Magic Tree House Fact Tracker #19: Leonardo da Vinci: A Nonfiction Companion to Monday with a Mad Genius (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

Magic Tree House Fact Tracker #19: Leonardo da Vinci: A Nonfiction Companion to Monday with a Mad Genius (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

4.5 15
by Mary Pope Osborne, Salvatore Murdocca
     
 

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How did Leonardo da Vinci become interested in flight? What are some of his most famous paintings? Do his scientific ideas measure up to what we know today? Find out the answers to these questions and more in this Magic Tree House Research Guide.

Overview

How did Leonardo da Vinci become interested in flight? What are some of his most famous paintings? Do his scientific ideas measure up to what we know today? Find out the answers to these questions and more in this Magic Tree House Research Guide.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Judy DaPolito
This clear and well-organized exploration of Leonardo da Vinci's life and accomplishments offers its readers additional information about the Renaissance master. The book begins with a two-page introduction from Jack and Annie. The seven chapters that follow are filled with black-and-white drawings and photographs of places, inventions, and art works. Margin drawings of Jack and Annie introduce brief definitions, opinions, and facts about Leonardo's notebooks and his artistic habits. The first of the book's chapters orients the reader to Leonardo's life and to central Italy in the Renaissance. The second chapter describes the city of Florence and Leonardo's life there as an apprentice to Verrocchio, an important artist of the time. It also briefly discusses Leonardo's work on his own as a painter and sculptor before he joined Duke Sforza's court in Milan. In the third chapter, Leonardo's ideas for inventions and experiments are introduced. Though he did not build most of them, he drew plans for such projects as armored cars, bridges, flying machines, submarines, cannons, parachutes, and special cities where sanitation would keep their citizens healthier. The next chapter describes Leonardo's scientific studies. He studied water movement and pressure, storms and weather, plants and fossils. When he studied human anatomy, he even learned to dissect bodies to better understand their composition. The fifth chapter focuses on Leonardo as artist and describes the new painting techniques he used, his studio and apprentices in Milan, and some of his famous works. One that was never finished was to have been a sixteen-foot tall bronze statue of a horse, but when the French invaded Milan thebronze had to be used for cannons. Two famous works that were completed were the The Last Supper and the Mona Lisa. The last chapter introduces other famous people of Leonardo's time, including the architect Leon Battista Alberti and Michelangelo Buonarroti, the painter and sculptor. The book is one of the "Magic Tree House Research Guides." Following the text is a section about undertaking research using books, museums, videos and DVDs, and the Internet. A five-page index completes the book. A "Stepping Stone Book." Reviewer: Judy DaPolito

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780606018340
Publisher:
Demco Media
Publication date:
01/28/2009
Series:
Magic Tree House Fact Tracker Series, #19
Edition description:
THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY
Pages:
118
Sales rank:
1,229,170
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 7.50(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

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Magic Tree House Fact Tracker #19: Leonardo da Vinci: A Nonfiction Companion to Magic Tree House #38: Monday with a Mad Genius 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 15 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Mia nunes
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love magic tree house books!!!!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
For the Magic Tree House devotee, these research guides are the perfect way to get more information. Also a great way to introduce reluctant readers to non-fiction text.
pamelaharris More than 1 year ago
My 8 yr. old son and I read this in about 3 short sittings. We both love history and art, so it was perfect for our interests. Since we have been to Italy, the setting was particularly meaningful. My son remembered waiting in line to see the Mona Lisa. After reading about it, we reflected on why it may have taken him so many years to complete it and why it is such a powerful work of art that millions of people see each year. We liked the pictures of da Vinci's journal entries and art. We only wish there had been more detail into each of his works....that would have made the book even more interesting for us. But for easy reading, it is a good choice to get a student on the road to more exciting research on da Vinci.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ok?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Robinm5 More than 1 year ago
As always, Mary Pope Osborne has produced an excellent presentation for young students. To the point and yet very interesting. As an adult , I always learn or get reminded once again of some of the most interesting characters and events in history in these books. I recommend all Magic Tree House books and Guides.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
nice
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you like painting read iit
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Best book evveerr!!!!!!&
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Bjfccf
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
IL
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read somethig else!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
V