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Make It Stick
     

Make It Stick

5.0 3
by Peter C. Brown
 

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Drawing on cognitive psychology and other fields, Make It Stick offers techniques for becoming more productive learners, and cautions against study habits and practice routines that turn out to be counterproductive. The book speaks to students, teachers, trainers, athletes, and all those interested in lifelong learning and self-improvement.

Overview

Drawing on cognitive psychology and other fields, Make It Stick offers techniques for becoming more productive learners, and cautions against study habits and practice routines that turn out to be counterproductive. The book speaks to students, teachers, trainers, athletes, and all those interested in lifelong learning and self-improvement.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
08/01/2014
Coauthors Brown (Jumping the Job Track), Henry L. Roediger (James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor of Psychology, Washington Univ. in St. Louis), and Mark A. McDaniel (psychology, director of the Ctr. for Integrative Research on Cognition, Learning, and Education, Washington Univ. in St. Louis) challenge traditional ideas about learning in this survey of cognitive studies. The authors contend that, contrary to popular belief, effective long-term learning doesn't occur through passive and repeated exposure to information. Rather, learners can best acquire knowledge by actively recalling information and connecting it to their own experience. Brown, Roediger, and McDaniel enumerate principles for improving learning, but they couch these ideas in narrative, including personal anecdotes and case studies that demonstrate each point. The authors provide suggestions to students, adult learners, and trainers who may wish to implement new techniques in instruction. All the while, they demonstrate their own principles by reiterating key concepts, building associations, and interweaving topics throughout the book. Instructors and students will find that this title not only describes cognitive principles in general terms but also provides specific examples of study techniques and methods for constructing more effective courses. VERDICT This book will appeal to high school and college students as well as educators, trainers, and anyone interested in improving memory or having a better understanding of cognitive science.—Talea Anderson, College Place, WA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780674419384
Publisher:
Harvard University Press
Publication date:
04/14/2014
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
114,946
File size:
399 KB

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Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
KenTeach More than 1 year ago
If you are a student, you should read this book. If you are a teacher, you must read this book. Authors Brown, Roediger, and McDaniel cover the latest research (and some research that's been around for decades, but for some reason hasn't become widespread educational practice) and make it understandable.  Why do students say, even thought they've studied the night before, they drew a blank on the day of the test? It's the fluency illusion. High-stakes testing is bad, sure, but frequent low-stakes quizzes that require students to pull information from memory (not just recognize it, as on a multiple-choice question) is the way to make the info stick. It's hip right now to dismiss "mere" memorization as not really learning. But you need something in your noggin to use those higher order thinking skills on. And having factual knowledge embedded in long-term memory, and easily retrievable, allows for chunking, which allows real high-powered thinking to take off. The more we learn, the more possible connections we create for further learning. It really makes sense to concentrate on improving one skill at a time, right? Work on that skill until you get it down, then move on to the next. Actually, nope. The more you know about the topic, the better you can teach it, right? Nope, again. It's the curse of knowledge. Oh, and in case you haven't been paying attention, there is evidence for learning styles, but probably not the ones you're familiar with. This book is a must have for anyone who wants to teach or learn better.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago