×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Magnetic South/Loose Salute
     

Magnetic South/Loose Salute

4.0 1
by Michael Nesmith
 
This European two-fer CD contains Michael "Papa Nez" Nesmith's first two post-Monkees recordings -- Magnetic South and Loose Salute -- as a member of the First National Band. Although the heavily orchestrated Wichita Train Whistle Sings (1968) is credited to Nesmith as a solo artist, it was technically

Overview

This European two-fer CD contains Michael "Papa Nez" Nesmith's first two post-Monkees recordings -- Magnetic South and Loose Salute -- as a member of the First National Band. Although the heavily orchestrated Wichita Train Whistle Sings (1968) is credited to Nesmith as a solo artist, it was technically released while he was still a Monkee. As a bonus for collectors, this single-disc anthology also includes the instrumental track "1st National Dance." As enthusiasts of post-Headquarters Monkees will assuredly attest, Nesmith's country & western-flavored material is not only the highlight of those albums, but arguably the only worthwhile tracks on them. During his tenuous final days as a pop idol, Nesmith took full advantage of the unique situation by recording his compositions outside of the Monkees pre-manufactured confines -- using his own musicians. Several of those tracks are revisited on these recordings. Among them, "Calico Girlfriend," "Nine Times Blue," "Little Red Rider," "Crippled Lion," "Hollywood," and "Conversations" were recorded and available for potential inclusion on the last three Monkees long-players that Nesmith had any involvement in -- The Birds, the Bees & the Monkees, Instant Replay, and The Monkees Present. The First National Band featured Red O.J. Rhodes (pedal steel guitar), Glen D. Hardin (keyboards), John London (bass), and John Ware (drums). Along with Nesmith (guitar/vocals), they provided a tight yet sublimely down-home platform for Papa Nez to weave his unique brand of country-rock -- which was in its infancy at the time. Other West Coast artists such as the Eagles, the post-David Crosby Byrds, and the Flying Burrito Brothers were creating similar sounds and providing an alternative to the recently unleashed aural attack of heavy metal. Although the prolific nature of Nesmith's writing during the late '60s and early '70s is evidenced on both Magnetic South and Loose Salute, he reworks two Hank Cochran/Harlan Howard standards, "I Fall to Pieces" and "Beyond the Blue Horizon," with sensitivity and to tremendous effect. These are among the highlights of both recordings as well as this era of Nesmith's career.

Product Details

Release Date:
05/02/2000
Label:
Camden International
UPC:
0743216604425
catalogNumber:
166044
Rank:
52560

Tracks

Album Credits

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Magnetic South/Loose Salute 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
With the late-1969 end of his involvement with The Monkees, Mike Nesmith began his ''solo'' career with The First National Band and the two albums compiled together on this CD. Though largely ignored by the music press and DJs, Nesmith's albums have stood the test of time as pioneering efforts in country rock, and compare most favoriably with modern ''country'' popsters like the Dixie Chicks, Shania Twain, Martina McBride, and Billy Ray Cyrus - Nesmith's work even manages to outdo all of them. With longtime cohort John London on bass, John Ware on drums, and Orville ''Red'' Rhodes on pedal steel, Mike gets going with a triple-header - Calico Girlfriend-Nine Times Blue-Little Red Rider. Calico displays the energetic melodies Mike had used on songs like Papa Gene's Blues and God Clean Fun, while Nine Times Blue displays that Mike could leave The Monkees but The Monkees couldn't quite be purged from Mike - perhaps sensing that fans would still associate him with Micky, Davy, and Peter, Mike double-tracks vocals in a number of his songs to create a harmony effect like that of Micky Dolenz; it shows very well in Nine Times Blue and briefly in the more rock-oriented Little Red Rider. The Monkees influence shows again in the humorous closing tag First National Rag. Hollywood is one of Mike's best efforts, segueing from soft tension to full throttle and back again; the only flaw is the excessively long fade. Silver Moon opens the Loose Salute portion of this double-player and is a splendid country number followed by Mike's tender cover of Patsy Cline's I Fall To Pieces. Humor then returns in Dedicated Friend, then Mike forsees the Latin revolution of Gloria Estefan and Ricky Martin in Tengo Amore - and once again betters his successors. His most haunting number is the bluesy Lady Of The Valley, once again featuring double-tracked vocals that sound like Mike is still dueting with Micky Dolenz. Mike then goes the whole route when he multitracks the chorus vocals of the jazzy Hello Lady so that it sounds like Peter and Davy have rejoined Micky and Mike. Closing out the CD is the previously unreleased dance instrumental First National Dance, and it gets the feet moving to signal Mike Nesmith's stature as a country-rock pioneer.