Make Way for Dyamonde Daniel

Make Way for Dyamonde Daniel

4.6 3
by Nikki Grimes, R. Gregory Christie
     
 

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Dyamonde Daniel may be new in town, but that doesn't stop her from making a place for herself in a jiffy. With her can-do attitude and awesome brain power she takes the whole neighborhood by storm. The only thing puzzling her is the other new kid in her class. He's grouchy - but Dyamonde's determined to get to the bottom of his attitude and make a friend.See more details below

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Overview

Dyamonde Daniel may be new in town, but that doesn't stop her from making a place for herself in a jiffy. With her can-do attitude and awesome brain power she takes the whole neighborhood by storm. The only thing puzzling her is the other new kid in her class. He's grouchy - but Dyamonde's determined to get to the bottom of his attitude and make a friend.

Editorial Reviews

Julie Just
Dyamonde, a third grader, has "wild-crazy hair," is "skinnier than half a toothpick" and is more than equal to the challenge of entering the crowded field of confident grade school heroines.
—The New York Times
Children's Literature - Maggie Chase
Dyamonde Daniel is a lively, confidant, somewhat forward third grader who, despite her best intentions to think positively, pines for her best friend, the old neighborhood, and her parents as a married couple (without all the fighting of course). Dyamonde is also very smart, as the author reminds us again and again, and as such is not content to let problems go unfixed. So when a new, very grumpy boy named Free is welcomed into the class, Dyamonde cannot help but wonder why he is so surly to everyone and outright mean to younger children. When she confronts him with a demanding "What is your problem?" Free is taken aback by her assertive personality but cannot resist nor escape her persistence. Eventually, they discover the many things they have in common and begin to explore their urban setting together. Grimes' writing is accessible, appropriately descriptive, and clearly conveys Dyamonde's strong voice and character. Dyamonde's love of math provides a recurring motif throughout the book, as in this example after her parents divorced, when she "hated math because all she could see was subtraction. Mom's voice minus Dad's. Two for breakfast instead of three. Monday night TV minus the football." Many scenes would make great readers' theater interpretations. With large print, only seventy-two pages, and expressive line drawings, this will serve as a great transition chapter book for second and fourth graders. Reviewer: Maggie Chase
School Library Journal
Gr 2-3–“What’s the matter with the new boy?” wonders third grader Dyamonde Daniel. Free always looks angry and never talks in class, only communicating in grunts. Dyamonde knows what it feels like to be new: her parents’ divorce caused her to relocate from Brooklyn to Washington Heights. Yet her friendly overtures are rebuffed each time. When Free scares one of the little kids in the lunchroom, Dyamonde has had enough and confronts him about his grouchy behavior. It turns out that the classmates have much in common, including their unusual names and a longing for their old schools and friends. Dyamonde, smart, assertive, wild-haired, and “skinnier than half a toothpick,” is a memorable main character, though she sometimes sounds too mature for her years. Yet her actions and feelings ring true. Christie’s illustrations flesh out the characters, and along with patterned page borders, contribute child appeal. This is a promising start to a new series of transitional chapter books; suggest it to readers who enjoyed Karen English’s Nikki & Deja (Clarion, 2008), another early chapter book about the ups and downs of friendship between two African-American students.–Jackie Partch, Multnomah County Library, Portland, OR
Kirkus Reviews
Third grader Dyamonde Daniel, transplanted from Brooklyn to Washington Heights because of her parents' divorce, is looking for a best friend. She is smart in school, especially when it comes to numbers, and sometimes her bravado makes her seem cocky. Deep down, Dyamonde is like most other kids: She wants a friend and she wants to belong. But as her new friend Free, also newly relocated because of family issues, says, "Wow! You're amazing . . . .You really don't care what people think." He hides his fondness for reading from the other children and is grouchy and belligerent to the little kids until Dyamonde calls him on his attitude, cementing their friendship. City youngsters will welcome a story set in their world-the world of small businesses, nosy old folks, small apartments and people from many cultures, and new readers will welcome the familiar situations, large font and ample white space. Gregory's familiar black-and-white sketches add a hip, urban feel to the tale. Here's hoping this series kick-off leads to many more stories about best friends Dyamonde and Free. (Fiction. 7-10)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780142415559
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
03/04/2010
Pages:
112
Sales rank:
179,367
Product dimensions:
7.92(w) x 5.20(h) x 0.30(d)
Lexile:
620L (what's this?)
Age Range:
7 - 9 Years

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