Mahler and His World

Paperback (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$32.81
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $13.25
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 64%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (10) from $13.25   
  • New (3) from $32.30   
  • Used (7) from $0.00   

Overview

From the composer's lifetime to the present day, Gustav Mahler's music has provoked extreme responses from the public and from experts. Poised between the Romantic tradition he radically renewed and the austere modernism whose exponents he inspired, Mahler was a consummate public persona and yet an impassioned artist who withdrew to his lakeside hut where he composed his vast symphonies and intimate song cycles. His advocates have produced countless studies of the composer's life and work. But they have focused on analysis internal to the compositions, along with their programmatic contexts.

In this volume, musicologists and historians turn outward to examine the broader political, social, and literary changes reflected in Mahler's music. Peter Franklin takes up questions of gender, Talia Pecker Berio examines the composer's Jewish identity, and Thomas Peattie, Charles S. Maier, and Karen Painter consider, respectively, contemporary theories of memory, the theatricality of Mahler's art and fin-de-siècle politics, and the impinging confrontation with mass society. The private world of Gustav Mahler, in his songs and late works, is explored by leading Austrian musicologist Peter Revers and a German counterpart, Camilla Bork, and by the American Mahler expert Stephen Hefling.

Mahler's symphonies challenged Europeans and Americans to experience music in new ways. Before his decision to move to the United States, the composer knew of the enthusiastic response from America's urban musical audiences. Mahler and His World reproduces reviews of these early performances for the first time, edited by Zoë Lang. The Mahler controversy that polarized Austrians and Germans also unfolds through a series of documents heretofore unavailable in English, edited by Painter and Bettina Varwig, and the terms of the debate are examined by Leon Botstein in the context of the late-twentieth-century Mahler revival.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

BBC Music Magazine
[A] valuable addition to the Mahler library.
The New York Times
The best thing in the [Bard Music] festival could have been enjoyed in the cool quiet of one's study: Ms. Painter's book. . . . The highlight is Mr. Botstein's own essay, a typically virtuosic riff on Theodor W. Adorno's book on Mahler. . . . But the book's other essays—on performance in late-19th-century Central Europe as a political statement on Mahle''s Jewishness, on gender issues and Ms. Painter's own discussion of the mass public gestures in Mahler's big works (especially the 'Symphony of a Thousand) and their connection to socialist cultural policy—are all worth reading. As are the musical analyses and the period reviews.
— John Rockwell
The New York Times' - John Rockwell
The best thing in the [Bard Music] festival could have been enjoyed in the cool quiet of one's study: Ms. Painter's book. . . . The highlight is Mr. Botstein's own essay, a typically virtuosic riff on Theodor W. Adorno's book on Mahler. . . . But the book's other essays—on performance in late-19th-century Central Europe as a political statement on Mahle''s Jewishness, on gender issues and Ms. Painter's own discussion of the mass public gestures in Mahler's big works (especially the 'Symphony of a Thousand) and their connection to socialist cultural policy—are all worth reading. As are the musical analyses and the period reviews.
From the Publisher
"The best thing in the [Bard Music] festival could have been enjoyed in the cool quiet of one's study: Ms. Painter's book. . . . The highlight is Mr. Botstein's own essay, a typically virtuosic riff on Theodor W. Adorno's book on Mahler. . . . But the book's other essays—on performance in late-19th-century Central Europe as a political statement on Mahle''s Jewishness, on gender issues and Ms. Painter's own discussion of the mass public gestures in Mahler's big works (especially the 'Symphony of a Thousand) and their connection to socialist cultural policy—are all worth reading. As are the musical analyses and the period reviews."—John Rockwell, The New York Times'

"[A] valuable addition to the Mahler library."—BBC Music Magazine

The New York Times
The best thing in the [Bard Music] festival could have been enjoyed in the cool quiet of one's study: Ms. Painter's book. . . . The highlight is Mr. Botstein's own essay, a typically virtuosic riff on Theodor W. Adorno's book on Mahler. . . . But the book's other essays--on performance in late-19th-century Central Europe as a political statement on Mahle''s Jewishness, on gender issues and Ms. Painter's own discussion of the mass public gestures in Mahler's big works (especially the 'Symphony of a Thousand) and their connection to socialist cultural policy--are all worth reading. As are the musical analyses and the period reviews.
— John Rockwell
The New York Times
The best thing in the [Bard Music] festival could have been enjoyed in the cool quiet of one's study: Ms. Painter's book. . . . The highlight is Mr. Botstein's own essay, a typically virtuosic riff on Theodor W. Adorno's book on Mahler. . . . But the book's other essays—on performance in late-19th-century Central Europe as a political statement on Mahle''s Jewishness, on gender issues and Ms. Painter's own discussion of the mass public gestures in Mahler's big works (especially the 'Symphony of a Thousand) and their connection to socialist cultural policy—are all worth reading. As are the musical analyses and the period reviews.
— John Rockwell
Patrick Smith
Mahler's pre-eminent position in Vienna during that city's most fecund artistic period, 1880-1905, allowed him to come into contact with the intelligentsia of the time, and his uncompromising artistic standards as conductor and impresario meant controversy and consequent scandal in gossip-ridden, anti-Semitic Vienna. Most of these topics were addressed and discussed during the festival itself, as well as in the essays of Mahler and His World, edited by Karen Painter.
Wall Street Journal
Library Journal
This is the 13th volume in an annual series, produced by the Bard Music Festival, that examines the cultural, political, and social contexts in which composers lived and worked. Harvard musicologist Painter begins by placing nine scholarly articles on Mahler into two large groupings: Part 1, "Context and Ideologies," and Part 2, "Analysis and Aesthetics." In the first section, Bard president Leon Botstein, also a noted conductor, provides an excellent, lengthy overview of the history of the critical response to Mahler's music in the 20th century. There are several other noteworthy articles in this section, including Talia Pecker Berio's article on Mahler and Judaism and Painter's own contribution on the legacy of the Eighth Symphony. In Part 2, Peter Bevers's analysis of the Kindertotenlieder and Stephen Hefling's "Aspects of Mahler's Late Style" are standout achievements. The latter is the only essay in the entire collection that requires knowledge of advanced music theory. Parts 3 and 4 deal with press notices of Mahler's work in American and German publications, respectively. Readers will enjoy comparing the relatively na ve comments made by American journalists 100 years ago with those of their more sophisticated colleagues in Germany and Austria. Painter herself, along with colleague Bettina Warvig, has provided excellent translations of the German reviews and obituaries. This is a valuable work for undergraduate and graduate collections.-Larry Lipkis, Moravian Coll., Bethlehem, PA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691092447
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 7/29/2002
  • Series: Bard Music Festival Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 408
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.18 (h) x 0.96 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface and Acknowledgments xi
PART I: CONTEXT AND IDEOLOGIES
Whose Gustav Mahler? Reception, Interpretation, and History by LEON BOTSTEIN I
Mahler's Theater: The Performative and the Political in Central Europe, 1890-1910 by CHARLES S. MAIER 55
Mahler's Jewish Parable by TALIA PECKER BERIO 87
A Soldier's Sweetheart's Mother's Tale? Mahler's Gendered Musical Discourse by PETER FRANKLIN 111
The Aesthetics of Mass Culture: Mahler's Eighth Symphony and Its Legacy by KAREN PAINTER 127
PART II: ANALYSIS AND AESTHETICS
Musical Lyricism as Self-Exploration: Reflections on Mahler's "Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen" by CAMILLA BORK AND TRANSLATED BY IRENE ZEDLACHER 159
". . . the heart-wrenching sound of farewell": Mahler, Riickert, and the Kindertotenlieder by PETER REVERS AND TRANSLATED BY IRENE ZEDLACHER 173
In Search of Lost Time: Memory and Mahler's Broken Pastoral by THOMAS PEATTIE 185
Aspects of Mahler's Late Style by STEPHEN E. HEFLING 199
PART III: MAHLER'S AMERICAN DEBUT: The Reception of the Fourth and Fifth Symphonies, 1904-1906 by EDITED BY ZÖE LANG
Introduction 227
Mahler's Fourth Symphony in New York 230
"Gustav Mahler-His Personality and His New Symphony" RICHARD ALDRICH
"First Concert of Symphony Orchestra . . . Mahler Heard" (New York Times) "What Did It All Mean?. . ." (The Musical Courier)
The American Premiere of Mahler's Fifth Symphony 239
Program Notes, Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra EMMA L. ROEDTER
Boston Symphony Orchestra 240
"Gustav Mahler: The Composer . . . Boston First Hears . . ." AUGUST SPANUTH
Program Notes, Boston Symphony Orchestra PHILIP HALE
"A Symphony by Mahler for the First Time" HENRY TAYLOR PARKER
East Coast Tour 253
"Mahler's Fifth Symphony. . . " (Philadelphia Evening Bulletin)
"A New Symphony by Gustav Mahler. . . " RICHARD ALDRICH
"Fifth Symphony Played . . . " (New York Times) "Variations" LEONARD LEIBLING
PART IV: MAHLER'S GERMAN-LANGUAGE CRITICS EDITED AND TRANSLATED BY KAREN PAINTER AND BETTINA VARWIG
Introduction 267
Mahler As Conductor 272
"Gustav Mahler and the Vienna Court Opera" ELSA BIENENFELD
"Gustav Mahler as Organizer" EMIL GUTMANN
"Mahler as Director" HERMANN BAHR
The First Symphony 283
"A First Symphony" MAX GRAF
"Theater & Art Reviews: Second Philharmonic Concert" EDUARD HANSLICK
"Viennese Musical Letter" THEODOR HELM
"Feuilleton: Philharmonic Concert" ROBERT HIRSCHFELD
The Fifth Symphony 298
"Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 5" ERNST OTTO NODNAGEL
"Fourteenth Philharmonic Concert" MAX LOEWENGARD
"Feuilleton: Gustav Mahler and His Symphony" MAX KALBECK
"Feuilleton: Mahler's 'Fifth"' GUSTAV SCHÖNAICH
The Seventh Symphony 316
"Mahler's 'Seventh Symphony"' FELIX ADLER
"Gustav Mahler's 'Seventh"' RICHARD BATKA
"Mahler's Seventh Symphony" ELSA BIENENFELD
"Feuilleton: Mahler's Seventh Symphony" JULIUS KORNGOLD
Das Lied von der Erde 332
"Feuilleton: Das Lied von der Erde" RICHARD SPECHT
"Gustav Mahler: Las Lied von der Erde" RUDOLF LOUIS
"Fourth Philharmonic Concert: Das Lied von der Erde" FERDINAND PFOHL
Obituaries 344
"Gustav Mahler" ROBERT HIRSCHFELD
"Gustav Mahler" PAUL BEKKER
"Gustav Mahler" ADOLF WEISSMANN
"Gustav Mahler" PAUL ZSCHORLICH
The Mahler Amsterdam Festival, 1920 357
"The Mahler Festival in Amsterdam" OSKAR BIE
"A Musician's journey to Holland" PAUL STEFAN
"The Mahler Festival in Amsterdam" GUIDO ADLER
"A Second Letter from Amsterdam" OSKAR BIE
Notes on Contributors 391

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)