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The Male Factor: The Unwritten Rules, Misperceptions, and Secret Beliefs of Men in the Workplace

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Overview

Based on a nationwide survey and confidential interviews with more than three thousand men, bestselling author of For Women Only, Shaunti Feldhahn, has written a startling and unprecedented exploration of how men in the workplace tend to think, which even the most astute women might otherwise miss. In The Male Factor, Feldhahn investigates and quantifies the private thoughts that men almost never publicly reveal or admit to, but that every woman will want to know.

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The Male Factor: The Unwritten Rules, Misperceptions, and Secret Beliefs of Men in the Workplace

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Overview

Based on a nationwide survey and confidential interviews with more than three thousand men, bestselling author of For Women Only, Shaunti Feldhahn, has written a startling and unprecedented exploration of how men in the workplace tend to think, which even the most astute women might otherwise miss. In The Male Factor, Feldhahn investigates and quantifies the private thoughts that men almost never publicly reveal or admit to, but that every woman will want to know.

Never before has an author gotten inside the hearts and minds of men in the workplace—from CEOs to managers, from lawyers to factory workers—to get a comprehensive and confidential picture of what men commonly think about their female colleagues, how they view flextime and equal compensation, what their expected “rules” of the workplace are, what managing emotion means, and how that lowcut top is perceived. Because the men in the surveys and interviews were guaranteed anonymity, they talk in a candid and uncensored way about their daily interactions with women bosses, employees, and colleagues, as well as what they see as the most common forces of friction and misunderstanding between men and women at work.

Among the subjects The Male Factor tackles are:

• how men, with rare exception, view almost any emotional display as a sign that the person can no longer think clearly—as well as what they perceive to be “emotion” in the first place (it’s not just crying)

• why certain trendy clothes that women wear may create a career-sabotaging land mine in terms of how male colleagues perceive them

• the unintentional signals that can change a man’s perception of a woman from “assertive and competent” to “difficult”

Women will likely be surprised, even shocked, by these revelations. Some may find them challenging. Yet what they will gain is an invaluable understanding of how their male bosses, colleagues, subordinates, and customers react to a host of situations—as well as the ability to correct common misperceptions. The Male Factor offers a unique road map to what men in the workplace are thinking, allowing women the opportunity to decide for themselves how to use the insights Feldhahn reveals.

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  • Shaunti Feldhahn
    Shaunti Feldhahn  

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for The Male Factor

"The Male Factor is the singularly best business book for women I've read in years.  This well-researched yet thoroughly readable book is rich with rare insights into how men really see women in the workplace -- and how with a few simple adjustments you can even the playing field."  

--Lois P. Frankel, Ph.D., author of Nice Girls Don't Get the Corner Office and See Jane Lead      

“Many times in my career I've been the only female in a meeting or holding a seat on the executive team, and I felt I needed a translator - either to understand my male colleagues or to make sure they understood me. The Male Factor provides that translation. We no longer have to guess at what "makes men tick" in the workplace. Shaunti Feldhahn asked them, and amazingly, they told her!”

--Stacie Hagan, Chief People Officer at Earthlink, Inc.

“Smart, effective communication is what makes for successful leadership and productive workplaces.  The Male Factor sheds light on how subtle and not so subtle gender communication differences can thwart a woman’s rise in the workplace. Even minor shifts in communication approach can help women navigate and break through that invisible barrier. There is something here for every woman, no matter where you are in your career.”  

-- Linda Sawyer, CEO, Deutsch Inc.

 

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385528115
  • Publisher: Crown Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 12/29/2009
  • Pages: 310
  • Product dimensions: 5.70 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

SHAUNTI FELDHAHN is the best-selling author of For Women Only:What You Need to Know About the Inner Lives of Men and For Men Only: A Straightforward Guide to the Inner Lives of Women. Her books have sold two million copies and have been translated into fifteen different languages. A longtime nationally sydicated columnist, she holds a master's degree in public policy from Harvard University, has worked on Wall Street, and now lives in Atlanta, Georgia.

www.MaleFactorChristian.com

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Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1   A New Skill Set     "Are you saying women don't already know that?"   The charismatic African-American businessman sitting next to me in first class looked at me in disbelief. We were only a few minutes into the usual "What do you do?" airplane conversation when I shared something that apparently stunned him.   I had explained that I was a financial analyst by training, had worked on Wall Street, and was now, unexpectedly, a bestselling author and speaker about relationships.   His inevitable question: "What's your main topic?"   "Men." I grinned at his wry expression. "I spent a few years interviewing and surveying a few thousand men. My last book identifies some ways that men tend to privately think and feel, that women tend not to know."   He folded his arms across his chest, and it was his turn to chuckle. "OK," he said, "hit me with one."   So I shared one of my findings about men--one that I will share with you in the following pages--and that is when the amusement turned to disbelief.   When I confirmed that even the most astute women may not know that particular truth about men, I could see that suddenly, his thoughts were off in a universe of their own. If he hadn't been strapped in his seat, I think he would have gotten up and startedpacing.   "That explains something!" he finally said. "You see, I'm a corporate trainer and consultant. Fortune 100 corporations bring me in to help with leadership and strategy at the highest levels of the organization. And all too often, I see skilled and talentedwomen sabotage their careers because they treat the men they work with in a way that no man would treat another man."   He looked at me with awakening interest. "But from what you're telling me, these women probably don't even realize that that is what they are doing."   It was my turn to be interested, and my notebook and pen were already out. "Can you give me an example?"   "I'll give you an example of something that just happened a few hours ago." For the next few minutes, he told me his story (which I'll relay in a later chapter), and concluded, "I was so puzzled why this female executive would shoot herself in the footlike that! But perhaps she simply didn't understand how her actions would be perceived by her colleagues--colleagues who were mostly men."     THE HOLE IN THE BUCKET   The range of what we think and do is limited by what we fail to notice. And, because we fail to notice that we fail to notice, there is little we can do to change until we notice how our failing to notice shapes our thoughts and deeds.  --R. D. LAING     Over the last few decades, corporations across America have developed a bucket of programs to help advance or retain women. Many approaches have been quite effective; others, better in theory than in practice. We've seen a surge in management attentionto work/life balance issues--particularly to retain working moms--and a corresponding surge in flextime and telecommuting options. Businesses and industry groups are increasingly fostering female networks and mentoring relationships as an alternative to playinggolf with the guys, and are emphasizing professional development for rising women. Organizations large and small have studied and trained their people on avoiding sexual harassment, and on the unique needs of female workers, customers, and stakeholders. Gender-equitytask forces have proliferated.   But as valuable as that effort is, I've come to realize that it has a significant hole. We as women can be skilled, talented, highly educated, mentored, networked--and yet trade all of that away by unintentionally undermining ourselves in our interactionswith male colleagues. As my new friend on the airplane put it, we can still sabotage ourselves simply because we do not understand the "male factor": some relevant truths about how the male half of the population thinks--and thus how they may be perceiving(or misperceiving) our words and actions.   Even without that potential trap, we may be missing some important insight, effectiveness, and tactical advantage through a simple gap in information--a gap exacerbated by the fact that (as you will see) men often have clear internal expectations but don'tfeel able to openly share what they are privately thinking. So the end result is the same: A woman can all too easily be missing valuable information that might be helpful or important for her---information that she would presumably want to know in today'smarket. One senior executive put it this way:     Women in business have seen some tremendous opportunities open up, but have also seen that it is still a man's world in many ways. What I mean, though, is different than you may think. What I mean is that, historically, for better or for worse, men prettymuch created what we mean by "the business world" today. And since men still tend to hold most of the top-level positions, their subconscious ideas about how things should work are still framing the debate.   It would be extremely helpful for women to have insights into what it's like to be a man in that business world. When men say things like, "It's not personal; it's business," it would be helpful for women to understand what "it's business" actually meansin the minds of the men whose ideas originally defined that business world.     Based on everything I have heard from men about how they think and feel--and how surprising some of those facts have been to the millions of women who have read my previous books or heard me discuss those findings--I would argue that understanding menin the ways that might impact us is a career-critical skill set that women can develop, like any other.   Over the years, I've heard from hundreds of women readers who were validated that they had already recognized and incorporated some of these truths into their workplace approach--and from many others who wished they had learned these often-hidden truthsearlier or better.   All of us want to be perceived as "getting it" instead of triggering the unspoken question, Why would she do that? While the need for understanding is most obvious among younger women who are still learning their way in the marketplace, a better understandingof men has certainly helped senior female professionals, as well. One senior vice president found her work relationships with men improving so much after she read my original book that she personally bought one hundred copies, one for every woman in her department.   If in your line of work you have any significant interaction with male superiors, coworkers, subordinates, customers, or other constituents, it is worth it to get inside their heads and better understand what they privately think--especially in areas thataffect you, but that they would never tell you themselves. Not because their way is "right," or because you should necessarily adapt to their expectations, but because their perceptions exist and could be affecting you regardless of whether you know what theyare. Far better to have full information, so you can make the informed decisions that are right for you.     MEN 101   You may have seen the humorous graphic comparing women and men to two different old-fashioned control panels. The one labeled "Woman" has dozens of random buttons, gauges, and circuit breakers. The one labeled "Man" has an on-off switch.   Pop culture suggests women are complex, while men are straightforward. And in some ways, that may seem to be true. But in other ways, I've found it to be quite misleading--and dangerously so. Not taking into account the complexity and depth of men's thinkingcan put women at a significant disadvantage.     How I Woke Up to What I Didn't Know   In 2001, I stumbled across some important facts about what men are often privately thinking and feeling, that women often never know.   I had recently moved with my husband from New York City to Atlanta, and was working as a financial and organizational analyst. In my spare time I was also writing fiction. One of my main characters in my second novel was a man, a good, decent husband andfather and successful businessman. And I realized that although I could put on paper what my character was doing in my various scenes, I had no idea how to write what a man would be thinking. So I began asking male friends for help. I would describe a givenscene, and then ask, "What would you be thinking in this situation?"   And I often found myself shocked. Over and over again, the men described foundational, private thoughts that I would never have guessed at. They described deep, daily ways of thinking and feeling that were a complete surprise to me--even after eight yearsof marriage. I kept thinking to myself, "Why have I not heard this before?!"   I started doing more and more of these interviews, hitting up everyone from my male colleagues to the guys behind the counter at Starbucks. And it soon became clear that what I was learning was too important to stop with creating a character in a novel.So once the novel was finished I began a more systematic approach to investigating the most important things that women just tend not to "get" about men. Over the course of several years, I interviewed and surveyed more than 1,500 men, conducting two professional,nationally representative surveys.   Very early on, I realized that what I was hearing related to either a man's personal life or his work life. The men would sometimes describe how they felt or thought in a given home-life scenario, and sometimes describe their private impressions at theoffice. Both were equally eye-opening to me. But I couldn't tackle both in the same book. So I started with the personal relationships, and wrote For Women Only: What You Need to Know About the Inner Lives of Men, which was published in 2004. Shortly thereafter,my husband, Jeff, and I teamed up to write the companion book, For Men Only: A Straightforward Guide to the Inner Lives of Women. The books instantly became bestsellers; in just four years they sold more than 1.5 million copies and have been translated intofifteen languages.   I became extremely busy with traveling and speaking, often at large women's conferences, churches, government workshops, or marriage seminars. And over the next few years, I continued the process of investigating the key surprises in our personal relationships,researching and publishing books for teenagers about how the opposite sex thinks, as well as a book for parents to help them understand how their teenager thinks (a scary prospect, I know!).   But as each year went by, I continued and expanded my research of men, with an eye toward a book that would help women understand men in the workplace, and, ultimately, help women advance.   In 2007, I turned my full attention to understanding men in the workplace. How do men privately think and feel about things at work that women don't already know? What do men privately say when they are promised anonymity and can be completely honest andcandid, that we would never otherwise hear? What are the truths that seem common to most men, regardless of personality, industry, age, race, or any other differing factor--the private truths that we women often misunderstand, or miss completely, simply becausewe may be wired differently?     What do men privately say when they are promised anonymity and can be completely honest and candid that we would never otherwise hear?     Most important, what are the areas in which most men instinctively tend to act and think the same way, tend to subconsciously expect others to do the same, and view not doing so as anything from a confusing aberration to outright weakness? In other words,which of these inner truths about men might unwittingly trip women up without our ever realizing it--and which might help us to be even more effective once we understand them?   In pursuing these questions I found, as I had with the research on For Women Only, that my analytical training and Wall Street experience provided an important--if a bit unusual--foundation for uncovering, analyzing, and communicating hidden truths abouthow people think.   I have a master's degree in public policy with a concentration in business from Harvard University; my core classes in quantitative and qualitative analysis were taken at the Harvard Kennedy School, and my electives at Harvard Business School. After graduation,I became a financial analyst at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, primarily investigating and analyzing what was going on underneath the surface of the Japanese financial meltdown, and sharing those findings at the highest levels of the Federal ReserveSystem.   I worked there for only three intense years, but it laid the foundation for an entirely new type of analysis of what was going on underneath the surface in relationships. I am forever grateful to my former colleagues and supervisors for throwing me inat the deep end and setting their expectations high.     THE RESEARCH BEHIND THIS BOOK   Reason is the slow and torturous method by which those who do not know the truth discover it  --BLAISE PASCAL     During the years of investigating how men privately think in the workplace, I interviewed every businessman I could, distilled the truths that I felt would be the most helpful to women readers, and then worked with professional survey designers to developand conduct a nationally representative survey to test if what I was hearing was common to most men. That sounds simple, but it required an intense effort involving me, seven of my staff researchers and assistants, several corporate consultants, and a teamof survey experts from two different companies over the course of eight years. In the end, well over 1,500 men provided input specifically for this book, in addition to the 1,500 men who had contributed their insights to my previous research.   Those numbers don't just include "official" surveys and interviews. I kept a notebook, pen, and digital recorder permanently by my side so I could capture informal interviews in the most unlikely places. I travel a lot, and on every flight, if I was sittingnext to a man who was willing to talk (most were), I would ask him questions. At coffee shops, restaurants, on the subway, and in social gatherings, I looked for opportunities to strike up conversations with businessmen and conduct impromptu interviews. Itcontinues to surprise me what a man will divulge when you don't know his name or where he works, and he's on a boring daily commute.   It is also amazing what a man will tell you when you do know his name and where he works--but he has been guaranteed anonymity. I guaranteed each man in writing that all quotes appearing in the book would be completely anonymous, and that they would neverbe able to be tied to a particular individual or organization. To ensure that anonymity, I promised to judiciously alter identifying details.   As a result, I got virtual--and often physical--access to the inner offices and leaders of dozens of household-name companies and organizations in every corner of the country (and a few beyond our borders). I interviewed hundreds of men--from entrepreneurswith a start-up staff of ten people, to businessmen who started some of our most recognized retailers. I heard surprising insights from both middle-level managers at small companies and C-level executives of the largest companies in the world. I sat down forinterviews in cluttered, disorganized offices in remote suburbs, and in the most luxurious penthouse-suite offices I've ever seen. And I did several dozen conference calls with executives who were in cities beyond my immediate travel plans, but whom I couldn'tafford to miss.   From Manhattan to Orlando, Omaha to Austin, Minneapolis to Los Angeles to Seattle, and of course in my current hometown of Atlanta, I was amazed and grateful for the breadth of input I was able to receive.   My main regret is that in the limited space of this book I am only able to pass along a fraction of what I have gathered. I can't, for confidentiality reasons, post full transcripts of these conversations. But if you go to The MaleFactorBook.com, the websitefor this book, I will over time post as much helpful information as I can, scrubbed of all identifying information.   About a dozen senior-level businessmen proved to be particularly helpful and insightful and became more in-depth advisors during the process, agreeing to answer follow-up questions or sitting for multiple interviews. These advisors ranged from C-levelexecutives at nationally recognized companies, to owners of thriving businesses, to partners at management consulting firms. Some of these men are quoted multiple times (although, like all others, they are identified by a fictitious first name).   You also will read a number of examples and stories relayed by a series of helpful female advisors, businesswomen who proved invaluable during this process. Some of these women signed confidentiality statements and spent hours reading through transcriptsand draft chapters, setting up interviews with men, helping me develop and test the survey, and thinking through the application of what I was learning to their own experiences.  
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Customer Reviews

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( 19 )
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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2014

    Jesseca

    Not here. Got to res. 17 again. They switched places.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2014

    Jacob

    Here

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  • Posted July 13, 2010

    the evidence necessary to make informed decisions by examining the working world through male-coloured lenses

    What working woman wouldn't want a free pass inside her male colleagues' head and figure out just "what was he thinking?" While being transported inside a man's brain is unrealistic, The Male Factor accomplishes the next best thing. Based on seven years of extensive research pulling results from confidential interviews with thousands of men, this book is a valuable tool for understanding and navigating the workplace rules from a man's perspective. Exploring a topic that lends itself to sensationalism, the depth and integrity of the research is vital to substantiating its credibility and foundational to it being taken seriously. It validates the observations in the book as reliable and the genuine response of real men in real situations.

    What is commendable about The Male Factor is that spells out up front that it is not intended to throw a universal blanket statement that relegates all men into a one size fits all standard fabric. It takes into account a man's individuality and admits that not everyone fits the mold. Likewise, each reader can expect to apply the concepts as it relates to her experience and situation. The goal is to present the evidence necessary to make informed decisions by examining the working world through male-coloured lenses. The book does not just dispense facts and findings and leave you hanging. It is informative and useful, offering alternatives and suggestions on what women can do to get themselves on the same side of the fence as their male counterparts. It establishes common ground by not only communicating the "why" but also the "how."

    The Male Factor is subtitled, "the groundbreaking research that reveals what every woman should know". I would agree with that claim. Even for those who are well-versed in the intricate details of how a man's brain is wired and have found joy and success working with men, this book still has plenty to offer. I would definitely recommend reading it from cover to cover so you won't miss a thing. You may also want to keep a journal or notepaper close by - and perhaps a few highlighters. Though the journey will be uniquely yours, some takeaways include:

    .Articulate your point or concern then let it go and move on
    . Get to the point quickly
    . Never start a conversation with a man by asking him "why" or jump in with "You need to.what you need to do." advice
    . Don't take things at work personally
    . Find out how men perceive and process emotions
    . Know what being treated with respect and trust looks like in a man's eye
    . Why you're not likely to see a man ask for help

    What perhaps stands out as the most empowering and encouraging facet in The Male Factor is that none of its recommendations and insights negates or asks a woman to change who she really is or deny the strengths and qualities that are inherent in most women. What it does is erase the "I didn't know" factor and makes women more clued-in when interacting with men in the workplace by being aware of his vantage point. Undoubtedly, as you read the book, you will shake your head and say, "if only I had known I would have approached it differently." And that is the whole point of The Male Factor. It's about converting knowledge into tangible results. The bottom line is that understanding the male culture at work magnifies a woman's effectiveness and ultimately adds value to and prospers the organization. At the end of the day, it creates a partnership that challenges each oth

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 18, 2010

    Surprises in the Workplace

    This was actually written for women who are not understanding how men operate, how can men say "it's not personal, it's just business" and other misunderstandings. Ms. Feldhahn comprehensively surveyed men from a wide variety of jobs, ages, ethnicities and salarys. She found out how men worked and then presented the findings in a very understandable way. She points out the differences in how actions are perceived between men and women, how what one may find inconsequential is a major faux paux to the other. I found out some things that I did not know about how women communicate and why sometimes there are disagreements over communication and moving forward on a project. Although this is written primarily for women, many men would do well to read this also.

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  • Posted January 16, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A truly insightful look at male perceptions in the workplace.

    Shaunti Feldhahn spent many years collecting data about how men think, that led her to start collecting information about how men perceive women in the workplace. At first I thought that this would be a bunch of statistics and charts. There were some statistics and charts but that was not the meat of the book. Most of the book explains what men are thinking about working women, why they think that way, and what changes a woman could make to be better accepted by the men she works with.

    There were so many things that I didn't really think would actually hinder a woman's ability to move up in the corporate world. But most of these things were things that all (or most) women do instinctively that men think are unprofessional. Then there were the things that I've learned in my own experiences that I thought were fairly common knowledge amongst women (but apparently they are not). One of the things that was most shocking to me is the way women dress, even when we think we look professional, can be very distracting to men. I won't go into specifics, but I think it's interesting, especially when you go to her website and see some examples...

    I liked how she looked at the inherent differences between how men and women think and how the brain is wired for each gender to have these differences of thought. Even though I've recognized these differences on my own I never even realized that they would affect how a woman is perceived at work. I also liked how each fact was followed up with a quote from a man that she had interviewed. The quotes were very pertinent and really made me think about the point the man was trying to make.

    I really liked this book. Not only was it interesting but I think that it was enlightening. Just as Feldhahn says, you may not agree with everything she discovered about men, but if you can at least understand it then you could be doing yourself a huge favor.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2010

    The Male Factor

    Okay , if you ever wondered why women face things in the workplace that make you want to pull your hair out; then you should read this book. Did you know that the way a woman dresses in the workplace can affect how a man reacts to her as a professional? Some men see womens work clothes as a camouflage. They think that women purposely try to avert coworkers attention to their physical attributes to attempt to cover up professional faults. Also the way a woman constructs her sentences can be taken the wrong way. Of course I'm sure not all male coworkers feel the same way but still this book is a handy one for your shelf if you are a female working professional. There is some great information to help you whether you are already in the workplace or are planning to enter it soon. Lots of great stuff to take into account.
    This book was provided for review by the WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group.

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  • Posted January 15, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A Must Read for Working Women!

    Women across corporate America strive to understand their male colleagues. They read books, attend seminars, and have meetings, but often fall short in this matter. Compiling years of research and anonymous interviews with men in the workplace-from CEO's to the guy at the desk next to you, best-selling author Shaunti Feldhahn's new book, The Male Factor, bridges the gap in understanding the male psyche.

    Subtitled "The Unwritten Rules, Misperceptions, and Secret Beliefs of Men in the Workplace," Feldhahn hits the mark on many issues that women struggle with in relation to their male coworkers. She covers such topics as:
    why men in the workplace almost always view displays as emotion as the inability to think clearly
    why revealing clothing may be sabotaging your career
    why respect is imperative
    why men separate work and their personal lives and expect you to do so, too

    The Male Factor contains over 300 pages of information, surveys, charts, and quotes from real men. It is not an easy read, but serves as more of a handbook for working women.

    Although I am not in the corporate workplace, The Male Factor broadened my understanding of the way men think. I was surprised by many of the author's findings, and encouraged that there are small things I can do to increase respect and communication with male coworkers. I especially enjoyed the final chapter, written especially for Christian women, which provided Scriptural principles for the workplace. This book should be required reading for all women who work with men, whether in a Fortune 500 company or at the local Subway.

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  • Posted January 15, 2010

    Review: The Male Factor

    I happened on Shaunti Feldhahn's book For Women Only a couple of years ago. I wasn't in the market for a book on relationships or how the male mind works. But the book offered some excellent perspectives and some eye-opening insights about why men do what they do; and how the women who love them must respond and behave. I have recommended it to many of my women clients and workshop participants. So, I was excited to read Feldhahn's newest work, The Male Factor. This book looks at the inner workings of men in the workplace from a Christian perspective.


    There is already the proverbial glass ceiling when it comes to women in the workplace. Not only do women have to navigate their way through the job market, but also when they get the job they must navigate a different kind of ship. Trying to figure out how to behave around male colleagues, bosses and customers doesn't leave much room for doing a good job, let alone being her best.

    Many talented women today risk undermining their careers without realizing it, simply because they don't understand how they are perceived by their male colleagues and customers. In The Male Factor, some of the issues we learn about are men's unwritten "rules" of the workplace; how men perceive workplace emotion; and why revealing clothing can sabotage a woman's effectiveness in the workplace.

    "Never before has an author gotten inside the hearts and minds of men in the workplace - from CEO's to non-profit managers, from lawyers to factory workers - to discover what they commonly think about women on the job, what their expected "rules" of the workplace are, what "managing emotion" means, and what factors improve or harm a man's respect for a female co-worker." ~ From the inside book jacket

    The Male Factor equips women with the information they need to make informed decisions and compete on a level playing field.

    This book was provided for review by the WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2010

    Very Good for the Working Woman

    Many talented women today risk undermining their careers without realizing it, simply because they don't understand how they are perceived by their male colleagues and customers.

    In What Men really Think, best-selling author Shaunti Feldhahn reveals the inner reality behind men's views - the unspoken expectations that no man would dare to publicly acknowledge, and no woman would learn from an HR department. These revelations include:

    . Men's unwritten 'rules' of the workplace
    . How men perceive workplace emotion
    . What common situations with female colleagues most frustrate men-- and why
    . Why revealing clothing can sabotage a woman's effectiveness
    . Why some men think flextime is fine, but equal compensation for it is not

    What Men Really Think equips women with the information they need to make informed decisions and compete on a level playing field.

    This book gave me some insight into working with a male boss again. From the chapter about emotions in the workplace to the chapter on the little things that drive men crazy, there were many insightful tidbits to help a woman in a male run workplace.

    Shaunti put a lot of research and time into the information in the book. And while there was information specifically for the Christian, it could be easily missed throughout the book. There was a chapter on putting it into perspective at the end of the book directed specifically toward the Christian woman.

