The Mailbox

( 61 )

Overview

Vernon Culligan had been dead to the town of Draydon, Virginia, so long that when the crusty Vietnam vet finally died, only one person noticed. Twelve-year-old Gabe grew up in the foster care system until a social worker located his Uncle Vernon two years before. When he comes home to discover that his uncle has died of a heart attack, he's terrifed of going back into the system--so he tells no one. The next day, he discovers a strange note in his mailbox: I HAVE A SECRET. DO ...
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Mailbox

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Overview

Vernon Culligan had been dead to the town of Draydon, Virginia, so long that when the crusty Vietnam vet finally died, only one person noticed. Twelve-year-old Gabe grew up in the foster care system until a social worker located his Uncle Vernon two years before. When he comes home to discover that his uncle has died of a heart attack, he's terrifed of going back into the system--so he tells no one. The next day, he discovers a strange note in his mailbox: I HAVE A SECRET. DO NOT BE AFRAID. And his uncle's body is gone.

Thus begins a unique correspondence destined to save the two people that depended on Vernon for everything. Through flashbacks, we learn about Gabe and Vernon's relationship, and how finding each other saved them both from lives of suffering. But eventually, Vernon's death will be discovered, and how will Gabe and the mystery note writer learn to move forward? THE MAILBOX is not a story about death--though it begins with a death. It's also not a story about Vietnam vets, although the author works with Vietnam veterans and wrote this novel, in part, to illuminate their sacrifices and suffering. THE MAILBOX is a story about connections--about how two people in need can save each other.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Warm and moving, it is an evocative picture of the weblike nature of human existence and the interconnectedness of seemingly disparate experiences.”—School Library Journal

“Shafer’s narrative is heartfelt, earnest and moving. . . and conveys the power of memory to help heal wounds.”—-Kirkus Reviews

From the Publisher
“Warm and moving, it is an evocative picture of the weblike nature of human existence and the interconnectedness of seemingly disparate experiences.”—School Library Journal

“Shafer’s narrative is heartfelt, earnest and moving. . . and conveys the power of memory to help heal wounds.”—-Kirkus Reviews

Children's Literature
After bouncing from one foster home to another, Gabe finally finds a home with his long lost Uncle Vernon in southwest Virginia. Vernon, a Viet Nam vet, is salt of the earth and as salty as they come. A colorful character, he is good to the bone and is raising Gabe with all the right instincts. Gabe returns from his first day of sixth grade to find Vernon dead on his study floor. Not knowing what to do and worried that Vernon's death will mean he will be back in the foster care system, Gabe does nothing. When he comes home from school the following day, the body is gone but a note left there says, "I have a secret. Do not be afraid." What will happen to Gabe, and who left his mysterious note? This is a taut thriller for the younger reader while remaining very much in the realm of possibility. 2006, Delacorte Press, Ages 10 to 14.
—Joan Kindig, Ph.D.
School Library Journal
Gr 5-7-Complex and believably imperfect characters emerge from the first page to the last in this debut novel. Gabe, 12, had been shuffled around the foster-care system for years, until, as a 9-year-old, he was taken to Virginia to an uncle he had never met. Now, two years later, he comes home after the first day of sixth grade to find Uncle Vernon dead. Numb with fear and grief, he tells no one, but the body disappears and mysterious cards begin to appear in his mailbox. As he mourns for his uncle and struggles to honor his memory, readers get to know the strong and caring people surrounding him, and to see the enormous impact made by one scarred and cantankerous, but loving, old man. Uncle Vernon's colloquial voice; the details of successive school days and vignettes of what it means to have a best friend; horrifying glimpses of the Vietnam War, in which Vernon had served, and its aftermath; and sketches of compassionate adults make up some of the bits and pieces of the story. The book is much more than the sum of these parts, however. Warm and moving, it is an evocative picture of the weblike nature of human existence and the interconnectedness of seemingly disparate experiences.-Faith Brautigam, Gail Borden Public Library, Elgin, IL Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
After the Vietnam-veteran uncle he lives with dies, anonymous messages appear in Gabe's mailbox that scare but intrigue the orphaned 12-year-old boy. Then the body disappears. Gabe keeps silent out of fear of being returned to foster care. Flashbacks to life with Uncle Vernon; growing awareness of his uncle's combat experiences; a beloved dog; assurances from the correspondent; and the eventual discovery of the body help Gabe find courage, develop greater self-understanding and finally result in his finding happiness and family. Shafer's narrative is heartfelt, earnest and moving at times and conveys the power of memory to help heal wounds. It also strains credulity-Gabe's secretly fending for himself as long as he does, for example-and some plot details seem too convenient. Moreover, the central question is never answered: How did the secret writer-who turns out to be the corpse robber-know Vernon died? Still, Gabe's likable and the mystery is intriguing and will keep kids guessing. (Fiction. 10-14)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780440421344
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 8/12/2008
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 492,842
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 7.50 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Audrey Shafer lives in California and works as an anesthesiologist at a Veterans Hospital. The author lives in Mountain View, CA.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1

Vernon Culligan was as good as dead to the town of Drayford, Virginia, for so long that when he actually died, not many folks noticed. For decades, his bloodshot eyes, permanent three-day stubble, rifle held over his head, and snarl meaner than a coon dog's had naturally taught everyone to keep a good distance from his property line. The postal delivery truck did venture all the way to the teetering mailbox, and mail was regularly delivered through its yawning trap into the dark, corrugated steel tunnel. Outgoing letters, mostly bill payments, were collected, the addresses written in shaky black ink, as if little spider legs had grouped themselves into crooked letters. Such was the old man's communication with the world.

Twelve-year-old Gable Culligan Pace lived with his uncle in Vernon's simple home cradled within a valley west of Virginia's Blue Ridge, north of Roanoke County. Gabe had arrived in early spring, two and a half years before. Woodland rhododendrons had splashed their purple heads against spikes of sage green as Gabe whizzed by in the backseat of a social worker's Ford Escort.

Over the space of time and in the shadow of the mountains, Gabe came to appreciate, if not understand, many of Uncle Vernon's habits. For instance, Vernon always kept a fan blowing, no matter the season. He preferred the fan to the cabinet full of smoker's lung medicines. So when Gabe arrived home from school and saw his uncle's electric fan lying on the wooden floor in the study, like a turtle that couldn't right itself, Gabe dropped his backpack at the door. He held his breath and crossed the narrow hall. Vernon's chair lay toppled to one side and Vernon himself lay motionless on the floor, flat on his back.

Gabe had never really touched his uncle, though sometimes he had accidentally brushed Vernon's rough hand while passing the margarine tub or clearing the table. Gabe stood by his uncle's work boots and softly called his name. Vernon, a veteran, had had his left leg amputated below the knee during his final tour in Vietnam, thirty-five years before. But with the latest prosthesis, Vernon walked with barely a limp. "The thing's a chore to get on. Can't mau len, can't hurry it up no more, but can't stub my toe, neither!" Gabe saw that the fake foot wasn't angled quite right to the rest of his uncle's body. That twist gave Gabe a little courage. He knelt and touched the plasticized ankle, then moved up, methodically pushing one finger against his uncle's pant leg. He stopped at the thigh, rolled back on his heels, and looked at his uncle's face. Gently he placed a finger on his uncle's cheek.

The skin was cold. Gabe fetched a thick plaid blanket and lay down with his uncle, covering them both. Gabe closed his eyes. Hours later, after dusk had swept the last particles of light from the room, Gabe awoke. He scrambled out from under the blanket, sat hugging his knees on the floor, and cried. Messy crying, the kind of crying that leaves you swollen, red, and leaky. After a while, he snuffled his nose along his arm and sleeve and stared in the direction of the fan. He crawled toward it, fumbled for the switch, and turned it off. The absence of the low rumble startled him. And then he smiled.

