Making Sense Out of Suffering

( 3 )

Overview

This book is for anyone who has ever wept and wondered, "Why?" Peter Kreeft observes that our world is full of billions of normal lives that have been touched by apparently pointless and random suffering. This account of a real and honest personal quest is both engaging and convincing. Written from a deep well of wisdom derived from experience and careful observation, Making Sense Out of Suffering is a book for empty hearts, not full ones. Read it if you are hungry for insight into the mystery of suffering. A ...
See more details below
Paperback
$11.30
BN.com price
(Save 19%)$13.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (31) from $1.99   
  • New (9) from $8.88   
  • Used (22) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

This book is for anyone who has ever wept and wondered, "Why?" Peter Kreeft observes that our world is full of billions of normal lives that have been touched by apparently pointless and random suffering. This account of a real and honest personal quest is both engaging and convincing. Written from a deep well of wisdom derived from experience and careful observation, Making Sense Out of Suffering is a book for empty hearts, not full ones. Read it if you are hungry for insight into the mystery of suffering. A Servant Book.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780892832194
  • Publisher: Franciscan Media
  • Publication date: 7/28/1986
  • Pages: 184
  • Sales rank: 331,724
  • Product dimensions: 5.19 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Peter Kreeft, professor of philosophy at Boston College, is the author of such well-received books as Between Heaven and Hell; The Unaborted Socrates; Yes or No?: Straight Answers to Tough Questions About Chrisitanity; Heaven: The Heart's Deepest Longing; and Prayer: The Great Conversation
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2008

    well worth the price

    Kreeft is genius in his ability to simplify areas of human wonder. Those who are not familiar with Kreeft's work should do some homework on who he is, and what he does...this may shed some light on how he approaches to answer questions with the use of dialogue and supurb logic. Readers who either can't or won't appreciate sound logic as a foundation for exploring debate through both or multiples sides of an issue risk prejudging his works as overly spiritual, or applicable only in philosophy classrooms. In this title, Kreeft helps to point out the perspective of suffering, how suffering can be justified, if suffering really occurs...or on what level does it occur within the individual. He also helps to point out the purpose of suffering, how it can help us, and its position to its opposite 'pleasure'. Granted this may not be the best title to read as your first book from Peter Kreeft. There are many other quicker reads that give a softer introduction to his method of writing. Still, his books deliver what they promiss.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2005

    More philosophical than consoling.

    I was greatly disappointed by this book. Sufffering from a chronic illness I wanted a Christian book to really help me with it. Instead the author goes into a philosophical debate against paganism, relativism, Satanism (how this came up, beats me!) and presumes that the reader has read a book called 'When Bad Things Happen to Good People'. It seemed to me that the author had an ax to grind when it came to this other book and his presumption that the reader has also read this book seems like the author thinks that every one who suffers has read it. Basically if you want a meaning to your suffering try praying the psalms or reading something else if you are more of a philosopher, this book me be up your alley.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 20, 2013

    Very highly recommend

    This is the best book I've ever read that deals with suffering. Accurate with the Bible and helpful. Highly recommend it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)