The Magnificent Ambersons [NOOK Book]

Overview

Pulitzer Prize Winner - 1919

The Magnificent Ambersons is a 1918 novel by Booth Tarkington which won the 1919 Pulitzer Prize. It was the second novel in the Growth trilogy, which included The Turmoil (1915) and The Midlander (1923, retitled National Avenue in 1927). In 1942 Orson Welles directed a film version, also titled The Magnificent Ambersons.
The novel and trilogy traces the growth of the United States...
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The Magnificent Ambersons

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Overview

Pulitzer Prize Winner - 1919

The Magnificent Ambersons is a 1918 novel by Booth Tarkington which won the 1919 Pulitzer Prize. It was the second novel in the Growth trilogy, which included The Turmoil (1915) and The Midlander (1923, retitled National Avenue in 1927). In 1942 Orson Welles directed a film version, also titled The Magnificent Ambersons.
The novel and trilogy traces the growth of the United States through the declining fortunes of three generations of the aristocratic Amberson family in a fictional Mid-Western town, between the end of the Civil War and the early part of the 20th century, a period of rapid industrialization and socio-economic change in America. The decline of the Ambersons is contrasted with the rising fortunes of industrial tycoons and other new-money families, which did not derive power from family names but by "doing things". As George Amberson's friend (name unspecified) says, "don't you think being things is 'rahthuh bettuh' than doing things?"
"The Magnificent Ambersons is perhaps Tarkington's best novel," said Van Wyck Brooks. "[It is] a typical story of an American family and town—the great family that locally ruled the roost and vanished virtually in a day as the town spread and darkened into a city. This novel no doubt was a permanent page in the social history of the United States, so admirably conceived and written was the tale of the Ambersons, their house, their fate and the growth of the community in which they were submerged in the end."
Even though the story is set in a fictitious city, it was inspired by Tarkington's hometown of Indianapolis and the neighborhood he once lived in, Woodruff Place.
Source: Wikipedia
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940012395306
  • Publisher: RainWall Publishing
  • Publication date: 3/21/2011
  • Series: Pulitzer Prize Winners , #3
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 457 KB

Meet the Author

Newton Booth Tarkington (July 29, 1869 – May 19, 1946) was an
American novelist and dramatist best known for his Pulitzer
Prize-winning novels The Magnificent Ambersons and Alice Adams.
Booth Tarkington was born in Indianapolis, the son of John S.
Tarkington and Elizabeth Booth Tarkington. He was named after his
maternal uncle Newton Booth, then the governor of California. He
first attended Purdue University but graduated from Princeton
University in 1893. While at Princeton he was editor of the Nassau
Literary Magazine and formed the Princeton Triangle Club. He was
also voted the most popular man in his class. When Tarkington's
class graduated in 1893 he lacked sufficient credits for a degree
at Princeton, where he attended classes for two years. His later
achievements, however, won him an honorary A.M. in 1899 and an
honorary Litt.D. in 1918. He was one of the most popular American
novelists of his time, with The Two Vanrevels and Mary's Neck
appearing on the annual best-seller lists nine times. Tarkington's
best known work today is The Magnificent Ambersons, due in part to
its famous treatment by Orson Welles in 1942 and its frequently
favored listing on the Modern Library's list of top-100 novels. It
was the second volume in Tarkington's Growth trilogy, which traced
the growth of the United States through the decline of the
once-powerful and aristocratic Amberson family dynasty, contrasted
against the rise of industrial tycoons and "new money" families in
the economic boom years after the Civil War leading up to World War
I. Tarkington donated substantially to Purdue University and has
been recognized for his philanthropy. Tarkington Hall, an all-men's
residence hall at Purdue, is named in honor of him. Source:
Wikipedia
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 29 )
Rating Distribution

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(9)

4 Star

(12)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

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1 Star

(1)

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Sort by: Showing all of 20 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 18, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Lives in Transition

    Barnes & Noble must be commended for keeping in prints lesser known literary works. The Magnificent Andersons is a novel about transition. An upper class waspy family, and its place in society, is forever changed by the coming of the automobile and other industries and the period of massive immigration in the early 20th century. The main character, George Amberson, is a callow youth who becomes a victim not just of these forces, but of his own insistence on trying to hold on to the world he knew-of strict social structures where wealthy male protestants held power through birth not merit. This insistence results in tragedy, denying his mother the true love of her life and leaving his spinster aunt in abject poverty. Family love and loyalty may triumph-these are values George holds dear and lives up to-but they do nothing to prevent the destruction of an old way of life. In spite of some clunky sentences, Tarkington is an objective observer of events. I remember liking the Orson Wells film, the book is just as good. I even liked the old fashion over use of foreshadowing. Please visit: timothyherrick.blogspot.com

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 5, 2012

    Mostly, this is a good, old classic. I was surprised to discover

    Mostly, this is a good, old classic. I was surprised to discover it had won a Pulitzer Prize, but I realize that this was written in a different time period. It is hard to read this book from their frame of reference.

    Mostly, the book goes along at a nice clip. The characters are well-developed, and the dialogue is what one would expect from this time period and this privileged cast of characters.

    Realism is what drives this story. If you are looking for a romantic story where everyone lives happily after, I recommend you look elsewhere. I could have done without the psychic portion of the book, but at least there was no sex nor profanity.

    I think the author's most exquisite moment was when he wrote about the changes that occurred as times changed in the U.S. and the priveleged classes moved onward. That is probably what earned him an award.


    And what of the story? I would say that the story is engaging enough, but I am not particularly fond of the ending. I did appreciate the reality of the story. I suppose that explains the ending. Realistic stories often have no conclusion.

    I was provided with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I was not financially compensated, and all opinions are 100 percent mine.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 17, 2012

    "Magnificent!"

    The book is entertaining and relatable. It also paints a clear picture of society during the turn of the century. Anyone would enjoy this book!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 1, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Okay

    Just a Meh book

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2009

    A Classic

    There are reasons that some books are classics. This is a good example. It is as relevant today as in the time period it was written. The plot and characters stay with you. I guess the "entitled" have always existed!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2008

    Wonderful!!

    Tarkington shows how far one young man can sink into utter misery and then rise to redemption. This book should be required reading in American high schools.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2006

    pride before the fall

    A great story of one of the most important families in history, The Ambersons.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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    Posted July 1, 2010

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    Posted November 1, 2009

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    Posted October 28, 2008

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    Posted August 2, 2009

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    Posted April 7, 2011

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    Posted February 27, 2012

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    Posted January 26, 2010

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