Making Monsters: False Memories, Psychotherapy, And Sexual Hysteria, Updated with a new final chapter

Making Monsters: False Memories, Psychotherapy, And Sexual Hysteria, Updated with a new final chapter

by Richard Ofshe, Ethan Watters
     
 

In the last decade, reports of incest have exploded into the national consciousness. Magazines, talk shows, and mass market paperbacks have taken on the subject as many Americans, primarily women, have come forward with graphic memories of childhood abuse. Making Monsters examines the methods of therapists who treat patients for depression by working to

Overview


In the last decade, reports of incest have exploded into the national consciousness. Magazines, talk shows, and mass market paperbacks have taken on the subject as many Americans, primarily women, have come forward with graphic memories of childhood abuse. Making Monsters examines the methods of therapists who treat patients for depression by working to draw out memories or, with the use of hypnosis, to encourage fantasies of childhood abuse the patients are told they have repressed. Since this therapy may leave the patient more depressed and alienated than before, questions are appropriately raised here about the ethics and efficacy of such treatment.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This is the most thoroughgoing and powerful critique to date of the use of recovered memories in psychotherapy. Many retrieved memories of childhood sexual abuse, the authors argue, are fabrications generated in a coercive, highly charged atmosphere using questionable therapeutic techniques such as hypnosis, dream analysis, artwork and the constant revisiting and rewriting of vague early memories. Ofshe, a social psychology professor at UC Berkeley and a Pulitzer-winning reporter, and freelance writer Watters extend their analysis to include alleged sufferers of multiple-personality disorder and people who claim to have been abused or tortured by satanic cults that engage in sacrificial murder and rape. The authors name names, attacking therapists, experts and writers, and they cover such well-publicized cases involving recovered memories as the 1990 San Francisco murder trial that convicted George Franklin on the basis of his daughter Eileen Lipsker's accusation that he had killed her childhood friend Susan Nasson 20 years earlier. This report is certain to escalate a heated public debate. (Oct.)
Booknews
Ofshe (social psychology, UC Berkeley) and Watters demonstrate that memories recovered from memory therapy can be fabricated through questionable techniques such as hypnosis. The authors show how the mental health establishment has added to the confusion, trace the problem back to its source, Sigmund Freud, and discuss the creation of pseudomemories, multiple personality disorder, and recent research in the field. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780520205833
Publisher:
University of California Press
Publication date:
09/24/1996
Pages:
352
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.88(d)

Meet the Author


Richard Ofshe, a Professor of Social Psychology at the University of California at Berkeley, is one of the nation's foremost authorities on tactics of coercion and a co-recipient of the 1979 Pulitzer Prize for public service reporting. Ethan Watters, a freelance journalist, published one of the first articles on pseudo-memory in the popular press.

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