Make: Technology on Your Time, Volume 2

Overview

If you like to tweak, disassemble, re-create, and invent cool new uses for technology, you'll love MAKE our new quarterly publication for the inquisitive do-it-yourselfer.Every issue is packed with projects to help you make the most of all the technology in your life. Everything from home entertainment systems, to laptops, to a host of PDAs is fair game. If there's a way to hack it, tweak it, bend it, or remix it, you will find out about it in MAKE.This isn't another gadget magazine. MAKE focuses on cool things ...

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Overview

If you like to tweak, disassemble, re-create, and invent cool new uses for technology, you'll love MAKE our new quarterly publication for the inquisitive do-it-yourselfer.Every issue is packed with projects to help you make the most of all the technology in your life. Everything from home entertainment systems, to laptops, to a host of PDAs is fair game. If there's a way to hack it, tweak it, bend it, or remix it, you will find out about it in MAKE.This isn't another gadget magazine. MAKE focuses on cool things you can do to make technology work the way you want it to. The publication is inspired by our bestselling Hacks series books but with a twist. MAKE is a mook (rhymes with book). We've combined the excitement, unexpectedness, and visual appeal of a magazine with the permanence and in-depth instructiveness of a how-to book.Whether you're a geek or hacker who delights in creating new uses for technology, or a Saturday afternoon tinkerer who loves to get his hands dirty, you'll keep every issue of MAKE on your bookshelf for years to come. This second issue, available in June 2005, includes 224 pages packed with tips and tricks, including:

  • How to build an HDTV recorder and beat the Broadcast Flag
  • Podcasting 101
  • How to ransform abandoned toys into environmental avengers
  • R2-D1Y extreme bot builders at home
  • The Atari2600 PC Project
  • How to build a light-seeking robot from an old mouse
  • A Maker Profile on Natalie Jeremijenko and lots more!
Every quarter, MAKE will contain a unique set of innovative ideas and creations for a variety of new technologies, including mobile devices, in-car computers, web services, digital media, wireless and home networking, and computer hardware. Visit MAKE's web site: make.oreilly.com.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780596100780
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 6/20/2005
  • Series: Make: Technology on Your Time Series
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 6.64 (w) x 9.38 (h) x 0.36 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2005

    science fiction

    Barely 2 months ago, O'Reilly put out volume 1 of this book/magazine series. Now here is volume 2. Guess they are serious about the periodical nature. As in the first volume, there is a grab bag of unpredictable moddings (this seems to be the book's favourite term). Which may well be the enduring attraction, on an ongoing basis. You just can't tell what crazy, funky stuff will show up, as you turn the pages. Clearly, what catches your eye will vary with whomever you are. But let me describe one article. Chris Smith studied people who signed up on World of Warcraft and made a nice living by earning gold pieces and selling these on eBay. Surely, you might think, this is small scale? But he found that in 3 months, $1.3 million of these sales occurred. And the top seller made $111k. Not bad for 3 months work. Though keep in mind that in any distribution, the top person might be very unusual. Well, Smith also points out that in February 2005, the top 5 sellers made an average of $20k each. Not so long ago (pre-Web), this would have been a pure science fiction scenario. Set in the far future. Appropriately, we are indeed in the 21st century.

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