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Making Tracks: A Writer's Guide to Audiobooks (And How To Produce Them)
     

Making Tracks: A Writer's Guide to Audiobooks (And How To Produce Them)

5.0 1
by J Daniel Sawyer
 
Formerly stranded on the shelf in the back corner of the bookstore, audiobooks now come straight to our ears through online bookstores, smartphone apps, and music services. With savvy operators looking to cash in on the growing consumer demand, how can you as an author grow your audience?

Delivered in a witty, easy style by multiple-award nominated producer J.

Overview

Formerly stranded on the shelf in the back corner of the bookstore, audiobooks now come straight to our ears through online bookstores, smartphone apps, and music services. With savvy operators looking to cash in on the growing consumer demand, how can you as an author grow your audience?

Delivered in a witty, easy style by multiple-award nominated producer J. Daniel Sawyer, Making Tracks gives you the lowdown on today's audiobook landscape. From narrative technique to studio design to production management, you'll learn everything you need to go from zero to full production, and bring your audiobooks to the biggest markets in the world, online and off.

Those audio rights you used to sell to publishers now have real cash value. Learn how to make the most of them in this entertaining, accessible volume.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781480148611
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
10/19/2012
Pages:
248
Sales rank:
931,156
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.52(d)

Meet the Author

A longtime award-nominated audio/video producer and tech journalist-turned novelist, J. Daniel Sawyer's abusive behavior toward the English language finally landed him in trouble with the release of his hard-boiled Clarke Lantham Mysteries. When not speculating about crime and punishment, or laying out twisted visions in his sci-fi thriller series The Antithesis Progression or his cabin fever comedy Down From Ten, he bends his mind toward corrupting his fellow authors with educational books like Throwing Lead: A Writer's Guide to Firearms (and the People Who Use Them) and Making Tracks: A Writer's Guide to Audiobooks (and How To Produce Them).
On the rare occasion that he escapes his cavernous studio to see the light of day, he slips away into the wilds of the San Francisco back country where he devotes his energies to running afoul of local traffic ordinances in his never-ending pursuit of the ultimate driving road.
Should you be so inclined, you can communicate with this shady character, as well as find stories, podcasts, articles, and other literary abominations at http://www.jdsawyer.net

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Making Tracks: A Writer's Guide to Audiobooks (and How to Produce Them) 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
MichaelLaRonn More than 1 year ago
I was in the market for an audiobook version of my short story collection recently, and I wanted to find a resource that would help me understand exactly what I was getting into.  This book is highly technical, and it is geared toward professional narrators in training, or for authors who want to record their own audiobooks. It covers everything you need to know: the state of the audiobook market, barriers to entry, proper recording technique (even hygiene), selecting the right equipment, editing, mastering, and all other aspects of the business side of audiobooks. It's a must-have for anyone looking to do their own audio.  If there's one thing I took away from the book, it's that I don't have the time, resources, or patience to do an audiobook myself. I'm glad I spent the money on this book to learn that rather than jumping into it and finding out first-hand. Let that be a warning to anyone else considering doing their own audio. But for an author like me looking to outsource my audio, there wasn't much for me here. But I have a bit of an audio background, and I can definitely say that Sawyer's advice is sound, especially with recording, production, and post-production. This is why I gave it five stars, because it's perfect for its intended audience. What would have made this book a six star book though, would have been a section on marketing your audiobooks and getting them out there. With the rise of ACX, most people are outsourcing their audio these days, and the key issue for them is how to get the book in front of prospective readers, especially if they're under a royalty-share agreement, where the responsibility falls on both the author and narrator to promote the book. I haven't seen a (good) book on this topic yet, if there's anyone who could do it right, it's probably J. Daniel Sawyer. And it fits in with the book's target audience, too. That's a minor suggestion for an otherwise great book. This was a good read, and if I ever decide to do my own audio, this is the book I'd reread.