Making Ireland Roman: Irish Neo-Latin Writers and the Republic of Letters

Overview

This collection of articles by leading scholars focuses on Irish writing in Latin in the Renaissance and aims to rewrite Irish cultural history through recovery and analysis of Latin sources. This book renders accessible for the first time the vastly important Irish contribution to the counter-reformation, to European Renaissance and baroque literature in Latin and to the intellectual culture of European Latinity. The ethnic, cultural and religious divisions within Ireland ...
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Overview

This collection of articles by leading scholars focuses on Irish writing in Latin in the Renaissance and aims to rewrite Irish cultural history through recovery and analysis of Latin sources. This book renders accessible for the first time the vastly important Irish contribution to the counter-reformation, to European Renaissance and baroque literature in Latin and to the intellectual culture of European Latinity. The ethnic, cultural and religious divisions within Ireland produced a divided Latin writing and reading community.

The Latin language became the medium in which the Catholic Church operated. When Christianity took root in Ireland so too did Latin. It became one of the principal languages of Ireland for over a thousand years resulting in over one thousand books being published by Irish authors. In order to convey the idiosyncrasies of Gaelic culture in the language of European scholarship to an international audience, Irish authors had to engage in a process of cultural translation. Many were Catholic exiles who attempted to promote an alternative to the English colonial narrative being written by domestic scholars. Some writers felt compelled to defend their country’s reputation as a result of defamatory comments made by other writers.

Articles include a detailed reconstruction of a feud with Scottish historians about the identity of medieval “Scotia” as they claimed that it referred to Scotland rather than Ireland. Other articles include a contextual study of the political epic poem “Ormonius”, an examination of the major Latinist Richard Stanihurst and an evaluation of the literature of Catholic exile.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"This collection of essays is an important contribution to Neo-Latin studies, and has a full scholary apparatus of notes and references."

"This important book uncovers an Ireland of confident aristocrats and intellectuals, effective combatants in one or another war of words, not starving and dispossed peasants. For that reason alone, it would be a valuable contribution to the history of Ireland in the context of its immediate neighbors, but it also sheds a flood of light on Ireland's interrelations with other European countries."

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781859184530
  • Publisher: Cork University Press
  • Publication date: 11/28/2009
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Jason Harris is Lecturer in Early Modern History in University College Cork and Director of the Centre for Neo-Latin Studies in Cork.

Keith Sidwell is Adjunct Professor, Department of Greek and Roman Studies, University of Calgary, and the founder of the Centre for Neo-Latin Studies in Cork.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Introduction: Ireland and Romanitas—Jason Harris and Keith Sidwell
1) Some Reflexes of Latin Learning and of the Renaissance in Ireland c. 1450-c. 1600—Diarmaid Ó Cathain
2) Derricke and Stanihurst: A Dialogue—John Barry
3) The Richard Stanihurst-Justus Lipsius Friendship: Scholarship and Religion Under Spanish Hapsburg Patronage in the Late Sixteenth Century—Colm Lennon
4) ‘The Tipperary Hero’: Dermot O’Meara’s Ormonius (1615)—Keith Sidwell and David Edwards
5) ‘Making Ireland Spanish’: The Political Writings of Philip O’Sullican Beare—Hiram Morgan
6) The Scotic Debate: Philip O’Sullivan Beare and His Tenebriomastix--David Caulfield
7) A Case Study in Rhetorical Composition: Stephen White’s Two Apologiae for Ireland—Jason Harris
8) Latin Invective Verse in the Commentarius Rinuccinianus--Gráinne McLaughlin
9) Ussher and the Collection of Manuscripts in Early Modern Europe—Elizabethanne Boran
Notes and References
Index
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