Magdalene's Lost Legacy: Symbolic Numbers and the Sacred Union in Christianity

Overview

In Magdalene’s Lost Legacy, author Margaret Starbird decodes the symbolic numbers embedded in the original Greek phrases of the New Testament—revealing the powerful presence of the feminine divine.

The New Testament contains wide use of gematria, a  literary device that allows the sums of certain phrases to produce sacred numbers. Exploring the hidden meanings behind these numbers, Starbird reveals that the union between Jesus and his bride, Mary Magdalene, formed a sacred ...

See more details below
Paperback (Original)
$13.08
BN.com price
(Save 12%)$15.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (53) from $1.99   
  • New (8) from $6.95   
  • Used (45) from $1.99   
Magdalene's Lost Legacy: Symbolic Numbers and the Sacred Union in Christianity

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price
(Save 33%)$15.00 List Price

Overview

In Magdalene’s Lost Legacy, author Margaret Starbird decodes the symbolic numbers embedded in the original Greek phrases of the New Testament—revealing the powerful presence of the feminine divine.

The New Testament contains wide use of gematria, a  literary device that allows the sums of certain phrases to produce sacred numbers. Exploring the hidden meanings behind these numbers, Starbird reveals that the union between Jesus and his bride, Mary Magdalene, formed a sacred partnership that was the cornerstone of the earliest Christian community.

Magdalene’s Lost Legacy demonstrates how the crucial teaching of the sacred marriage that unites masculine and feminine principles—the heiros gamos—is the partnership model for life on our planet and the ultimate blueprint for civilization. Starbird’s research challenges the concept that Christ was celibate and establishes Mary Magdalene as the human incarnation of the sacred bride. The author also explains the true meaning of the “666” prophesied in the Book of Revelation. Through this potent reclaiming of the lost legacy of Mary Magdalene, Margaret Starbird offers the opportunity to restore the divine feminine to her rightful role as bride, beloved, and sacred partner. 

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Margaret Starbird fearlessly explores the symbols and the hidden clues within the scriptures of the sacred union. . . . Starbird writes eloguently and convincingly, laying the facts before us and allowing us to come to our own conclusions about these wonderful and secret teachings."

"Margaret Starbird's work is of particular interest to me because it fuses the diverse fields of symbolism, mythology, art, heraldry, psychology, and gospel history. Her research opens doors for each of us to further explore the rich iconography of our own spiritual history."

"Recommended for academic libraries serving women's studies programs and for public libraries where patrons are interested in Christian women throughout the ages."

"Through her decoding, Starbird reveals the powerful presence of the feminine divinity in religion where it has been almost erased."

Sept/Oct/Nov 2003 Network for Women's Spirituality
"Through her decoding, Starbird reveals the powerful presence of the feminine divinity in religion where it has been almost erased."
author of The Da Vinci Code Dan Brown
"Margaret Starbird's work is of particular interest to me because it fuses the diverse fields of symbolism, mythology, art, heraldry, psychology, and gospel history. Her research opens doors for each of us to further explore the rich iconography of our own spiritual history."
Gary P. Gillum
"Recommended for academic libraries serving women's studies programs and for public libraries where patrons are interested in Christian women throughout the ages."
Network for Women's Spirituality
"Through her decoding, Starbird reveals the powerful presence of the feminine divinity in religion where it has been almost erased."
Dan Brown
"Margaret Starbird's work is of particular interest to me because it fuses the diverse fields of symbolism, mythology, art, heraldry, psychology, and gospel history. Her research opens doors for each of us to further explore the rich iconography of our own spiritual history."
Lesley Crossingham
"Margaret Starbird fearlessly explores the symbols and the hidden clues within the scriptures of the sacred union. . . . Starbird writes eloguently and convincingly, laying the facts before us and allowing us to come to our own conclusions about these wonderful and secret teachings."
Library Journal
These two books have the same purpose: "to recover the experience of women throughout the centuries who have been among the most ardent and devoted disciples of Jesus." But Starbird (The Goddess in the Gospels: Reclaiming the Sacred Feminine) directs her texts to two separate audiences, using two separate publishers, with surprisingly little overlap. The Feminine Face of Christianity is a practical guidebook for Christian women that considers women's role in Christianity and the challenges women face today. Woven throughout this beautifully illustrated book are prayers, meditations, quotes from saints, and exercises that reflect many feminine elements: compassion, reconciliation, radical inclusiveness and equality, and the healing of crippled bodies and broken hearts. Short biographies of the Virgin Mary, Joan of Arc, Mother Teresa, and others strengthen the meditative nature of the text. Starbird does not negate the importance of men in Christianity but places them on the same level as women, even as she advocates the ordination of women and the use of married priests in Catholicism. Her discussion of the Cathars and their relationship with St. Francis of Assisi is the most interesting part of this book. Magdalene's Lost Legacy, on the other hand, reveals the symbolic numerology (gematria) of the New Testament, attempting to prove that the Sacred Union (hieros gamos) of Jesus and his bride (Mary Magdalene) was the cornerstone of the earliest Christian community. The author explains the "true" meaning of the "666" prophesied in the Book of Revelation and shows how the worship of a celibate Christ created a hierarchical priesthood now embroiled in scandal. This esoteric little study will be more to the liking of readers who are interested in symbolic, gnostic, and unorthodox glimpses into Christian history, as evidenced by this passage: "When the patriarchs of early Christianity supplanted the model of sacred marriage that was at the heart of the infant Church and denied Mary Magdalene as the consort of their sacrificed bridegroom/king, they could not have foreseen the tragic consequences of the broken mandala." Both books are recommended for academic libraries serving women's studies programs and for public libraries where patrons are interested in Christian women throughout the ages.-Gary P. Gillum, Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781591430124
  • Publisher: Inner Traditions/Bear & Company
  • Publication date: 6/30/2003
  • Edition description: Original
  • Pages: 176
  • Sales rank: 746,328
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Margaret Starbird holds a master's degree from the University of Maryland and has studied at the Christian Albrechts Universität in Kiel, Germany, and at Vanderbilt Divinity School. She is the author of The Woman with the Alabaster Jar: Mary Magdalen and the Holy Grail and The Goddess in the Gospels. She lives with her family in the Puget Sound area of Washington State.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

