Making a Friend

Overview

Clean, cold, white snow! Snow for sledding. Snow for catching on your tongue. Snow for making a SNOWMAN! Is there anything as wonderful as SNOW? Is there any better friend than a SNOWMAN? Snow isn?t forever, though. The wind shifts, the weather warms and snow melts into spring. The Snowman has become something else?the fog, the rain. But, how can this boy forget his good friend? He doesn?t?and he doesn?t have to.

Bestselling author, Alison McGhee reminds us all that nothing that...

See more details below
Hardcover
$15.39
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$16.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (17) from $1.99   
  • New (9) from $9.08   
  • Used (8) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Clean, cold, white snow! Snow for sledding. Snow for catching on your tongue. Snow for making a SNOWMAN! Is there anything as wonderful as SNOW? Is there any better friend than a SNOWMAN? Snow isn’t forever, though. The wind shifts, the weather warms and snow melts into spring. The Snowman has become something else—the fog, the rain. But, how can this boy forget his good friend? He doesn’t…and he doesn’t have to.

Bestselling author, Alison McGhee reminds us all that nothing that has been cared for can ever disappear for good, for, “What you love will always be with you.” And, this tender story about the power of friendship will stay with readers long after they turn the last page.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
McGhee takes up an ethereal subject: longing for absent loved ones. A boy builds—and happily befriends—a snowman, which later melts in a spring thaw. “Where did you go?” the boy wonders. “Look,” writes McGhee (Someday), as the seasons shift and the boy pours a bucket of water into a pond. “He is in the falling water, and the rain upon the ocean.” Rosenthal’s (I Must Have Bobo!) boxy houses and rural scenes speak of simpler times, and the soft, sepia outlines of his pencil drawings look like old lithographs. Visual hints of the snowman’s lingering presence—ripples in the pond echo his charcoal facial features—underscore McGhee’s message. (And just in case readers miss it, it’s also spelled out in a refrain, “What you love will always be with you.”) The success of the book is in the gentle rhythm created by McGhee’s telegraphic text and Rosenthal’s spot illustrations, and in its evocation of the long waits of childhood, so difficult for the young to endure. All ages. (Oct.)
From the Publisher
Making a Friend
Alison McGhee, illus. by Marc Rosenthal. S&S/Atheneum, $16.99 (40p) ISBN 978-1-4169-8998-1

McGhee takes up an ethereal subject: longing for absent loved ones. A boy builds—and happily befriends—a snowman, which later melts in a spring thaw. “Where did you go?” the boy wonders. “Look,” writes McGhee (Someday), as the seasons shift and the boy pours a bucket of water into a pond. “He is in the falling water, and the rain upon the ocean.” Rosenthal’s (I Must Have Bobo!) boxy houses and rural scenes speak of simpler times, and the soft, sepia outlines of his pencil drawings look like old lithographs. Visual hints of the snowman’s lingering presence—ripples in the pond echo his charcoal facial features—underscore McGhee’s message. (And just in case readers miss it, it’s also spelled out in a refrain, “What you love will always be with you.”) The success of the book is in the gentle rhythm created by McGhee’s telegraphic text and Rosenthal’s spot illustrations, and in its evocation of the long waits of childhood, so difficult for the young to endure. All ages.

Publishers Weekly, September 5, 2011

Making a Friend.
McGhee, Alison (Author) , Rosenthal, Marc (Illustrator)
Oct 2011. 40 p. Atheneum, hardcover, $16.99. (9781416989981).

It is a simple story, told many times over: a child builds a snowman, and then the snowman melts.
McGhee’s take stars a boy with a red baseball cap and the phrase, “What you love will always be with
you.” To illustrate continuity, the narrator’s response to the boy’s question, “Where did he go?” points to
the following seasons’ precipitation and the presence of water in the child’s world. In this way, the
snowman is there in the rain, fog, and frost. When a new season arrives and it snows again, the boy
lovingly builds a new snowman just like the one that melted, as if it had never left. Rosenthal’s spare
drawings complement the tenor of the simple text. Childlike, the illustrations rely on a limited palate.
Clues the snowman is still present in the elements show up in suggestions of the snowman’s face and body in raindrops, puddles, and clouds. It is extremely subtle, but when observant children notice it, they will feel justly rewarded.

BOOKLIST, October 1, 2011

MCGHEE, Alison. Making a Friend.
In minimal but evocative text, McGhee introduces a small boy who builds a snowman and becomes attached to his creation. When it inevitably melts in the spring, the boy wonders, “Where did he go?” He finds his snowman almost everywhere he turns–in the rain on the ocean, the fog in the hollow, the frost on the window, etc., and realizes, “What you love will always be with you.” When winter returns, he builds another snowman and again enjoys the companionship. Similar in tone to Mo Willems’s City Dog, Country Frog (Hyperion, 2010), this gentle story offers the same opportunity to discuss the cycle of love, loss, and emotional renewal. The digitally manipulated pencil illustrations have a retro look and are reminiscent of the work of Louis Slobodkin. There is a lot of white space, particularly on the pages where only the boy and the snowman are depicted, giving the impression that they are in their own special private world. A simple but deeply nuanced story that should resonate with children.
SLJ, October 2011

With the sparest text and softest watercolors, McGhee and Rosenthal lovingly evoke the pleasures of the season’s first snow. A red-capped boy makes a snowman, giving him pebbly eyes, a carrot nose, and finally, his own red hat to wear. When the snow melts, the snowman doesn’t really disappear: he is in the falling water, the rain on the ocean and the fog. He is always with the boy and will always come back in this tender paean to cold weather and enduring friendship.

—New York Times Book Review (12/28)

Children's Literature - Annie Laura Smith
Snow is a part of winter in many areas and building a snowman is an important activity during this season. The author and illustrator take a winter scene with a boy building and befriending a snowman, and depict the power of love and friendship. The message: "What you love will always be with you." shines through the brief text and captivating drawings. Although wind and warmer weather turn the carefully crafted snowman into frost on the window, fog, and rain as spring approaches, the basic message of love is always there. Young readers will learn that nothing you really care for will ever disappear for good. The story is in part a tutorial about building a snowman. After forming the snow into the body of a snowman, illustrations and text show that the builder will need eyes, a nose, a mouth, arms, and a hat to finish off the snowman. The story also presents the change in the seasons from fall to spring with relevant illustrations. Reviewer: Annie Laura Smith
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—In minimal but evocative text, McGhee introduces a small boy who builds a snowman and becomes attached to his creation. When it inevitably melts in the spring, the boy wonders, "Where did he go?" He finds his snowman almost everywhere he turns—in the rain on the ocean, the fog in the hollow, the frost on the window, etc., and realizes, "What you love will always be with you." When winter returns, he builds another snowman and again enjoys the companionship. Similar in tone to Mo Willems's City Dog, Country Frog (Hyperion, 2010), this gentle story offers the same opportunity to discuss the cycle of love, loss, and emotional renewal. The digitally manipulated pencil illustrations have a retro look and are reminiscent of the work of Louis Slobodkin. There is a lot of white space, particularly on the pages where only the boy and the snowman are depicted, giving the impression that they are in their own special private world. A simple but deeply nuanced story that should resonate with children.—Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ
Kirkus Reviews
The early-children's-book feel of Rosenthal's pencil-and-digital illustrations is what will first strike readers of McGhee's rather morose celebration of the forever nature of friendship. A young boy looks forward to winter's snowy fun. When it finally arrives, he crafts the perfect snowman friend, complete with nose, mouth, eyes, arms and the bright-red ball cap taken from his own head. He labels him, "My Snowman." But while it is obvious that the boy spends some time admiring the snowman, the wordless pages devoted to their relationship fail to develop it fully, and readers may be left wondering why he is so sad when spring melts his friend. Where is he? Intuiting concepts beyond his apparent years, the boy finds his friend in the falling water and rain, in the fog and frost (although it is never explained to young readers how this is scientifically so), proving that McGhee's unsubtly stated message is true: "What you love will always be with you." And when the seasons come full circle, the two are reacquainted. Rosenthal's illustrations are blotches of color on a stark white background, echoing the wintry setting and the boy's sorrow, as well as the sparseness of the slow-paced text. This retro salute to friendship simply tries to be too much to be successful--it does not hold a candle to McGhee's prior works such as Someday or Little Boy, both illustrated by Peter H. Reynolds (2007, 2008) (Picture book. 4-6)
Pamela Paul
…[a] tender paean to cold weather and enduring friendship.
—The New York Times Book Review
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781416989981
  • Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date: 10/4/2011
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 639,382
  • Age range: 2 - 5 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.20 (w) x 9.70 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Alison McGhee is the New York Times bestselling author of Someday, Little Boy, So Many Days, Bye-Bye Crib, Always, A Very Brave Witch, and Bink and Gollie. Her other children’s books include All Rivers Flow to the Sea, Countdown to Kindergarten, and Snap. Alison is also an award-winning novelist of the adult novels Was It Beautiful, Rainlight; and Shadowbaby, which was a Today show book club selection. She lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and you can visit her at AlisonMcGhee.com.

Marc Rosenthal is the illustrator of many books for children, including I Must Have Bobo, I’ll Save You Bobo, and Bobo the Sailor Man, all by Eileen Rosenthal; The Straight Line Wonder by Mem Fox; and Phooey, which he wrote. Marc’s illustrations can be seen regularly in The New Yorker, Time, Forbes, Fortune, The Atlantic Monthly, The New York Times, Boston Globe, The Washington Post, and others. Visit him online at Marc-Rosenthal.com.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)