Make It, Break It

Make It, Break It

by Ann Turnbull, David McTaggart
     
 
What's more fun than building a sandcastle? Jumping on it and knocking it down! And the best thing to do with a clean room is to take out all your toys and mess it up all over again. And of course, after you've baked a cake, you have to eat every bit of it.

Lively pictures convey the way children really play. Here's the entire cycle of fun--from beginning to end,

Overview

What's more fun than building a sandcastle? Jumping on it and knocking it down! And the best thing to do with a clean room is to take out all your toys and mess it up all over again. And of course, after you've baked a cake, you have to eat every bit of it.

Lively pictures convey the way children really play. Here's the entire cycle of fun--from beginning to end, and starting all over again.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Its curious title notwithstanding, in only one of the three scenarios included in this book is something made and then broken. In the first pages, a brother and sister are seen at the beach, building a sandcastle that they then raze, jumping on it delightedly. Next, the two are shown picking up a bedroom: ``Now our room is clean. Let's play in it!'' Finally, the siblings help their mother make a cake. When it is done, the children sit down at a table and eat it. That is the extent of the disappointingly meager story line, which is relayed in unevenly rhymed verse (``Pick up blocks, crayons, puzzles-- / All the toys are in a muddle!''). The book's saving grace is the cheerful art provided by McTaggart, who portrays the two toddler terrorists as round-faced and gently animated. Ages 3-8. (Nov.)
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-K --A British import told in rhyme that just doesn't make it. In three separate episodes, a boy and girl make a sand castle and jump on it; clean their room and then play in it; and bake a cake and eat it. While the first activity fits the title, the other two are far-fetched connections. The illustrations--charcoal pencil and paint in soft, muted colors--are large and uncluttered and will have certain appeal to preschoolers, but the awkward rhymes (puzzles/muddle, drawer/floor, bowl/all) are jarring and uninspired. This is an attractive book, but a poorly conceived one, and the tenuous link between the action and the book's title will neither prompt discussion nor inspire the imagination.-- Trev Jones, School Library Journal

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780670833597
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
06/28/1990
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
20.00(w) x 20.00(h) x 20.00(d)
Age Range:
5 - 7 Years

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