Making the Foreign Serve China ( Asia/ Pacific/ Perspectives/ Series): Managing Foreigners in the People's Republic

Overview

This book provides the first detailed analysis of a crucial and distinctive element of Chinese foreign policy. Anne-Marie Brady follows the development of the Chinese Communist Party's 'foreign affairs' system since 1921, focusing on waishi, the external policies intended to influence and control both foreigners themselves as well as Chinese citizens' contact with and perception of outsiders. The term also comprises China's external relations?both official state-to-state and so-called unofficial or ...

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Overview

This book provides the first detailed analysis of a crucial and distinctive element of Chinese foreign policy. Anne-Marie Brady follows the development of the Chinese Communist Party's 'foreign affairs' system since 1921, focusing on waishi, the external policies intended to influence and control both foreigners themselves as well as Chinese citizens' contact with and perception of outsiders. The term also comprises China's external relations—both official state-to-state and so-called unofficial or 'people-to-people' diplomacy. In effect, waishi activities encompass all matters related to foreigners and foreign things, not merely diplomacy. By managing the foreign presence in China and China's contacts with the outside world and by controlling the Chinese population, the author argues that waishi has proven to be one of the most effective tools in the CCP's repertoire for building and then sustaining its hold on power. Drawing for the first time on policy documents that underpin the phenomena they describe, Brady analyzes trends and developments in waishi during each chronological period. The book elucidates how the CCP's policies evolved: In the 1930s, the need for a broad united front in international relations warred with the desire to control the foreign presence in China; in the 1940s and 1950s, the Sino-Soviet alliance and ridding China of the traces of the 'semi-colonial' past took precedence; in the 1960s, the Sino-Soviet split led to China's claim as the center of world revolution; and in the past twenty years of reform, the focus has been the ongoing quest to create a modern nation-state as China opens up to the outside world. The author considers waishi's deeper meaning as an overriding approach to the 'foreign,' which links state-to-state diplomacy with the management of the foreign presence in China. Her groundbreaking research is based on a previously unexplored genre of waishi materials (almost all classified) in Chinese, extensive interviews with waishi officials and foreign participants of the system, as well as archival research inside and outside of China. The photograph used on the cover of the book was doctored by the Chinese government. The original photograph showed Edgar Snow standing on the Tiananmen podium with (reading from left to right) Snow, translator Ji Chaozhu, Mao Zedong, and Edgar Snow's wife, Lois Wheeler Snow. In the book's cover photograph, which was released internationally, Lois Wheeler Snow has been replaced by Lin Biao—at the time Mao's number two—shown prominently clutching Quotations from Mao Zedong, otherwise known as the Little Red Book. Lin Biao was no doubt inserted not only to show his ranking in the leadership but also to demonstrate that the shift towards rapprochement with the West which the Snow's visit to China in 1970 represented, was supported by the CCP's radical left as symbolized by Lin Biao.

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Editorial Reviews

The China Journal
Brady has broken important new ground and produced a richly documented, clearly written study that should be read not only by anyone interested in Chinese foreign affairs and by China-desk officers in foreign chanceries, but also by anyone planning to take up residence in the People's Republic of China.
Choice
The volume is clearly written and insightful. Highly recommended.
China Church Quarterly
An extremely well researched and organized exposition of the 'waishi' system by which the Communist Party and Chinese government has consistently dealt with the outside world since the 1920s. . . . Foreigners who live and work in China would benefit greatly from Brady's insights.
The Spectator
So lapidary in its style, and so informative. . . . [An] invaluable book.
— Jonathan Mirsky
China Business Review
Making the Foreign Serve China is a successful account of an area of PRC policy that doesn't get much attention, but that affects foreigners every day. The text is digestible and will engage anyone with basic knowledge of modern Chinese history.
China Review International
Brady's book is a rich and solidly researched study on an important topic in contemporary Chinese history. It is insightful and well written.
International Bulletin Of Missionary Research
Anyone who has lived and worked in China is familiar with the foreign affairs officer, or Wai Ban, who is responsible for managing foreigners' contacts and relations with the local community. Most are courteous and helpful, but they are part of a larger government system designed to monitor and control foreigners in China and to promote the official image of China to the world. Anne-Marie Brady's book is a documented history of this system, how and why it came to be, and how it has changed over the eighty years of Chinese Communist Part (CCP) rule. The book offers an extensive bibliography, comprehensive footnotes, and the added bonus of an excellent eight-page Chinese-Pinyin glossary of important terms.
CHOICE
The volume is clearly written and insightful. Highly recommended.
The Spectator - Jonathan Mirsky
So lapidary in its style, and so informative. . . . [An] invaluable book.
Lowell Dittmer
Central to the understanding of any alien culture is the orientation of perception of the Other. Anne-Marie Brady's fascinating book attempts to clarify how the Chinese Communist regime seeks to frame the Chinese people's relationship to foreigners—ranging from revolutionary sympathizers to curious tourists.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780742518629
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 10/15/2003
  • Series: Asia/Pacific/Perspectives Series
  • Edition number: 320
  • Pages: 320
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.02 (h) x 0.68 (d)

Meet the Author

Anne-Marie Brady is a lecturer in political science at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand.

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 2: Friendship Chapter 3: Internationalists Chapter 4: Cleaning the House Before Inviting the Guests Chapter 5: Beijing's Friends, Moscow's Enemies Chapter 6: Red and Expert Chapter 7: Bridge Building Chapter 8: China Says Yes and No Chapter 9: Friends All over the World? Chapter 10 Appendix Chapter 11 Glossary

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