Gabe walked into the kitchen, flipped on the light, and fixed himself a peanut butter and honey sandwich. The first bite brought back the first words his uncle ever spoke to him.

"You as skinny as a starved rat. Don't you eat? Come on, let's eat somepin. What'll it be?" Vernon had scowled at Gabe's silence. "Don't tell me they's foisting a dumb one on old Vernon."

When Ms. Rodriguez, the social worker, had nudged Gabe, he'd whispered, "No, sir."

"No, no," answered Vernon. "Let's get one thing straight. I'm no 'sir.' They can save all they's fancy sirs and salutin' for the dress parade. No, life's a jungle, there's no use for sirs in the jungle." Vernon motioned for Gabe to follow him to the kitchen. He laid out different foods on the counter and told Gabe to point to what he liked. Thus the first peanut butter and honey sandwich had been made and eaten under Vernon's roof.

Gabe now carefully cleaned the top of the bear-shaped honey bottle, the way his uncle had taught him. "Clean him right. He don't want no scabby sores atop his head no more'n you do." Then Gabe sat back down at the table and held on to the bear's smooth, golden tummy.

With night pressing its shadows against the windows, and the trees talking night talk, Gabe was not brave enough to go back into his uncle's study. Every evening since he had left the bumpy, eastbound trail of foster care homes and arrived at his uncle's, Gabe would always tell Vernon that he was going to bed.

"G'night, Uncle Vernon."

"Good night, Gabe," his uncle would always reply. Then Vernon would spoon out a ladleful of philosophy like, "Scum-lickin' pus-suckin' buckets of trouble ken happen whether you're good or bad. But why git spit by skunk muck? Stay low and steer clear of screw-ups, Gabe."

Tonight Gabe couldn't bear not hearing his uncle's voice. So he didn't go to bed. Instead, he dozed, on and off, his head on his arms at the kitchen table. In the morning, he changed his shirt and underpants, brushed his teeth, then stood a long time at his uncle's study doorway.

A fly settled on his uncle's cheek and Gabe's eyes widened in terror as the fly walked into his uncle's nostril. Gabe wanted to scream and stamp and change everything there ever was. Maybe he should turn the fan back on. Maybe Uncle Vernon's been dead a long time and that's why he kept the fan on--to make flies buzz off and hide that he'd been dead for years. No, Gabe, that's crazy thinking--he wasn't dead till yesterday, just turn the fan on. Do it, do it! Instead, Gabe shocked himself and did something that would later fill him with a shame as thick and fevered as blood. Something he could never undo. Gabe wrenched the fan's cord from the socket, picked up the fan, and threw it down. Again and again. He almost tingled to see the wire frame crumple more and more with each crash. The plastic housing cracked, and pieces scattered across the room. He screamed at the fan and its bits running for cover under the desk and bookcase. "I hate you! You're not allowed to live no more! I'm killing you, you hear? You're dead. Dead! Go away! Go away!"

In his rage, Gabe didn't notice the fly leaving his uncle's nostril until the satisfied insect had made several loops in the air and sat preening its forelegs on the windowsill. Gabe dashed to the window, which normally sat open two inches all through the warm months and couldn't be closed again till winter shrank its wood. The fly escaped just as Gabe, with a mighty, grunting heave, slammed shut the window. He stepped back, surprised at his strength, and looked at his shaking hands. Then he knelt at his uncle's side, carefully tucking the blanket around the body and finally covering his uncle's face and head.

He closed the door to his uncle's study, then grabbed his backpack and ran into the morning, off to his second day of sixth grade.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 61 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(45)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 62 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2011

    If yiu If you dont mind crying...

    I read r
    This book


    I read this book because I was intrigued by the mystery it seemed to hold. It holds more than that.

    This is a book about: fostering, adoption, pet fostering, death and life, trust, and facing your fears.

    Gabe is used to veing shuttled from foster home to foster home when a caring caseworker is finally able to locate his uncle who agrees to take him in. Death strikes unexpectedly and Gabe finds himself alone and unsure of what to do. When this happens he also finds a curious correspondence has begun between him and a stranger, via Uncle Vernon's mailbox.

