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Malcolm X: The FBI File
     

Malcolm X: The FBI File

5.0 2
by Clayborne Carson, David Gallen, Spike Lee
 

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The FBI has made possible a reassembling of the history of Malcolm X that goes beyond any previous research. From the opening of his file in March of 1953 to his assassination in 1965, the story of Malcolm X’s political life is a gripping one.

Shortly after he was released from a Boston prison in 1953, the FBI watched every move Malcolm X made. Their

Overview

The FBI has made possible a reassembling of the history of Malcolm X that goes beyond any previous research. From the opening of his file in March of 1953 to his assassination in 1965, the story of Malcolm X’s political life is a gripping one.

Shortly after he was released from a Boston prison in 1953, the FBI watched every move Malcolm X made. Their files on him totaled more than 3,600 pages, covering every facet of his life. Viewing the file as a source of information about the ideological development and political significance of Malcolm X, historian Clayborne Carson examines Malcolm’s relationship to other African-American leaders and institutions in order to define more clearly Malcolm’s place in modern history.

With its sobering scrutiny of the FBI and the national policing strategies of the 1950s and 1960s, Malcolm X: The FBI File is one of a kind: never before has there been so much material on the assassination of Malcolm X in one conclusive volume.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
This extensive compilation of FBI reports (with an introduction by Spike Lee) provides a fascinating and often infuriating look at the life and influence of Malcolm X. The files span a period from the FBI's initial report in May 1953 (which detailed Malcolm Little's criminal record and Communist party activities) to the aftermath of his assassination in 1965. This is a valuable historical record, as much for what it reveals about the FBI's political agenda as for new information about Malcolm's activities. Historian Clayborne Carson's long introductory essay, "Malcolm and the American State'' places Malcolm within the political and social context of his time. There is a 30-page chronology of Malcolm's life and corresponding FBI files, a transcript of electronic surveillance logs from 1964, and an appendix that lists brief descriptions of 25 political organizations mentioned in the files. This is an important addition to Malcolm's writings and other recent critical studies of his life (e.g., Bruce Perry's Malcolm: A Life of the Man Who Changed Black America). Recommended for academic and larger public libraries.
Booknews
Substantial extracts from the 3,600 page, 19 section declassified FBI file as edited into a narrative of the brief but dynamic career of the charismatic African-American activist. The materials include personal correspondence, newspaper articles, radio and television interviews, sermons and speeches delivered in the cause of black nationalism. With a section-by-section commentary by Clayborne Carson and an introduction by Spike Lee.
Atlantic News Service
Compelling...A stunning composite of the black leader drawn from the declassified FBI documents spanning over a decade of undercover surveillance.
The New York Times
These pages allow us to understand better a remarkable orator who, among all his other gifts, was able to listen and grow.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781626366381
Publisher:
Skyhorse Publishing
Publication date:
02/01/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
520
Sales rank:
983,529
File size:
3 MB

Meet the Author

Clayborne Carson, professor at Stanford University, is the author of The Autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr. and the awardwinning In Struggle: SNCC and the Black Awakening of the 1960s. He is the director of the Martin Luther King, Jr., Research and Education Institute and the Martin Luther King, Jr., Papers Project, a long-term project to edit and publish King’s letters, speeches, and writings.

Spike Lee’s films have won numerous honors, including two Golden Globes and an Academy Award for Do the Right Thing. He also directed the movie biography of Malcolm X.

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Malcolm X: The FBI File 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a must read for all students of African American history. This is one of the most fascinating books you will ever read. So much can be learned, ENJOY!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago