Magical Child by Joseph Chilton Pearce, Joseph C. Pearce |, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Magical Child

Magical Child

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by Joseph Chilton Pearce, Joseph C. Pearce
     
 

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Magical Child, a classic work, profoundly questioned the current thinking on childbirth pratices, parenting, and educating our children. Now its daring ideas about how Western society is damaging our children, and how we can better nurture them and oruselves, ring truer than ever. From the very instant of birth, says Joseph Chilton Pearce, the human child

Overview

Magical Child, a classic work, profoundly questioned the current thinking on childbirth pratices, parenting, and educating our children. Now its daring ideas about how Western society is damaging our children, and how we can better nurture them and oruselves, ring truer than ever. From the very instant of birth, says Joseph Chilton Pearce, the human child has only one concern: to learn all that there is to learn about the world. This planet is the child's playground, and nothing should interfere with a child's play. Raised this way, the Magical Child is a a happy genius, capable of anything, equipped to fulfill his amazing potential.

Expanding on the ideas of internationally acclaimed child psychologist Jean Piaget, Pearce traces the growth of the mind-brain from brith to adulthood. He connects the alarming rise in autism, hyperkinetic behavior, childhood schizophrenia, and adolescent suicide to the all too common errors we make in raising and educating our children. Then he shows how we can restore the astonishing wealth of creative intelligence that is the brithright of every human being. Pearce challenged all our notions about child rearing, and in the process challenges us to re-examine ourselves. Pearce's message is simple: it is never too late to play, for we are all Magical Children.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"This is the brilliant, provocative, humane synthesis we've been waiting for. I hope Magical Child is read by every parent and parent-to-be, every educator, everyone interested in the future of our society."
—George Leonard, author of Mastery

"An innovative, philosophical restructuring of modern child psychology."
—Publishers Weekly

"A profound, readable, and exciting book."
Library Journal

"This is one of the most important and beautiful books I have ever read. . . . The book is written with the passion of a man who not only cares but knows."
—Colin Turnbull

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780452267893
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
03/28/1992
Edition description:
Reissue
Pages:
272
Sales rank:
600,171
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"This is the brilliant, provocative, humane synthesis we've been waiting for. I hope Magical Child is read by every parent and parent-to-be, every educator, everyone interested in the future of our society."
—George Leonard, author of Mastery

"An innovative, philosophical restructuring of modern child psychology."
Publishers Weekly

"A profound, readable, and exciting book."
Library Journal

"This is one of the most important and beautiful books I have ever read. . . . The book is written with the passion of a man who not only cares but knows."
—Colin Turnbull

Meet the Author

Joseph Chilton Pearce is the father of five children and the author of The Crack in the Cosmic Egg, Exploring the Crack in the Cosmic Egg, The Bond of Power, and The Magical Child Matures. A former humanities teacher, he now devotes his time to lecturing and writing.

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Magical Child 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
recubejim More than 1 year ago
Based on the work of Piaget and extensively researched this is the first and last word on child development with a practical application. I am so very happy I did before becoming a father.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
The overall message of this book is important for parents and babies; we need to let babies and children grow and develop. We need to provide stimulation and new experiences. We need to keep the little ones close, provide them security and not force Western-style 'independence' on them. This keeping close means a natural birth, breastfeeding, holding and talking to- not getting our children attached to things.

I'm just not certain the author reached his conclusions in a way that I endorse since he says many things I absolutely disagree with. In the first chapter, he says about our brains and grey matter, 'the amount we have is just what we need for certain goals nature has in mind, such as our dominion over the earth.'! I really have a hard time believing that evolution is goal directed, and that humans should have 'dominion' over the earth. We have no right to that, and we are destroying the earth as a result of trying to be in control of this planet.

The chapter on 'maintaining the matrix', or how to birth babies naturally, is taken right out of LeBoyer's work 'Birth without Violence'- a fine book but not without it's flaws. This chapter also explores the development of the naturally birthed and nurtured infant, or at least the ones the author observed in Uganda. These babies are developmentally ahead of the medically birthed babies in Western society, so he says. They push up at birth, sit up at a couple months, run (not just walk!) at 7 months of age. Humph! Amazing babies, right? My baby born by c-section walked and talked much earlier than my naturally born-at-home babies. What happened?!

I don't particularly like the language of this book, but it will work for a lot of people. Many of us in breastfeeding advocacy work learn that people don't always learn intellectually, but they do learn *emotionally*. If some mothers learn to nurture their babies in a hands-on way because of the emotional discussion in this book, more power to them.