Mahler: Symphony No. 1, Songs of a Wayfarer by Rafael Kubelik | 28944973525 | CD | Barnes & Noble
Mahler: Symphony No. 1, Songs of a Wayfarer

Mahler: Symphony No. 1, Songs of a Wayfarer

5.0 1
by Rafael Kubelik
     
 
True to form, Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau makes the cycle more dramatic than anyone. His wayfarer is febrile, neurotic, even more so in 1968 with Rafael Kubelík than in his earlier version with Furtwängler.

Overview

True to form, Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau makes the cycle more dramatic than anyone. His wayfarer is febrile, neurotic, even more so in 1968 with Rafael Kubelík than in his earlier version with Furtwängler.

Product Details

Release Date:
05/13/1997
Label:
Deutsche Grammophon
UPC:
0028944973525
catalogNumber:
449735
Rank:
17268

Related Subjects

Tracks

  1. Symphony No. 1 in D major ("Titan")  - Gustav Mahler  -  Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra  - Gustav Mahler  - Alan Newcombe  - Lionel Salter  - Stewart Spencer  - Gustav Klimt  - Otto Gerdes
  2. Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen, song cycle for voice & piano (or orchestra)  - Gustav Mahler  - Gustav Mahler  -  Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra  - Wilifried Daenicke  - Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau  - Gustav Klimt  - Alan Newcombe  - Hartmut Pfeiffer  - Lionel Salter  - Stewart Spencer
  3. Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen, cycle of songs (4) for voice & piano (or orchestra): Ging heut' morgen übers Feld  - Gustav Mahler  - Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau  -  Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra  - Hartmut Pfeiffer  - Gustav Mahler  - Alan Newcombe  - Lionel Salter  - Stewart Spencer  - Gustav Klimt  - Wilifried Daenicke
  4. Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen, cycle of songs (4) for voice & piano (or orchestra): Ich hab' ein glühend Messer  - Gustav Mahler  - Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau  -  Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra  - Hartmut Pfeiffer  - Gustav Mahler  - Alan Newcombe  - Lionel Salter  - Stewart Spencer  - Gustav Klimt  - Wilifried Daenicke
  5. Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen, cycle of songs (4) for voice & piano (or orchestra): Die zwei blauen Augen  - Gustav Mahler  - Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau  -  Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra  - Hartmut Pfeiffer  - Gustav Mahler  - Alan Newcombe  - Lionel Salter  - Stewart Spencer  - Gustav Klimt  - Wilifried Daenicke

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Mahler: Symphony No1; Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen Nos1-4 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
TDS-PA More than 1 year ago
This is one of DG's "Originals--Legendary Recordings from the DG Catalogue," and it more than deserves its label. Kubelik was the conductor who broke through almost half a century of silence when it came to Mahler in Germany; when he recorded this in 1968, most Germans had not heard a performance of Mahler since the Nazis effectively banned him as a "degenerate" (i.e. Jewish at birth, though he later converted to Catholicism) composer. Having been fortunate to hear Barenboim conduct this symphony with his Staatskapelle in Berlin in 2006, it is obvious that Germans today have no lack of familiarity or appreciation of him. Most would agree that Mahler is one of the three greatest symphonists in history (with Beethoven and Brahms), and his First, while not of the same stature as his later works, is a wonderful indicator of things to come. Kubelik's interpretation is not quite as exciting as Solti's on Decca or Abbado's (live on DG), but it is well worth having for any Mahler fan, especially given its historical significance. The bonus is Fischer-Dieskau singing the Lieder Eines Fahrenden Gesellen (Songs of a Wayfarer), a wonderful set of four songs with orchestra which are similar in setting and mood to Schubert's Winterreise. This is the best recording available of the Lieder, sung by arguably the greatest of all baritones at the height of his vocal prowess, so it alone makes the disc worthwhile. The notes include two essays and a complete translation of the songs' lyrics, which were written by Mahler himself early in his career and are fascinating to read now in light of the triumph and tragedy of his life to come. I would recommend this disc to anyone who loves (or would like to experience) Mahler.