Magyk (Septimus Heap Series #1)

Magyk (Septimus Heap Series #1)

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by Angie Sage, Mark Zug
     
 

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The Magyk Begins Here

Septimus Heap, the seventh son of the seventh son, disappears the night he is born, pronounced dead by the midwife. That same night, the baby's father, Silas Heap, comes across an abandoned child in the snow — a newborn girl with violet eyes. The Heaps take her into their home, name her Jenna, and raise her as

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Overview

The Magyk Begins Here

Septimus Heap, the seventh son of the seventh son, disappears the night he is born, pronounced dead by the midwife. That same night, the baby's father, Silas Heap, comes across an abandoned child in the snow — a newborn girl with violet eyes. The Heaps take her into their home, name her Jenna, and raise her as their own. But who is this mysterious baby girl, and what really happened to their beloved son Septimus?

Editorial Reviews

Listen up, all Harry Potter fans (especially the younger ones): A new wizard has come to town. Actually, the arrival of Septimus Heap, the "seventh son of a seventh son," is a tad unusual. He is stolen at birth and pronounced dead all in the first chapter. That same night, his wizard family finds and takes in another child, Jenna, who grows into a plucky young heroine with an enigmatic heritage of her own. Rest assured, though, the boy wizard is alive and kicking-as is this first book in a suspenseful new series full of intrigue, medieval atmosphere, light humor, and a fresh take on the world of magic. (ages 8 to 12)
Child magazine's Best Children's Book Awards 2005
Publishers Weekly
This debut novel introduces the seventh son of a seventh son, who is destined to have deep magical powers. But in order to protect him, his identity must remain a secret. "The author eventually reveals the real Septimus in a clever, if predictable, turn of events," PW wrote. Ages 9-up. (Mar.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Dark things are astir the night Septimus Heap is born, the seventh son of a seventh son. But he is stillborn, and the Heaps are devastated. They are somewhat mollified by the mysterious introduction of another baby, who is herself more than she appears. The Heap girl grows up in a tense world of selfish, evil Castle rulers who forbid all use and teaching of Magyk, until a chain of events begins that will cause the truth to be revealed. The first in a series, this story makes use of the themes of identity and belonging, perhaps not altogether originally, but with strong family bonds and interesting characters. Older children may find they have guessed a twist or two before they occur, but will read on anyway. 2005, HarperCollins, and Ages 8 to 12.
—Vicky Ludas
VOYA
Two things about the book are annoying: the lack of a map inside the book and overly coincidental events. Other than those flaws, it is on par with Harry Potter and other fantasy novels I have enjoyed. Although the plot and story might be a bit predictable for older readers, they will enjoy it just the same. The unique world is full of magical beings and people. Once the book got hold of me, I couldn't put it down. Anyone who enjoys a good fantasy novel will enjoy Sage's first book of Septimus Heap. VOYA CODES: 5Q 4P M J (Hard to imagine it being any better written; Broad general YA appeal; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9). 2005, Katherine Tegen Books/HarperCollins, 576p., and PLB Ages 11 to 15.
—Patrick Darby, Teen Reviewer
School Library Journal
Gr 4-8-A wide cast of characters battle the forces of Darke Magyk in a well-realized world of fantasy. At birth, Septimus Heap is carried away for dead, and his father, Silas Heap, is entrusted with a baby girl. When the villainous Supreme Custodian tries to assassinate the now 10-year-old Jenna, who, it turns out, is the daughter of the murdered queen, the girl flees to the Marram Marshes along with some family members, the ExtraOrdinary Wizard, and a young army guard known only as "Boy 412." Pursued by the servants of the Necromancer DomDaniel, and aided by an engaging array of magical beings, they finally prevail in a satisfying and fairly exciting conclusion. Despite the hefty length, the novel is quite easy to follow. Many creative magical elements, such as the deliciously repulsive Magogs, add to the fun. Frequent point-of-view shifts give a well-rounded picture of the multiple plot threads and add many opportunities for light humor. On the other hand, with so many characters represented, it's hard to feel strong empathy for any of them. Jenna, the Queenling, and Boy 412, in particular, nearly emerge as full-blooded individuals at times, but neither quite stands out as an engaging hero. Villains are well drawn and varied, and most are more comical than truly menacing. The ease with which a once-formidable enemy like the Hunter is finally dispatched, however, detracts a bit from the eventual triumph of the protagonists. Overall, this is a fine choice for fantasy readers looking to delve into a new world with lots of magic, plenty of action, and a few neat surprises.-Steven Engelfried, Beaverton City Library, OR Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Heads up, Harry, there's a new young wizard on his way up. Ten years after a complicated bit of baby-switching, young Jenna learns that she's not a member of the tumultuous Heap household (six boys, just imagine), but a hidden Princess. The revelation comes as she's being swept to safety, her life forfeit to a crew of thoroughly knavish baddies headed by Necromancer DomDaniel. Along the way, she and her protector, ExtraOrdinary Wizard Marcia Overstrand pick up not only an assortment of fugitive Heaps, but an orphaned pipsqueak dubbed "Boy 412"-who gradually exhibits stunning powers of Magyk, as the local brand of spellcasting is dubbed. Tongue firmly in cheek, Sage creates a vividly realized world in which pens and rocks can display minds of their own, and a forest "still had a bad wolverine problem at night, and was infested with carnivorous trees." Ultimately, Jenna and Co. overcome all such obstacles, as well as their sly, dangerous, but bumbling adversaries, and Boy 412's (thoroughly telegraphed) true identity comes out. A quick-reading, stand-alone, deliciously spellbinding series opener. (Web site) (Fantasy. 10-13)
The Bulletin for the Center for Children's Books
“This first book in the Septimus Heap series is a cheerful, clever offering.”
Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
“This first book in the Septimus Heap series is a cheerful, clever offering.”
Child Magazine
“A fresh take on the world of magic.”
Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books
"This first book in the Septimus Heap series is a cheerful, clever offering."
Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
“This first book in the Septimus Heap series is a cheerful, clever offering.”

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061757068
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
10/13/2009
Series:
Septimus Heap Series , #1
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
704
Sales rank:
25,861
Lexile:
640L (what's this?)
File size:
3 MB
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Angie Sage was born in London and grew up in the Thames Valley, London, and Kent. She now lives in Somerset in a very old house that has a 480-year-old painting of King Henry VIII on the wall. The seven books in her original Septimus Heap series are international bestsellers. She is also the author of the Araminta Spookie series.

Mark Zug has illustrated many collectible card games, including Magic: The Gathering and Dune, as well as books and magazines. He lives in Pennsylvania.

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