The Making of the Slave Class

The Making of the Slave Class

5.0 2
by Jerry Carrier
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

You can only be a king if you have many peasants. You can only have the super-rich if you have many who are poor. And this is the basis for class.
Not that long ago the head of the Mormon Church summarized what many American's believe or at least subconsciously accept when he said, "There is a reason why one man is born white rich and with many blessings and

Overview

You can only be a king if you have many peasants. You can only have the super-rich if you have many who are poor. And this is the basis for class.
Not that long ago the head of the Mormon Church summarized what many American's believe or at least subconsciously accept when he said, "There is a reason why one man is born white rich and with many blessings and another is born black with very few, God has determined each man's proper reward."
And while he was widely and deservedly criticized for his remarks, it wasn't because a majority does not believe his views, but rather that they deemed him politically incorrect for brining race into the question and for saying aloud what many think quietly and keep to themselves.
Class is America's forbidden thought. Class and culture rigidly control who we are, who we associate with, and how much money we can earn. American class culture determines who will prosper and who will fail. 'The Making of the Slave Class' is a book about this culture and the debilitating consequences that make the American slave class.
This is a personal story of the author's working class and early life in poverty combined with very readable treatment of the American class system written for a general audience. This book is the first historical and cultural analysis of the American class system and the poverty it creates.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780875867687
Publisher:
Algora Publishing
Publication date:
03/28/2010
Pages:
260
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Jerry Carrier grew up in poverty and as a child moved from place to place, from a public housing project to an abandoned Navy hospital, 'en el barrio,' a rented farmhouse, and a rural wood-heated cabin. In twelve years he attended six elementary schools, a middle school, and two high schools before graduating. He went to work at the age of twelve as a busboy and dishwasher in a railroad depot. He worked various full time jobs through junior high, high school and college supporting his family. He is the first in his family to graduate from high school and college.
Carrier is a nationally recognized educator in class, poverty, affordable housing and economic development. He has taught and developed curriculum for universities, state and local governments, schools, and non profits. He is adjunct faculty at the National Graduate School for Community Economic Development at Southern New Hampshire University and for the National Neighborworks Training Institutes. He has worked for over thirty years in community economic development and public administration as an executive director of several nonprofits, a community action agency, a housing authority, and in local governments as an economic development director and planner, and has also been a city manager of several cities. He has also been on the Boards of Director of five nonprofits and a school.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Making of the Slave Class 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I never thought much about how class religion and culture drive our economic system. Agree with him or not, this is thought provoking.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago