Make 50 Wild and Wacky (but Useful!) Contraptions

Overview

Making crazy devices that perform simple but useful tasks has never been more fun! Make 50 Wild and Wacky (but Useful!) Contraptions shows you how to create the most mazelike contraptions imaginable. Inside you'll discover:

The key players in the world of contraptions: Rube Goldberg, Heath Robinson, and Robert Storm Petersen

The different components that go into making a ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (32) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $1.99   
  • Used (27) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$1.99
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(2817)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
2008 Paperback New

Ships from: east moriches, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(95)

Condition: New
New Book.

Ships from: Deming, WA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(2796)

Condition: New
2007-12-26 Paperback English Language New 006143776X Ships Within 24 Hours. Tracking Number available for all USA orders. Excellent Customer Service. Upto 15 Days 100% Money ... Back Gurantee. Try Our Fast! ! ! ! Shipping With Tracking Number. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Bensalem, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$3.99
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(3189)

Condition: New
2008 Paperback New -May have label on cover and remainder mark.

Ships from: San Jose, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$6.05
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(358)

Condition: New
2008 Paperback Brand New. 100% Money Back Guarantee! Ships within 1 business day, includes tracking. Carefully packed. Serving satisfied customers since 1987.

Ships from: Darby, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Making crazy devices that perform simple but useful tasks has never been more fun! Make 50 Wild and Wacky (but Useful!) Contraptions shows you how to create the most mazelike contraptions imaginable. Inside you'll discover:

The key players in the world of contraptions: Rube Goldberg, Heath Robinson, and Robert Storm Petersen

The different components that go into making a contraption, and how to build them

The scientific, mechanical, and engineering secrets behind each of the components

How to build working models that demonstrate all of the techniques

Finally, and most importantly, Make 50 Wild and Wacky (but Useful!) Contraptions contains 50 easy-to-follow projects that show you how to make your own fiendishly complicated machines.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061437762
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 12/26/2007
  • Pages: 128
  • Product dimensions: 6.50 (w) x 8.70 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Robert Brandt runs his own design consultancy based in Brighton, England. His many commissions include engineering diagrams, three-dimensional modeling, architectural rendering, and interior design. He has also created technical illustrations for several books published in the United States, Canada, UK, and Australia.

Eric Chaline is a professional author, editor, and journalist based in London. He has numerous book and magazine credits covering a range of nonfiction subjects, including design, travel, and health and fitness.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Make 50 Wild and Wacky (but Useful!) Contraptions

Chapter One

Building a Contraption

Always remember that, broadly speaking, there are only two things that go into making a great contraption....

First, it has to be able to do something. Whether it's catching a mouse, flipping a domino, or switching off a light, your contraption should be able to fulfill some sort of meaningful (if absurdly basic) task. Second, it has to do it in style. This means unexpected twists, a sense of humor, and—above all else—far greater complexity than is necessary. After all, the point of these contraptions is that they're designed to make a simple task as complicated as possible, otherwise you may just as well go out and buy a real mousetrap, apple corer, or light switch. If you can look at your design and honestly say that it fulfills both of these criteria, then you're well on your way.

Getting it right

Before you start work, remember the three Ps: Preparation, Planning, and Prototype. Start by working your design out on paper, then rough it out in real life in sections, and only then start to make the finished device. It's always a good idea to start at the cud, with whatever it is that you want to do—popular actions include pouring cereal into a bowl, squeezing toothpaste onto a toothbrush, unscrewing the lid of a jar, turning the page of a hook, and opening a window blind.

Although it sounds back-to-front, it's important that you build from the finish backward. If, for example, a cage needs to be knocked over a "mouse," what's going to do the knocking? And what's going to cause it? Are there any otherways to spring the trap, and would any of them be more dramatic, or effective, or funny? Sometimes you suspect that some Hollywood films start life like this: with a great ending, and the hope that the rest will fall into place. You need to think the same way.

The great thing about designing contraptions is the way that you can change things around—often at the last minute—to improve the design. As long as there's enough variation in each of the individual sections, you can mix them up until you find out what makes the most exciting contraption.

Classical Mechanics

When you were in school, you might have thought that the only point to Sir Isaac Newton was to make your life miserable; alternatively, you could have thought he was the greatest genius until the man who invented the cell phone with a built-in MP3 player.

What we owe Newton, however, is nothing less than the science of classical mechanics, which neatly describes the motion of objects through space in a series of laws and mathematical equations. This is precisely the science that you'll be using when you're building and operating your own contraptions.

Sir Isaac Does Fruit

Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) is famous for his apple—the clue, so the legend has it, to the secrets of gravity. But Newton is far more significant than his experiences with ballistic fruit. In his Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of Natural 1 Philosophy) of 1687 he outlined the J three laws of motion that describe how all objects move (see box) and the law of universal gravitation. The "Principia" became the foundation of the science of classical mechanics, which in turn remains the basis for the branches of modern physics.

Moving Parts

Classical mechanics concerns itself with different types of motion at the macroscopic scale, that is, the world we can see, feel, and touch. When dealing with the infinitely small, and infinitely fast, you need quite different forms of physics, but when planning your contraptions, consider using different forms of motion to achieve more varied and interesting effects. Here are the main types of motion described by classical mechanics:

Translational: motion by which a body shifts from one point in space to another (for example, the motion of a projectile).

Rotational: motion by which a body changes orientation with respect to other bodies without changing position (for example, the motion of a spinning top).

Oscillatory: motion that continually repeats in time with a fixed period (for example, the motion of a pendulum).

Circular: motion by which a body executes a circular orbit about another fixed body (for example, the orbit of a planet around a sun).

A Matter of Words

In describing motion, classical mechanics employs mathematical equations, which are beyond the scope of this book to explain in detail. However, classical mechanics also uses a very precise vocabulary of terms that are often confused with more general terms. In this section, we'll look at the concepts of displacement, velocity, acceleration, and mass, which in common usage are often confused with distance, speed, - and weight.

Out of Place

Displacement shouldn't be confused with distance. For I example, displacement doesn't indicate how many miles a ear has traveled along a winding road, but how far it has moved relative to a fixed reference point of origin along a vector (a line of direction).

Fast and Furious

In colloquial English, speed is often used to mean velocity and acceleration, which are the two key concepts of motion. Velocity is the change in an object's position (its displacement) over time. Velocity can be either positive or negative, depending on the direction of motion. The conventional definition of speed is that it's the magnitude of velocity, and object can't have a negative speed. Acceleration is the rate of change in the velocity over time. It can arise from a change with time of the magnitude of the velocity, or of the direction of the velocity, or both.

Weighty Matters

The terms mass and weight are often confused. However, in classical mechanics their meanings are quite different. An object's mass is a measure of its inertia; that is, its resistance to deviating from uniform straight-line motion under the influence of an external force. Weight is simply the force exacted by the gravity of the earth with which the earth attracts an object.

Make 50 Wild and Wacky (but Useful!) Contraptions. Copyright © by Robert Brandt. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold. <%END%>
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction     6
Contraption Engineering
Building a Contraption     10
Classical Mechanics     12
The Building Blocks: Basic Components     14
Simple Machines     16
Wheels, Cogs, Gears, and Pulleys     18
Pendulums, Projectiles, Pivots, and Springs     20
Magnets and Other Forms of Propulsion     22
Safety and Other Considerations     24
Contraptions     1
Hands-Free Page Turner Projects     28
Hands-Free Page Turner     30
Alarm Clock Dunker     32
High Roller     33
Can-tilever     34
Sands of Time     35
Contraptions     6
Coin-Operated Toothpaste Squeezer Projects     38
Coin-Operated Toothpaste Squeezer     40
Push Me. Pull You     42
Leaps of Faith     43
The Little Squirt     44
Auto-Power     45
Contraptions     11
Solar-Powered Plant Shader Projects     48
Solar-Powered Plant Shader     50
The Vaporizer     52
The Concertina     53
The Venetian Rollerblind     54
TheMetropolis     55
Contraptions     16
Tabletop Fountain Projects     58
Tabletop Fountain     60
Water Cooler     62
A Spoonful of Sugar     63
Sugar Tower     64
Water Cannon     65
Contraptions     21
Magneto Sugar-Cube Dispenser Projects     68
Magneto Sugar-Cube Dispenser     70
Wagon Wheels     72
Spiral Slide     73
Stirred not Shaken     74
Gumball Wizard     75
Contraptions     26
High-Security Snake Releaser Projects     78
High-Security Snake Releaser     80
Liftoff     82
Sliding Doors     83
The Tumbler Lock     84
The Trawler     85
Contraptions     31
Wind-Powered Rocket Launcher Projects     88
Wind-Powered Rocket Launcher     90
Stars and Stripes     92
The Archimedes     93
Pulling Advantage     94
The Nutcracker     95
Contraptions     36
Water-Powered Bath Alarm Projects     98
Water-Powered Bath Alarm      100
The Throne Raiser     102
Magneto-Chime     103
The Ferris Wheel     104
Bubble Bath Whisker     105
Contraptions     41
Energy-Saver Light Switch Projects     108
Energy-Saver Light Switch     110
The Jet Stream     112
The Double Helix     113
The Centrifuge     114
The Helicopter Launcher     115
Contraptions     46
Gravity Domino Righter Projects     118
Gravity Domino Righter     120
Son of Domino Righter     122
Return of the Domino Righter     123
The Domino Righter Strikes Back     124
Humane Mousetrap     125
Index     126
Resources     128
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)