Mahler: Symphony No. 10

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Blair Sanderson
Although several completions of Gustav Mahler's unfinished "Symphony No. 10" 1911 exist, from the fanciful ground-breaker by Clinton Carpenter to later idiomatic reconstructions by Joe Wheeler and Remo Mazzetti, Jr., Deryck Cooke's performing version of 1964 is the most famous of all, due not only to the controversies surrounding it, but also to the fact that it was the first to be commercially recorded. The 1965 Columbia Masterworks recording by the Philadelphia Orchestra under Eugene Ormandy appeared at the peak of the Mahler revival, and positive critical reception gave it a cachet that lasted for many years, long after the demise of vinyl. Originally released as a ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Blair Sanderson
Although several completions of Gustav Mahler's unfinished "Symphony No. 10" 1911 exist, from the fanciful ground-breaker by Clinton Carpenter to later idiomatic reconstructions by Joe Wheeler and Remo Mazzetti, Jr., Deryck Cooke's performing version of 1964 is the most famous of all, due not only to the controversies surrounding it, but also to the fact that it was the first to be commercially recorded. The 1965 Columbia Masterworks recording by the Philadelphia Orchestra under Eugene Ormandy appeared at the peak of the Mahler revival, and positive critical reception gave it a cachet that lasted for many years, long after the demise of vinyl. Originally released as a double LP, Ormandy's historic performance is at last reissued in Sony's Great Performances series with direct stream digital remastering, original cover art, and full liner notes, so those who want to hear Cooke's first full edition of the "Tenth" may now enjoy it with the convenience of having the whole work on one CD. Yet this refurbished analog recording will not satisfy everyone, since its sound is noticeably fuzzy in the leanest, most exposed passages, and fans of all-digital recordings will find the audio is not as polished as on Riccardo Chailly's, Michael Gielen's, or Simon Rattle's recordings, notwithstanding Sony's remastering. Also, since this version of Mahler's last symphony has its advocates and detractors, some may prefer to investigate the Wheeler reconstruction performed by Robert Olson and the Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra on Naxos, or the rendition by Mazzetti on RCA by Leonard Slatkin and the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra. Having these completions for the sake of comparison is the way to go for the most curious students of Mahler's swan song, but for the average listener's purposes, Ormandy's premiere recording is a satisfactory choice.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 6/6/2006
  • Label: Sony
  • UPC: 828767874227
  • Catalog Number: 67874
  • Sales rank: 85,199

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1–5 Symphony No. 10 in F sharp minor (realization by Deryck Cooke) - Gustav Mahler & Eugene Ormandy (70:12)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Eugene Ormandy Primary Artist
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    The Original Recording of a Complete Mahler's 10th

    It was a delight to see that this historic performance has at last been released on cd. It was recorded in 1965, not long after Deryck Cooke completed his first version of Mahler's last work (which existed only in a fully sketched-out but largely unorchestrated version at the time of the composer's death in 1911).

    While I was never much of a fan of Ormandy, I always enjoyed his performances of Mahler symphonies -- and have remained a great admirer of this recording. I recently listened to my LP version of this performance for the first time in many years after being less than thrilled with hearings of Simon Rattle's and James Levine's versions. The big problem with both the Rattle performance and the Levine performance (which is no longer in print) is that the opening Adagio movement is conducted at such a meandering pace that much of its intensity is lost. Ormandy's performance of the Adagio, by contrast, is quite masterful, with just the right tempos to maintain the forward movement while lingering over and fully developing the most dramatic moments.

    Cooke later revised his score, adding parts for fourth trombone, oboe and bassoon, for example, so that contrapuntal figures could be more fully realized. Those differences show up in the later movements but not in the first, which was the most complete movement in Mahler's original sketch. While there might therefore be reason to prefer other performances of the second, fourth and fifth movements, in particular, the Ormandy performance of those movements has always sounded authentically Mahlerian to me.

    If you enjoy Mahler's music, particularly his other late works like the Ninth and Das Lied von der Erde, you will find much to admire in this recording.

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