The Magic Kingdom

The Magic Kingdom

1.6 3
by Stanley Elkin, Rick Moody
     
 

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-- Brimming with Elkin's comic brilliance and singular wordplay, The Magic Kingdom tells the story of Eddy Bale, who, determined to learn from the ghastly experience of his son's long, drawn-out death, decides to raise enough money to take seven terminally ill children to Disney World in order to give them a dream vacation before they die.
-- Stanley Elkin, a

Overview

-- Brimming with Elkin's comic brilliance and singular wordplay, The Magic Kingdom tells the story of Eddy Bale, who, determined to learn from the ghastly experience of his son's long, drawn-out death, decides to raise enough money to take seven terminally ill children to Disney World in order to give them a dream vacation before they die.
-- Stanley Elkin, a two-timer winner of the National Book Critics Award and three-time nominee for the National Book Award, is widely considered to be one of the most important writers of the contemporary period. Author of over a dozen novels and short story collections, his works include The Franchiser, George Mills, and Mrs. Ted Bliss.
-- First published by Dutton (1985), most recent paperback by Thunder's Mouth (1991).

Editorial Reviews

Max Apple
Mr. Elkin's language is always a surprise and a joy. Mr. Elkin tortures language the way fate usually tortures his characters, but Mr. Elkin is kinder than fate and more fruitful. He squeezes out new meanings....Even fiction, that familiar opener of eyes, rarely opens our eyes to the interior terrors. We are accustomed to metaphors of disease and decay. Mr. Elkin presents the real thing; not metaphors, kids. Novelists may X-ray the soul and the psyche, but we leave the body to technicians. Not Stanley Elkin. -- New York Times
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Elkin, 1982 winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for George Mills, tells the story of seven terminally ill English children who visit Disney World. Including an audience with a Scrabble-possessed Queen Elizabeth, this work is ``absurd yet convincing and mordantly funny,'' PW stated. (May)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781564782595
Publisher:
Dalkey Archive Press
Publication date:
09/28/2000
Series:
American Literature (Dalkey Archive) Series
Edition description:
1ST DALKEY
Pages:
317
Product dimensions:
5.49(w) x 8.43(h) x 0.74(d)

Meet the Author

Stanley Elkin (1930-1995) was an award-winning author of novels, short stories, and essays. Born in the Bronx, Elkin received his BA and PhD from the University of Illinois and in 1960 became a professor of English at Washington University in St. Louis where he taught until his death. His critically acclaimed works include the National Book Critics Circle Award-winners "George Mills" (1982) and "Mrs. Ted Bliss" (1995), as well as the National Book Award finalists "The Dick Gibson Show" (1972), "Searches and Seizures "(1974), and "The MacGuffin" (1991). His book of novellas, "Van Gogh's Room at Arles", was a finalist for the PEN Faulkner Award.

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The Magic Kingdom 1.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Fairy-Godmummy More than 1 year ago
I actually wish I could give this book a zero stars but I don't think it will let me. The book is ridiculous, incoherent, confusing, and just plain boring. I wish I could get those hours of my life back. I had to stop reading it three times and read other books just to remind myself that I do indeed like to read. I usually stop reading a book after 100 pages if I don't like it but I forced myself to finish this one so that I could accurately let other readers know that it is totally not worth reading. Spare yourself. Skip this one.
Rita Hughes More than 1 year ago
ya im 11 to but seriously this is BARBIE and its dumb
eins1776 More than 1 year ago
I picked this up...well, I actually had to order it, since no one had it in stock...after reading about it in NY Magazine. It was listed as one of the top ten humor books by a humor book writer. Its a fun read. Very dry and very British, which I was unaware of until reading the first few lines, but quite funny and thought provoking. All of the characters are people I would, most likely, avoid in my real life, but made for good entertainment to follow around Orlando. Actually made Disneyworld a little more apealing to me.