THE FIRST ELEMENTS OF GEOMETRY

Tons Brunés has offered an interesting explanation that relates to the heavenly properties of seven and to its associations with the Goddess and the moon, showing how the menstrual feminine (lunar) cycle of twenty-eight days related to the basic human digits. According to his analysis, the first numbers used by human beings were the numbers one to twenty, corresponding to fingers and toes. Units of measurement were in all likelihood as simple as a man’s foot, his stride, and his thumb joint. A fathom, the length between his fingertips with his arms outstretched, was six feet. Because the size of a typical man’s foot does not vary widely from one culture to another, the basic measurements of the ancient civilizations Egypt, Greece, and Rome were very similar. For example, a Greek foot measures 1.008 of an English foot. The basic assumptions concerning the origins of measurement hypothesized by Tons Brunés are confirmed by archaeological evidence.

Brunés postulates that the first symbol used by our ancestors was most probably the circle, the “sun” symbol ubiquitous across the globe. He suggests that the radius of the circle measured 5, the number of digits on a human hand. As shown in figure 2.2, when a circle having a diameter of 10 units is divided into quarters by a cross through the center, each arm of the cross measures 5 units, and the chord drawn between two of the arms (the hypotenuse of each of the four right triangles formed) measures only slightly more than 7 units (approximating the square root of 50).

This original division of the circle into quarters reflected the actual phases of the moon in its seven-day intervals, and the lunar month of twenty-eight days that governs the menstrual flow of women can similarly be divided into four equal segments of seven days each. Thus, the association of the number seven with the sacred feminine and the lunar aspects of “virgin” and the moon goddess is reinforced. Brunés suggests that this elementary mathematical discovery was probably the foundation of all later inventions and may lie at the root of the cyclical symbolism of the number seven among ancient peoples who adopted a week of seven days reflected in the Book of Genesis: “So God blessed the seventh day and made it holy” (Gen. 2:3).

To the naked eye of our remote ancestors, only seven luminous bodies were visible in the heavens—the sun and moon and five planets. Pythagoras named seven tones on the musical scale, and later seven liberal arts were identified. Seven wonders of the world were praised, seven chakras proclaimed, and seven demons typically expelled.

In Hebrew law and scriptures, seven was the sacred number of completeness of a time cycle. The people of the covenant worshiped Yahweh, their unseen deity, on the Sabbath, the seventh day, which was marked as a day of rest. By analogy, it took Solomon seven years to complete the Temple in Jerusalem. Many Jewish festivals were celebrated for a period of seven days, and seven weeks occurred between the feast of the unleavened bread (Passover) and the feast of the leavened bread (Pentecost). This latter feast was begun on the fiftieth day, the “jubilee day” after the elapse of “a week of weeks” (7 x 7 days = 49 days plus one added day—the fiftieth day celebrated as the “jubilee”).

In the Book of Leviticus we find a command of Yahweh to Moses concerning the land: “When you enter the land that I am giving to you, let the land, too, keep a Sabbath for the Lord. For six years you may sow your field and for six years prune your vineyard . . . but during the seventh year the land shall have a complete rest” (Lev. 2-4). In Israel a field was cultivated for six years and allowed by law to lie fallow during the seventh—which was called the “sabbatical year.” A cycle of seven “sabbatical” years—a total cycle of forty-nine years—was followed in Israel by a fiftieth year when no work was done, no fields planted. It was to be a “jubilee” year of thanksgiving and merrymaking to honor the gracious bounty of God. In this fiftieth year, all slaves were to be set free, all debts forgiven, all grudges forgotten, and the slate rubbed clean so that in the fifty-first year a whole new cycle could commence: “This fiftieth year you shall make sacred by proclaiming liberty in the land of all its inhabitants . . . you shall not sow nor shall you reap the aftergrowth” (Lev. 25:10-11).

Some of these uses of the number seven are familiar—the feasts of Easter and Pentecost in the Christian calendar are derived from the great harvest feasts of the leavened and unleavened bread from the Jewish calendar, hence the fifty days separating the two holy days. In medieval times, an apprentice served his artisan master for seven years and then continued to serve as a journeyman for another seven before himself becoming a master. Other familiar uses of seven-year periods are found in the term of servitude of indentured servants and the “sabbatical” leave of professors, a period allowing them to “lie fallow.” Even today children “come of age” at twenty-one after three complete cycles of seven years.

Seven saw a time cycle completed, but it was also the number of eternity and of spiritual completeness or perfection. In Greek tradition it was the virgin number associated with Pallas Athene and Holy Wisdom, while in Christian tradition it is the number often associated with the Holy Spirit, whose gifts are sevenfold. There are seven spiritual works of mercy and seven cardinal sins. Jesus said we should forgive not seven times, but seventy times seven!

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction: In Search of the Lost Bride

1 The Blueprint of the Cosmic Temple

2 The Canon of Number

3 Sacred Numbers and the New Testament

4 Architects of the Christian Faith

5 The Spirit and the Law

6 The Apocalypse Agenda

7 Gematria in the Apocalypse of John

8 The Turning of the Age

9 The Holy Name of Mary

Epilogue: Eros Denied

Notes

Glossary

Chronology

Bibliography

Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)