Making Vancouver: 1863-1913 by Robert A. J. McDonald, Robert A J McDonald |, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Making Vancouver: 1863-1913

Making Vancouver: 1863-1913

by Robert A. J. McDonald, Robert A J McDonald
     
 

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Making Vancouver is about the people of Vancouver, British Columbia. It traces the social transformation of the city and points out how Shaughnessy Heights lumber barons, Mount Pleasant trades people, and East End Labourers were part of a complext society whose members exhibited sharp differences in attitudes and behaviour.

The book starts with the early

Overview

Making Vancouver is about the people of Vancouver, British Columbia. It traces the social transformation of the city and points out how Shaughnessy Heights lumber barons, Mount Pleasant trades people, and East End Labourers were part of a complext society whose members exhibited sharp differences in attitudes and behaviour.

The book starts with the early years, when settlement on Burrard Inlet centered around two lumber mills and the elite dominated local institutions. Periods of social and political conflict then followed in the wake of the railway, heightening class tensions at teh turn of the century. During the boom years before the First World War, Vancouver experienced tremendous growth, and status became an important factor in defining its social structure.

In Making Vancouver, Robert McDonald depicts a western city that was neither egalitarian nore closed to opportunity. Vancouver up to the crash of 1913 was a dynamic centre. The rapidity of growth, easy access to resources, a narrow industrial base, and the homogenoeous nature of its population, the majority of which was of British birth, softened the thrust towards class division inherent in capitalism.

Of special interest to Vancouverites, Making Vancouver both confirms and challenges our understanding of the city’s early history. Class tensions still emerge as a central feature of city life, and racism still divides Vancouverites from one another. But conventional wisdom also gives way to new understanding when status is recognized as an important but overlooked aspect of urban experience.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Traces the social transformations of the city of Vancouver, British Columbia, describing the roles of lumber barons, trades people, and laborers and the differences in their attitudes and behavior. Collective biographies of four groups of residents--business leaders, social leaders, civic politicians, and labor activists-- illustrate the nature of social relationships in the city. Includes many b&w photo and tables. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780774805704
Publisher:
University of Washington Press
Publication date:
02/28/1997
Pages:
336
Product dimensions:
6.02(w) x 9.04(h) x 0.98(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

Choice
An expert analysis of the beginnings of one of the great port cities of the world and one of the more beautiful. The book is economic history in its broadest and best sense, the development of Vancouver’s admixture of class, race, and economic growth... [with] excellent maps and an abundance of evocative photographs to match its economics and statistics.

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