Malcolm Lowry's La Mordida: A Scholarly Edition by Malcolm Lowry, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Malcolm Lowry's La Mordida: A Scholarly Edition

Malcolm Lowry's La Mordida: A Scholarly Edition

by Malcolm Lowry
     
 

Although Malcolm Lowry (1909-1957) published only two novels--Ultramarine and Under the Volcano--in his lifetime, numerous other works, most of which have since been edited for publication, were in various stages of composition at his death. La Mordida, the longest and most significant of the manuscripts that have not been previously published

Overview


Although Malcolm Lowry (1909-1957) published only two novels--Ultramarine and Under the Volcano--in his lifetime, numerous other works, most of which have since been edited for publication, were in various stages of composition at his death. La Mordida, the longest and most significant of the manuscripts that have not been previously published, is a draft of a novel based on Lowry's visit to Mexico in 1945-46, which ended in the arrest and deportation of Lowry and his wife following a nightmarish run-in with corrupt immigration authorities. On its most immediate level, the title La Mordida--which means "the little bite," Mexican slang for the small bribe that officials are apt to demand in order to expedite matters--refers to the autobiographical protagonist's legal difficulties. In a larger sense, however, it also represents his inability to escape his past, to repay the fine, or debt, that he owes.

The central narrative of La Mordida involves a descent into the abyss of self, culminating in the protagonist's symbolic rebirth at the book's end. Lowry planned to use this basic narrative pattern as the springboard for innumerable questions about such concerns as art, identity, the nature of existence, political issues, and alcoholism. Above all, La Mordida was to have been a metafictional work about an author who sees no point in living events if he cannot write about them and who is not only unable to write but suspects that he is just a character in a novel.

A reading of La Mordida in the context of Lowry's aesthetic theories and psychological problems shows why he dreaded the completion of his projects to such an extent that he called success a "horrible disaster" and compared death to "the accepted manuscript of one's life." The reason, La Mordida makes clear, lies partly in the aesthetic theories that led Lowry to attempt a book that he prophetically called "something never dreamed of before, a work of art so beyond conception it could not be written."

Patrick A. McCarthy's edition of La Mordida is based on materials held in the Malcolm Lowry Archive at the University of British Columbia. Its publication provides essential evidence for a balanced assessment of Lowry's creative processes and his achievement as a writer.

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
This unfinished (indeed, all but unbegun) novel, which dates from the late 1940s, is, in the words of editor McCarthy (English/Univ. of Miami), another of "the many projects that Malcolm Lowry undertook in the aftermath of Under the Volcano." That classic portrayal of alcoholic self-destruction (published in 1947) remains its gifted and troubled author's single masterpiece. But any detailed knowledge of Lowry's work entails a parallel acquaintance with the facts of his vividly dysfunctional life (190957)—whose excesses and failures are pretty transparently recounted in his fiction, most particularly in the projected novel series The Voyage That Never Ends, of which these roughed-out chapters, outlines, and random notes were intended to form an eventual part. Even in their inchoate state, they illuminate with great clarity the emotional fallout of Lowry's experiences in Mexico as an embattled stranger in a strange land victimized by petty official corruption, and as a writer deeply unsettled by his inability to write; more specifically, they display a paranoid sensibility, a man haunted by the belief that he is under attack by a "daemon." It's hard not to see that demon as Lowry's own yearning to self-destruct. Indispensable for scholars, but also of high interest to all readers who know and admire Lowry's fiction.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780820317632
Publisher:
University of Georgia Press
Publication date:
08/28/1996
Edition description:
Annotated, A Scholarly Edition
Pages:
424
Product dimensions:
6.43(w) x 9.60(h) x 1.15(d)

Meet the Author


Patrick A. McCarthy is a professor of English at the University of Miami. He is the author or editor of seven books, most recently Forests of Symbols: World, Text, and Self in Malcolm Lowry's Fiction (Georgia).

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