-inch-thick rounds
1 medium green bell pepper (6 ounces), seeded and cut into 1/4-inch-thick rounds
1/4 cup olive oil

Set an oven rack in the middle of the oven. Preheat the oven to 350° F.

To assemble the casserole, arrange the zucchini in a single, slightly overlapping layer at the bottom of an ovenproof dish (see recipe introduction). Over this, arrange the carrots, also in an overlapping layer. Now sprinkle 1/4 teaspoon garlic, 1/4 teaspoon cumin, 1/4 teaspoon paprika, 1 teaspoon cilantro, 2 teaspoons parsley, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste.

Arrange the potatoes in a single overlapping layer on top of the carrots. Again sprinkle 1/4 teaspoon garlic, 1/4 teaspoon cumin, 1/4 teaspoon paprika, 1 teaspoon cilantro, 2 teaspoons parsley, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste.

Spread the cabbage on top of the potatoes and over it sprinkle ¼ teaspoon garlic, 1/4 teaspoon cumin, 1/4 teaspoon paprika, 1 teaspoon cilantro, 2 teaspoons parsley, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste.

Carefully arrange the onion rounds in a single overlapping layer over the cabbage. Some of the onion rings may come apart, but try to maintain their shape as best you can. Sprinkle 1/4 teaspoon garlic, 1/4 teaspoon cumin, 1/4 teaspoon paprika, 1 teaspoon cilantro, 2 teaspoons parsley, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste.

Arrange the tomatoes in a single overlapping layer over the onion slices. Sprinkle 1/4 teaspoon garlic, 1/4 teaspoon cumin, 1/4 teaspoon paprika, 1 teaspoon cilantro, 2 teaspoons parsley, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste.

Finally, arrange the green peppers in an overlapping layer over the very top. Sprinkle 1/4 teaspoon garlic, 1/4 teaspoon cumin, 1/4 teaspoon paprika, 1 teaspoon cilantro, 2 teaspoons parsley, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste.

Cover and bake for 50 to 60 minutes. During the last 20 minutes, baste frequently with the juices that accumulate at the bottom. A bulb baster is ideal for this. If you don't have one, you may carefully tilt the dish, spoon up the juices, and pour them over the top. Cover the dish and put it back into the oven each time. Baste 3 to 4 times during the last 20 minutes. Serve hot.

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Customer Reviews

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2011

    It's like I've never tasted some of these vegetables before now.

    I can't believe how incredibly delicious these recipes are. I've tried out two dozen or so recipes and without exception they are fantastic. I find myself wanting to go back and repeat a recent dish, but I know if I do then I'll be missing an opportunity to try out another new, exciting, amazing recipe.

    To anyone who ever eats vegetables of any sort, even the most card-carrying-carnivore out there, this recipe book is a must-have.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2012

    Highly Recommended - I love this book

    The recipes in this book are wonderful - it is one of the best vegetarian cookbooks I have purchase. The recipes I have made to date are very tasty and not too earthy - so they are enjoyed by nonvegetarians (AKA my meat loving hubby and my somewhat picky kids). I also like the fact that the recipes come from all over the world included places that often do not get much attention in cook books. I am planning to buy this for my Vegetarian friends for Bday/Christmas.

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