    This is a book written for juveniles but it explores some very mature themes. There is some discussion about a Vietnam vet who mistakenly fired upon a Vietnamese child who was firing on him. This tragedy haunted the vet who eventually fited upon himself due to thd guilt for which he couldn't forgive himself...
    This same veteran, though mentally unstable, reaches iut to Gabe, via the mailbox, and the two become friends from afar. Each helps the other in his own way, to face a world without Vernon.

    This story also portrays teachers, caseworkers, and law officials as being human beings with feelings and with the ability and need to reach out to others. In the end, the story line is nicely tidied up with everyone moving appropriately forward.

    I strongly caution a pre-read by parents and teachers prior to allowing or encouraging children to read this book. While it is well-written and thought-provoking, in my opinion, it should probably only be read by kids ages 10 or 12 and older. And then only if they will not be tormented by a man shooting half his head off in an attempt to expunge himself of guilt... This story has its place but it isn't for everyone. It certainly isn't something I'd have chosen to read if I'd known the subject matter more fully. If our boys choose to read it I'll be glad I've already read it.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 19, 2012

    Recommended

    I recommend this book because there is some really good detail but the one thing I could suggest was have a little bit more because in parts of the story, I got lost. I didn't know what was going on in the middle because to me there wasn't much detail.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 2, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Beautifully written.

    This should become a classic-a gentle book with a powerful story. I will look forward to more from this writer. The Vietnam War left many scars and young people of today can see some of that through the characters of this story. There is no heavy-handed moralizing, just the recognition of what was and hope for what can be.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2011

    Life's lesson

    This is a powerul story on many levels. It demonstrates how powerful the past is and how one must live eith consequences. I don't want to say much more. Just read it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 8, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    must read

    the best book i ever read kept me reading it the whole book u feel sad for the main carecter i love the book

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 31, 2011

    Iloved this book

    This book is very good

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2008

    Excellent Book

    This book captured and held my attention from the first page to the last. I wondered how a dead body could disappear and why someone would leave mysterious notes in the mailbox. The characters were well-developed and evoked a deep sense of compassion.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2007

    It was an okay book..

    This book was okay.. I never really understood the beginning until the middle of the book. Although, I have got to say, this book was pretty good. I love how the author describes the story thoroughly..

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2007

    The Mailbox

    I think The Mailbox is very well written and described. It was very exciting finding the message in the mailbox.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2014

    &# 26487

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2014

    H

    H

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 12, 2014

    Xelinia

    To: Tigressa<br>
    Where: 'call of the wild' res one<br>
    When: ASAP<br>
    Message: 'Let me go you daemonic lunatic!'<br>
    From: Xelinia<br>
    ((To Ink: Please send this. She is holding me hostage! She is a daemonic lunatic)))

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2014

    Silverstar of Jayclan

    Read it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2014

    Hi

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2014

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2014

    A message from Starclan to Jayclan

    The flock of Jays is dwindling near, many have left many have gone. If danger nears there be no more birds. Numbers too small they fall. Lost they are but not unfound. They star of silver shows the way. But helpless for now until the light shines within again. The flighting moon shall not lead astray. It helps guide the star of silver which the jay birds follow.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2014

    Annonymous starclan cat

    To: Cinderstar of Sandclan. From: an annonymous Starclan cat. Message: you must chose a deputy soon. All your cats have been loyal, but Thistlepath shows respect and he passes on skills to younger cats. I have been watching him and decided that he would be a good deputy, but the choice is yours. When: asap. Deliver to: sandy place THIRD result.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2014

    Someone

    To:harazzah from?? Messegae i eeally like you. Atachment. A rose and box of choclates. At oliver twist res one. When ASaP

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2014

    Charm

    To:kevin message: i love ya! Add on: a card that pops out and kisses him o the cheek to:'evi' res one when:twomarrow at 4:30

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2014

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 62 Customer Reviews

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