Making a Medical Living: Doctors and Patients in the English Market for Medicine, 1720-1911 / Edition 1

Making a Medical Living: Doctors and Patients in the English Market for Medicine, 1720-1911 / Edition 1

by Anne Digby
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0521524512

ISBN-13: 9780521524513

Pub. Date: 06/30/2002

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Making a Medical Market begins with the first voluntary hospital in 1720 and ends in 1911 with national health insurance. It looks at different forms of practice—public appointments in hospitals, office under state welfare systems, and private practice. From the 1750s medicine became more commercialized. Doctors were successful in raising demand for their own

Overview

Making a Medical Market begins with the first voluntary hospital in 1720 and ends in 1911 with national health insurance. It looks at different forms of practice—public appointments in hospitals, office under state welfare systems, and private practice. From the 1750s medicine became more commercialized. Doctors were successful in raising demand for their own services but were unsuccessful in restricting competition. Many medical practitioners struggled to make a living by seeing many patients at low fees, so that "five minutes for the patient" is not a new feature of health care.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521524513
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
06/30/2002
Series:
Cambridge Studies in Population, Economy and Society in Past Time Series, #24
Edition description:
First Paperback Edition
Pages:
372
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 0.83(d)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

Introduction; Part I. The Professional Structure of Practice: 1. Medical practitioners; 2. The context of practice; 3. Medical encounters; Part II. The Economic Dimensions of Practice: 4. The creation of surgical general practice; 5. The GP and the goal of prosperity; 6. Physicians; Part III. Patients and Doctors: 7. Medicalisation and affluent patients; 8. Office, altruism and poor patients; 9. Expanding practice with women and child patients; Part IV. Synthesis: Reflections.

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