Mafia: The Government's Secret File on Organized Crime

Mafia: The Government's Secret File on Organized Crime

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by United States Treasury Department
     
 

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Some time in the early 1960s, during the golden age of organized crime in America—the era that would inspire The Godfather; Goodfellas, and even The Sopranos—federal investigators pulled every known piece of information on more than 800 Mafia members worldwide into a thick, phone-book-sized directory. From old-school gangsters

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Overview

Some time in the early 1960s, during the golden age of organized crime in America—the era that would inspire The Godfather; Goodfellas, and even The Sopranos—federal investigators pulled every known piece of information on more than 800 Mafia members worldwide into a thick, phone-book-sized directory. From old-school gangsters like Lucky Luciano and Mickey Cohen to young turks like Paul Castellano and Vinny "The Chin" Gigante, the guide offered at-a-glance profiles of small-time thugs and major dons alike... and was allegedly the book Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy used to investigate the mob.

Recently discovered, and published for the first time in this facsimile edition, Mafia is a treasure trove of info on the underworld in mid-century America—a revelatory artifact and an irresistible read.

Editorial Reviews

Rich Cohen
“Fascinating . . . . A panoramic view of the American underworld—the national face seen in a fun house mirror.”
Nicholas Pileggi
“A treasure trove for true crime buffs and mob aficionados—the mug shots alone are worth the price of admission.”
T.J. English
“Make room on your true-crime bookshelf for this veritable high school yearbook of America’s criminal class.”
Legs McNeil
“Mafia is the Bible for Mafia-watchers and amateur detectives everywhere.”
Salon.com
“For mobheads and true crime fanatics, [Mafia] is the equivalent of a hijacked truck of unmarked bills. It’s also a quirky little slice of the American dream.”
Library Journal

Even though Herbert Hoover's FBI usually gets the credit for chasing the Mafia, it was the Treasury Department's Narcotics Bureau that spent the 1960s quietly collecting information on known members of the Cosa Nostra. Only 50 copies of the resulting dossier were ever printed; the little-known government document provided Robert F. Kennedy with valuable ammunition in his war on the Mafia once he became attorney general. Now the dossier is being published, and it is a gold mine for organized crime buffs and crime writers. More than 800 criminals are profiled in a plain, "just the facts" manner, one to a page. In short, this is a facsimile of the original compilation. Each profile includes name, nicknames, haunts, criminal associates, criminal history, and "modus operandi." Most include a mug shot. Among the dry facts are fascinating tidbits on an array of characters: e.g., two cousins with identical names, identified as "One Eye" and "Two Eye" for obvious reasons; a mobster whose criminal files disappeared from the Chicago Police Department; and a family that retired from the Mafia to go into the cheese business. This excellent resource belongs in both public and academic libraries.
—Deirdre Bray Root

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061363856
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
10/30/2007
Pages:
944
Sales rank:
495,689
Product dimensions:
8.20(w) x 8.20(h) x 2.00(d)

What People are saying about this

Nicholas Pileggi
“A treasure trove for true crime buffs and mob aficionados—the mug shots alone are worth the price of admission.”
T.J. English
“Make room on your true-crime bookshelf for this veritable high school yearbook of America’s criminal class.”
Legs McNeil
“Mafia is the Bible for Mafia-watchers and amateur detectives everywhere.”
Rich Cohen
“Fascinating . . . . A panoramic view of the American underworld—the national face seen in a fun house mirror.”

Meet the Author

Cheeta the Chimp was just a baby when he was snatched from the Liberian jungle in 1932 by the great animal importer Henry Trefflich. In 1934 Cheeta appeared in his first of many Tarzan movies, Tarzan and His Mate. Cheeta finally retired from the big screen after the 1967 film Doctor Dolittle. The oldest living chimpanzee ever recorded, Cheeta, now seventy-six, is retired in Palm Springs, where he has reinvented himself as a globally acclaimed abstract painter.

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