Making Technology Masculine

Overview


To say that technology is male comes as no surprise, but the claim that its history is a short one strikes a new note. Making Technology Masculine: Men, Women, and Modern Machines in America, 1870-1945 maps the historical process through which men laid claims to technology as their exclusive terrain. It also explores how women contested this ascendancy of the male discourse and engineered alternative plots. From the moral gymnasium of the shop floor to the staging grounds of World's Fairs, engineers, inventors, ...
See more details below
Paperback (ILLUSTRATE)
$34.96
BN.com price
(Save 3%)$36.25 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (8) from $35.77   
  • New (5) from $35.77   
  • Used (3) from $38.74   
Sending request ...

Overview


To say that technology is male comes as no surprise, but the claim that its history is a short one strikes a new note. Making Technology Masculine: Men, Women, and Modern Machines in America, 1870-1945 maps the historical process through which men laid claims to technology as their exclusive terrain. It also explores how women contested this ascendancy of the male discourse and engineered alternative plots. From the moral gymnasium of the shop floor to the staging grounds of World's Fairs, engineers, inventors, social scientists, activists, and novelists emplotted and questioned technology as our modern male myth. Oldenziel recounts the history of technology - both as intellectual construct and material practice - by analyzing these struggles. Drawing on a broad range of sources, she explains why male machines rather than female fabrics have become the modern markers of technology. She shows how technology developed as a narrative production of modern manliness, allowing women little room for negotiation
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9789053563816
  • Publisher: Amsterdam University Press
  • Publication date: 9/28/2004
  • Edition description: ILLUSTRATE
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 935,598
  • Product dimensions: 6.68 (w) x 9.32 (h) x 0.61 (d)

Table of Contents


Acknowledgements
Introduction
 
1.  Unsettled Discourses
From the Useful Arts to Applied Science
Female Fabrics versus Manly Machines
Veblen Amalgamating, Engineers, Machines, and Technology
Technology-as-Keyword on Display
 
2.  From Elite Profession to Mass Occupation
'Shopfloor Culture' and the Workplace as Moral Gymnasium
'School Culture' and the Domestication of Outsiders
Revitalizing Male Authority Through Professionalization
Broken Paternal Promises of Promotion
Making Technology a Mask for Disunity
 
3.  Bargaining for the Fraternity
Carving Out a Space Between Labor and Capital
Writing a World Without Workers
Building the Engineering Family Without Women
Appropriating the Worker's Body
(Re)Making the History of Engineering
 
4.  (De)Constructing Male Professional Bridges
Scribbling Men Design Engineers
Kipling and Martha's Manliness
Women Engineer Alternative Plots
Burning Professional Bridges
Modernist Moment: Machines, Sex, and War
 
5.  Women Reweaving Borrowed Identities
Surrogate Sons and the Inside Job
School Culture and the Strategy of Over-Qualification
Foot Soldiers of Bureaucracy
Facing Male Professionalism
Divide and Conquer
Organizing at Last
"Woman Power" and Daughters of Martha: Failed Allegories
 
Epilogue
Gender, Technology, and Man the Maker
 
Notes
 
Bibliography
Primary
Secondary
 
Index
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2000

    Pioneering study

    This is a pioneering cultural study of the relations between gender and technology. Why do we think of engineers as steroteypically male and of technology as part of the masculine realm? Ruth Oldenziel has cleverly utilized many kinds of sources--including an astonishing amount of information about American women engineers--and has applied insights from cultural and feminist studies in order to create this fascinating answer to those two questions.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)