    I enjoyed reading and learning about the male thoughts on emotion in the workplace, how men compartmentalize their thoughts and duties, and how perceptive they can be toward women in the workplace. I hope to apply some of this information in my own position.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2010

    Understanding the Workplace

    I have to say I was very excited to hear about this book. Many of you may have heard of For Women Only and For Men Only, two books by Shaunti Feldhahn to help understand the inner worlds of the opposite sex based on survey results and interviews. Well, she has done it again.

    The Male Factor is Feldhahn's look into the inner world of men in the workplace. The workplace is still dominated by rules, expectations, and assumptions that make it still highly a "man's world." After hundreds of surveys and personal interviews, Feldhahn explores just what the means and how women can understand this secret world in order to better navigate and succeed. She explains that many of the men she interviewed sincerely want women to be successful and wanted to pass on information about what women do to basically shoot their careers in the foot.

    As she did in For Women Only, Feldhahn takes different assumptions, like "it's business, it's not personal" and looks at what the means to a man and why that is different than what it means to a woman hearing that statement. Feldhahn discusses why even at work women need to pay attention to the fact that men are highly visual creatures. And of course, one of my favorites, was the discussion about being emotional at work and how men and women interpret that differently.

    This book was an enjoyable read. Feldhahn uses direct quotes and examples to really explain each point. She is careful to explain that she is not saying one way is right and another wrong, but merely helping to explain how it is so that women can then do what they like with the information. I think that I learned a lot from this book. I've asked my husband a few things (like: really, you don't take that personally? or really, that distracts you?) and it will probably help me relate to his work world a bit better. There also were times when I was reading that I thought "Oh, that explains that time when..."

    I highly recommend this book. If you are in the workplace, I think you could learn many things to help you relate better to the men you work with. Ladies, you don't have to be in the workplace right now to appreciate and learn from this book. There are principles that could help you in ministry, volunteering, or understanding your husband's work world. It's also just interesting to read about how different men and women can be!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2010

    What men have to say ...

    Let's face it - men and women are just different. Not just in personal relationships, but in the business world as well. Shaunti Feldhahn's new book "The Male Factor" gives readers a peek into "the unwritten rules, misperceptions, and secret beliefs of men in the workplace." This book was provided for review by the WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group.

    Feldhahn and her research team have gathered insights from hundreds of men in the business world through surveys and interviews to answer this core question: "Is there anything you've seen talented women do that undermines their effectiveness with men, simply because the women don't know how it is being perceived?"

    Beginning with differences in the structure of the male and female brain, and exploring topics such as "It's not personal, it's business," the emotional side of women, getting the job done no matter what, and other ways women may unknowingly undermine their full potential in the workplace, the men, many of whom are high-level executives, give feedback to the core question, and practical advice for women to work more effectively with men on the job.

    What did I like about the book? Feldhahn tells in the introduction how she was able to get men to first of all take the survey, and secondly be honest in their answers. Most of the men quoted in the book genuinely want women to be successful.

    What I didn't like so much? The book seems to be directed toward women in white-collar, high-level, or at least upwardly-mobile career paths. I would also have liked to see some references to how working-class Joe the Plumber men would answer the core question, to see if their answers are in line with the CEO's and CFO's answers.

    Would I recommend this book? I believe this book is beneficial to women who wish to advance in their careers, or who are starting careers in competitive, traditionally male-dominated fields. A word of caution though. Some women may take offense to the subjects brought up by the men who were interviewed, for example, the chapter about how men react to some wardrobe choices. The underlying intent of this book is for it to be read with the perception of a mentor giving constructive feedback how to improve how you relate with male colleagues.

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  • Posted January 13, 2010

    Consider the Male Factor

    The Male Factor is essential reading for today's working woman. When ordering please be sure to get the expanded edition which has faith-based wisdom and an added chapter with valuable information from experienced Christian working women.

    I found this book insightful and surprising! You will read about how men handle emotional situations in the workplace or what they interpret as an assault to their character. After reading some of the book I asked my husband for his opinion and he stated the book was spot on.

    I am not currently in the workforce yet I found this book to offer an inside look into men's attitudes that is invaluable. This book centers on the relationships between men and women in the workplace, however, the wisdom you gain extends beyond.

    (*book provided for review by waterbrook publishing)

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