Making Movies with Final Cut Express: A Self-Paced Guide to Editing Digital Video

Overview

You don't have to go to film school to learn from the master: In Making Movies with Final Cut Express, Hollywood veteran Michael Rubin comes to you! In these pages, he provides everything you need to know to start producing entertaining and informative videos with Apple's new Final Cut Express. Offering loads of illustrations and a friendly writing style, this handy book makes it easy for even complete novices to learn digital video editing. After covering the basics of working with Final Cut Express--using the ...
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Overview

You don't have to go to film school to learn from the master: In Making Movies with Final Cut Express, Hollywood veteran Michael Rubin comes to you! In these pages, he provides everything you need to know to start producing entertaining and informative videos with Apple's new Final Cut Express. Offering loads of illustrations and a friendly writing style, this handy book makes it easy for even complete novices to learn digital video editing. After covering the basics of working with Final Cut Express--using the timeline, adjusting shots, inserting audio tracks, adding text and titles, and more--Rubin lets you hone your skills by editing and assembling the video clips included on the companion DVD. By the time you complete this book, you'll be ready to create your own effective video projects and improve the footage you've captured in the past.
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Editorial Reviews

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The Barnes & Noble Review
Millions of people are getting involved with digital video. Most of them fall into one of two categories. The first group will try it and just decide it’s too much trouble. The second group will catch the bug -- big-time. They’ll want to do really great work -- whether they’re producing last winter’s family gathering or the next Blair Witch Project. Chances are, they’ll get frustrated with the entry-level software they’ve been using. Many of them will go out and buy Apple’s new Final Cut Express, which offers truly amazing power and value for the price. Then, they’ll scratch their heads: Where to begin?

We suggest they start with Making Movies with Final Cut Express by Michael Rubin.

Nobody has more experience explaining digital video editing and production to newcomers. Rubin’s Beginner's Final Cut Pro was a breakthrough in beginner’s books on the “professional” version of Final Cut. He helped pioneer nonlinear editing techniques at LucasFilm back in the '80s and wrote the field’s classic introduction, Nonlinear: A Field Guide to Digital Video and Film. (Along the way, he found time to assist Academy Award–winning editor Gabriella Cristiani in her nonlinear post-production of Bernardo Bertolucci's The Sheltering Sky, serve as principal nonlinear editor on Paul McCartney’s concert film Get Back, and work on Lonesome Dove.)

Think of Making Movies with Final Cut Express as “Film School in a Book.” Rubin isn’t interested in simply teaching you how to point and click; he wants to teach you to make great videos. Not a lot of abstract theory here: Rubin teaches hands on. (That’s what that DVD full of raw footage is for.)

Rubin starts by helping you make your Mac a bit more “video friendly,” and giving you a personal tour that makes all of FCE’s knobs, boxes, and numbers a lot less intimidating. If you’re moving from iMovie, he also provides a “Rosetta Stone” comparing the terminology of the two programs.

Before you start monkeying with the video controls, Rubin shows you some easy, professional techniques for precisely controlling where you stop and cut video -- both mouse- and keyboard-oriented approaches. (There’s even a find-the-right-frame “scavenger hunt” to get you comfy.)

Then, it’s on to basic editing. Rubin does a nice job of helping you ignore the complex tools you don’t need yet, so you can get results with the ones you do need. You’ll get comfortable with your footage (there’s a nice “Shot Vocabulary Cheat Sheet” to remind you what cutaway and establishing shots look like). Next, you’ll walk through making basic inserts, trims, roll edits, swap edits, and so forth -- meat-and-potatoes stuff you’ll use constantly.

Rubin presents a full chapter on working with multiple tracks: music and sound mixes; titles and text; picture tracks; transition effects; even keyframes and compositing. Maybe handiest of all: the chapter on “being your own assistant.” (Unless you have a paid staff -- yeah, right -- who’s gonna create the log sheets, handle the timecoding, and so forth? You.

If you’re ready to get serious about digital video, you’re ready for this software -- and this book. Bill Camarda

Bill Camarda is a consultant, writer, and web/multimedia content developer. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2000 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks for Dummies, Second Edition.

Library Journal
As digital video becomes evermore popular and accessible to the hobbyist and small-business user, editing tools such as this Mac-only "lite" version of Final Cut Pro have proliferated. For beginning users and all libraries, the screenshot-heavy Making Movies assumes no previous video-editing knowledge. The DVD includes tutorial footage; the text walks users through various ways of editing that footage. Topics range from basic editing to adding audio to tips for managing video projects. For beginning to intermediate users, Techniques provides step-by-step directions on creating fun and interesting effects. Notes, tips, and copious screenshots help beginners achieve effects from the simple (e.g., adjusting brightness and contrast) to the interesting (e.g., adding crawling text). The CD includes project files, sample video clips, a PDF version of the text, and trial software. Appropriate for all libraries, to supplement more basic how-to guides. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780321197771
  • Publisher: Peachpit Press
  • Publication date: 6/25/2003
  • Edition description: Second Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 318
  • Product dimensions: 7.54 (w) x 9.32 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
Ch. 1 First Things First 1
A Place to Work 2
A Quick Tour Through the Final Cut Interface 11
Preparing for the Tutorials 24
Playtime: Mastering the Video Controls 28
Ch. 2 Basic Editing 49
Familiarize Yourself with the Scene 50
Editing Your First Shots 59
Understanding Inserts 61
Timeline Features 73
Adjusting Your Shots 78
Creating Multiple Versions 95
Review of Final Cut Express Editing Tools 97
Ch. 3 Less Basic Editing 101
Track Controls 102
The Overlap 107
The Insert 115
Adjusting Your One-Track Shots 128
Moving Shots Around 136
Life In and Out of Sync 141
Ch. 4 Getting Fancy with More Tracks 149
Adding More Tracks 150
Sound 151
Titles and Text 165
Basic Transition Effects 184
Keyframes and Composting 196
Filter Effects 200
Basic Speed Effects 204
Putting It All Together: The Title Sequence 208
Adjusting the Final Cut Interface 210
Ch. 5 Becoming Your Own Assistant 217
Managing Video Projects 218
Input: Capturing Video 234
Output: Finishing Up 252
Ch. 6 Your Video Projects 273
What's in Your Camera Now? 274
New Projects 279
You Made It! 299
Appendix 301
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